Practicum

A practicum is an opportunity for students to integrate on-site work with class time for interdisciplinary connections and reflection. A practicum includes placement at an outside organization, along with an academic component that involves regular meetings with faculty members and staff members, and culminates in a final reflective paper and presentation and, in some situations, participation in the College poster session.

Practicum 2021-2022 Courses

Foundations in Workplace Culture and Well-Being

Sophomore and Above, Practicum—Fall | 5 credits | Hybrid Remote/In-Person

Second-, third-, and fourth-year students who will be completing an internship placement in fall 2021 are eligible to take this practicum-based course, offered in collaboration with SLC Career Services. The aim of the course is to help support students in making the transition from college life to work experience in their chosen field—bridging the space between academic learning and engagement in a work setting. Over the semester, students will develop an academic understanding of relevant concepts based in industrial-organizational and positive psychology. Students will be invited to integrate their internship experiences through class discussion, experiential activities, collaborative group work, and observation journals. The goal is for students to gain an academic and experiential understanding of key concepts, which students may apply to help promote a successful work-life balance this semester and beyond. Topics that are generally applicable to workplace culture and work-life balance will be addressed. Class reading assignments will include academic literature in industrial-organizational psychology, positive psychology, and related fields, as well as relevant popular media. Topics will include workplace communication, diversity and inclusion, professional networking, job crafting, stress management, work-life balance, and ways of supporting well-being. Classes will include discussions based on assigned reading and internship observations, experiential activities related to class topics (e.g., communication, networking, meditation), Career Service workshops, and a recent alumni panel. Students who have already completed Foundations in Workplace Culture and Well-being (for 3 or 5 credits) and are completing a new internship may enroll in this course for a second time (for 3 or 5 credits), with an emphasis on further developing leadership and mentorship skills. Returning students will attend the same class meetings as first time students; however, reading and class assignments will focus on early career supervision, mentorship, and leadership roles. An offer letter for your placement must be secured and submitted to Career Services prior to registering for this course; your placement should begin no later than the end of the add/drop period. Internships may be in any field and must be approved by SLC Career Services prior to registering for this course. This class meets once weekly in the evening and may include periodic conference meetings and/or Career Service consultations. Students are expected to attend weekly class meetings in addition to regularly attending their internship placements.

Faculty

Building a Professional Identity

Sophomore and Above, Practicum—Spring | 5 credits | Hybrid Remote/In-Person

Second-, third-, and fourth-year students who will be completing an internship placement during the spring 2022 semester are eligible to take this practicum-based course, offered in collaboration with SLC Career Services. The aim of this course is to help support students in making the transition from college life to work experience in their chosen field following the COVID-19 pandemic. The course will include mid-semester workshops on communication and networking, plus an end-of-semester alumni panel based on students’ interests. Over the semester, students will explore the process of building a professional identity during a time of remote work and uncertainty. Weekly reading will include topics in psychology and related fields. Topics will include building a professional identity, early supervisory skills, diversity equity and inclusion, workplace communication, imposter syndrome, professional networking, stress management, work-life balance, and ways of supporting well-being. Classes will include discussions based on assigned reading and internship observations and experiential activities related to class topics (e.g., communication, networking, meditation). Students will be invited to integrate their internship experiences through class discussion, experiential activities, collaborative group work, and observation journals. The goal is for students to gain an academic and experiential understanding of key concepts, which students may apply this semester and beyond. Students who have already completed Building a Professional Identity (for three or five credits) and are completing a new internship may enroll in this course for a second time (for three or five credits), with an emphasis on further developing leadership and mentorship skills. Returning students will attend the same class meetings as first-time students; however, reading and class assignments will focus on early career supervision, mentorship, and leadership roles. Internships may be in any field and must be approved by SLC Career Services prior to registering for this course. An offer letter for your placement must be secured prior to registering for this course; your placement should begin no later than the end of the add/drop period. This class meets once weekly in the evening and may include periodic conference meetings and/or Career Service consultations. Students are expected to attend weekly class meetings in addition to regularly attending their internship placements.

