Filmmaking and Moving Image Arts

Sarah Lawrence College’s undergraduate filmmaking and moving image arts program (FMIA) offers a vibrant, dynamic, creative incubator to ignite the imagination of the next generation of media-makers. The program seeks to help students navigate the intersection of art and technology as they acquire the tools and skills of the discipline and develop their critical and creative voices.

Cognizant that not every student will graduate to be a writer, director, producer, or game developer, the program believes that—with the enduring power and influence of cinema, television, the Web, and social media—students in all fields of study benefit from media literacy and theory and a deep understanding of the ways and means of media development and production. The FMIA program explores a broad scope of media-making, including narrative fiction, documentary/nonfiction, experimental film, animation, cinematography, storyboarding, and directing actors, as well as editing, producing, screenwriting, writing for television, writing and producing for the Web, writing for games, and game development.

Interdisciplinary work across the liberal arts is encouraged and formal and informal collaboration among the music, dance, theatre, writing, visual arts, and other disciplines continue to emerge and flourish.

Our program offers an intensive “Semester Away” program—Cinema Sarah Lawrence—where students work on the development and production of a feature film shot on location on Nantucket, MA. We also offer exchange programs in animation with CalArts and study abroad opportunities in film in Paris, Cuba, and at the world-famous FAMU film school in Prague, among others.

Sarah Lawrence College offers state-of-the-art facilities for the FMIA program, including the Donnelly Film Theatre that seats 185 people and has a 4K digital cinema projector, an intimate 35-person screening room, a teaching/editing lab, a 1,400-square-foot soundstage, an animation studio, and a sound and Foley recording booth. Our equipment room offers Sony, Canon, Blackmagic, RED, and ARRI cameras, along with sound, grip, and lighting packages.

Recent graduates routinely have their work represented at some of the world’s most prestigious film and media festivals, most recently at Cannes, Palm Springs, and Slamdance. Graduates who choose to pursue advanced degrees are finding traction at the top film schools in the United States and abroad.

2019-2020 Courses

Filmmaking and Moving Image Arts

First-Year Studies: An Introduction to Cinematography: Visualizing and Creating Images for the Screen

Open , FYS—Year

Behind every artistic vision in filmmaking is an understanding of how to use technology to realize the story on a screen. A skillful cinematographer brings a new dimension to a director’s vision by creating images that enhance the narrative of the film. By studying select examples of visual styles, tones, and continuity from classic films, students will learn key elements to consider when using a camera and lights to further enhance the story. The images that appear on the screen arise from the artistic vision, imagination, and skill of the cinematographer as he/she works in a collaborative relationship with fellow artists. This class will provide students with the opportunity to explore this art form and to learn how to capture visuals that will support the narrative of a story using available resources in a creative way. Students will work, hands-on, with film-production equipment and will explore the theoretical and aesthetic aspects of the craft. Course discussions will include framing, composition, color, and light to create compelling images. Students will learn fundamental “on-set” production skills as they develop and shoot exercises on a weekly basis. In the first semester, students will work on recreating scenes from classic films. Those exercises will focus primarily on visual style and learning basic production techniques. The second semester will focus on original work that will incorporate the lessons learned during the first semester. We will cover operation of cameras, structure and job responsibilities of the production crew, principles of lenses, lighting, and scene composition. All students will produce weekly exercises focused on building skill sets that will prepare them for work beyond the course. Field trips to professional film resources in New York City, reading assignments, and film screenings will be integral to the learning process of the class. Biweekly individual conferences will alternate with group conference activities.

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Introduction to Animation Studies

Open , Lecture—Fall

Students who are interested in pursuing a research project for their final project have the option of registering for this class under Film History.

To animate is to bring to life, to instill movement into that which would otherwise be still. Animated films grant their viewers access to imaginary worlds that are frequently populated by anthropomorphic animals, fantastical environments, and utopian societies. But animation takes many forms. This course offers a broad survey of the global history of animation by embracing the diversity of those forms and by encouraging students to draw connections between the techniques and materials employed by animators and the political, social, and cultural functions of animated texts. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of ways in which animation has historically been created, including works made with sand, paper, puppets, pixels, clay, cels, pinscreens, garbage, and other unconventional materials. Along the way, students will familiarize themselves with key films, filmmakers, filmic technologies, and filmmaking traditions by studying animation from various eras, genres, industries, and countries. In addition to featuring numerous works from Japan and the United States, weekly screenings will incorporate animated shorts and feature films from many different regions, including Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Iran, Korea, Mexico, Poland, Russia, and Swaziland. In-class discussions and course assignments will urge students to grapple with complex questions and issues in the field of animation studies.