Faculty

SLCeeds: Idea Launch

Open, Practicum—Spring | 5 credits | Hybrid Remote/In-Person

This course experience teaches students the process for taking any idea from concept to creation and the strategies for executing that work effectively and efficiently. All students will engage in the process within the context of ideas developed by the students. By combining theory with practice, students will have the opportunity to experience a full process cycle so that they can begin the journey to mastering these skills. Assignments will track the various steps of the process, culminating in a final paper and presentation to a panel of alumni judges.

Faculty

Advanced Collective in Animation or Experimental Media

Intermediate/Advanced, Small seminar—Fall

This collective for advanced animation and experimental media is for students seeking to work on independent-study projects or to acquire credit for fieldwork in those disciplines. The group will first meet weekly to establish guidelines and schedules for projects; then, the class will serve as a gathering place to report on project development and/or the progress of an internship. Weekly meetings provide a framework for research, development, and collaborative assistance toward an advanced project that may take the shape of a short film or professional experience in an internship. Led by a team of filmmaking and moving-image arts faculty, students will be interviewed during registration to evaluate their proposed projects or research. The week-to-week structure of the collective will be tailored to meet the needs of individual projects/groups as the semester progresses. The collective is open to experienced animation and experimental media students; both individuals and group projects are invited to apply to the class. Interested students should come to the interview prepared to present a project proposal or an internship already secured.

Faculty

Concept Art: Visual Development

Open, Seminar—Spring

This course will explore the preproduction aspects of animation concept development. Students will gain knowledge in character development, background environments, object and prop design, flora and fauna, scene building, color keys, aerial mapping, and techniques for digital painting. Through the development of scene paintings, model sheets, and animatics, students will draw and conceptualize spaces, characters, and props that are visually harmonious and consistent in form and function. Students will research and produce narrative outlines that include visual and environmental components to establish a full understanding of an animated project. Both hand-drawn materials and digital drawing will be used during the semester. Photoshop, Storyboard Pro, Procreate, and Final Cut Pro software will be utilized for character design, background paintings, and concept presentation animatics. The final project for this course will include a fully developed, multicharacter/environment animatic. Knowledge from this course can be used to create and enhance an animation portfolio, establish a concept outline for an interactive media project, and help in developing a cast of characters and environments for a graphic novel or an animated film. Software used throughout the course: Photoshop, Storyboard Pro, Harmony, Procreate, and Final Cut Pro X or Premier.

Faculty

An Introduction to Statistical Methods and Analysis

Open, Lecture—Spring

Variance, correlation coefficient, regression analysis, statistical significance, and margin of error...you’ve heard these terms and other statistical phrases bantered about before, and you’ve seen them interspersed in news reports and research articles. But what do they mean? And why are they so important? Serving as an introduction to the concepts, techniques, and reasoning central to the understanding of data, this lecture course focuses on the fundamental methods of statistical analysis used to gain insight into diverse areas of human interest. The use, misuse, and abuse of statistics will be the central focus of the course; and specific topics of exploration will be drawn from experimental design theory, sampling theory, data analysis, and statistical inference. Applications will be considered in current events, business, psychology, politics, medicine, and other areas of the natural and social sciences. Statistical (spreadsheet) software will be introduced and used extensively in this course, but no prior experience with the technology is assumed. Group conferences, conducted in workshop mode, will serve to reinforce student understanding of the course material. This lecture is recommended for anybody wishing to be a better-informed consumer of data and strongly recommended for those planning to pursue advanced undergraduate or graduate research in the natural sciences or social sciences.

Faculty

Urban Health

Open, Seminar—Fall

This community partnership course will focus on the health of humans living within physical, social, and psychological urban spaces. We will use a constructivist, multidisciplinary, multilevel lens to examine the interrelationship between humans and the natural and built environment, to explore the impact of social group (ethnic, racial, sexuality/gender) membership on person/environment interactions, and to explore an overview of theoretical and research issues in the psychological study of health and illness across the lifespan. We will examine theoretical perspectives in the psychology of health, health cognition, illness prevention, stress, and coping with illness; and we will highlight research, methods, and applied issues. This class is appropriate for those interested in a variety of health careers or anyone interested in city life. The community-partnership/service-learning component is an important part of this class. We will work with local agencies to promote health-adaptive, person-environment interactions within our community.

Faculty