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Related Disciplines

Introduction to 2D Digital Animation

Open , Seminar—Fall

In this course, students of all abilities have the opportunity to explore the production of animation, starting with the basics (like squash and stretch, ease in and out, etc.) and moving on to more expressive exercises like marrying animation to music, character expression, and digital experimental techniques. Participants gain an understanding of timing and motion through keyframes, holds, and in-betweens and learn the characteristics of well-designed and executed animation. Over the semester, students will produce a series of short exercises and projects to achieve an animation-skills portfolio by the end of the term. Instruction covers the use of industry-standard tools in Harmony Premier software by Toon Boom. Students are required to provide their own external hard drive; however, digital drawing tablets and cintiq drawing screens are available for use by students registered for this class. No prior experience is required.

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Hand-Drawn Animation

Open , Seminar—Spring

This course focuses on the fundamentals of drawing as they pertain to two-dimensional, hand-drawn animation. Students will gain an understanding of value, motion, and light logic and learn to establish form and structure utilizing concepts in perspective. The course will introduce students to traditional techniques of hand-drawn, frame-by-frame animation, where movement is created through successive, sequential drawings. Students will learn about body mechanics and motion flow in the development of animated characters through techniques that include walk cycles, turning of forms, transformations, holds, squash and stretch, weight, and resistance. Students will design and create pencil test projects using Dragon Frame and Final Cut Pro software. We will regularly screen examples of animations illustrating hand-drawn techniques. The course will conclude with a final project, for which students will develop, conceptualize, and produce a fully animated, hand-drawn scene. Information and skills established in this class can be used to improve basic drawing proficiency, to establish fundamentals for later digital animation production, and to create and enhance an animation portfolio, as well as to develop tangible skills for producing graphic novels. Software: Dragon Frame Stop Motion, Storyboard Pro, Photoshop, Final Cut Pro X.

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Concept Art: The Medea Project

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

Prerequisite: at least one college-level film, animation, or visual arts (painting or drawing) class.

This preproduction film and animation course is designed to provide students with the experience of developing individual, concept-based visual material established by each student’s interpretation of the classical myth of Medea. The class will research the story of Medea, as it is interpreted in the novel Bright Air Black, by David Vann, and this will become the intermediary through which students develop and produce a digital production portfolio and animatic. Through readings, discussions, and drawings, each student will formulate an interpretation of Bright Air Black that both expresses the original narrative and is uniquely their own. For this, students will produce a cast of characters through model sheets and size boards, character staging and backgrounds, and a high-resolution animatic of their project. The course concludes with the class together producing a printed-edition portfolio made up of each student’s interpretation of the main character, Medea. Every student will receive a portfolio containing a print of each student’s drawing of Medea. We will also distribute copies of the portfolio to select members of the College community. Information and experience gained in this course can be used to produce a professional portfolio or film reel, the invention of characters for future animations and graphic novels, or the execution of serial drawings.

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Experimental Animation: Materials and Methods

Open , Seminar—Spring

Animation is the magic of giving life to objects and materials through motion. Whether through linear storytelling or conceptual drive, a sense of wonder is achieved with materials, movement, and transformation. In this class, students will learn the fundamentals of making animated films in a hands-on workshop environment in which we are actively creating during class meetings and labs. The class will include instruction in a variety of under-camera, stop-motion techniques, including: cut-out paper animation, paint on glass, sequential drawing using pencil and paper or chalk boards, sand animation, and simple object and puppet animation. We will cover all aspects of progressive movement, especially the laying out of ideas through time and the development of convincing character and motion. The course will cover basic design techniques and considerations, including materials, execution, and color. We will also have a foundational study of the history of experimental animation by viewing the historical animated film work of artists from around the globe. During the semester, each student will complete five short, animated films ranging in length from 30 seconds to one minute. Students are required to provide their own external hard drives and some additional art materials. Software instruction will include AfterEffects, Adobe Premier, and Dragonframe.

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Avant Doc: Experiments in Documentary Filmmaking

Open , Seminar—Spring

No prior film experience is required, though some knowledge of film editing would be advantageous.

In this course, we will examine experimental documentary form as political/social/personal discourse and practice. We take as a starting point avant-garde documentary production and explore it in the manner that theorist Renov defines as “the rigorous investigation of aesthetic forms, their composition and function” and the manner in which “poetics confront the problematics of power....” Throughout the semester, students will produce a series of experimental film exercises while they simultaneously research and produce a single, short experimental documentary film for conference work. This class will acquaint students with the
basic theory and purpose of experimental film/video, as compared to narrative documentary formats, and to critical methodologies that will help establish aesthetic designs for their own work. In the class, we will survey a wide range of avant-garde documentary films from the 1920s to the present, with the central focus being student’s options for film production in the context of political and cultural concerns. The various practices of experimental documentary film speak to a range of possibilities for what a movie might be. Within these practices, issues such as whose voices are heard and who is represented become of crucial importance.

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Environmental 3D Modeling for Animation

Open , Small seminar—Year

In this class, students will be introduced to the theory and practice of three-dimensional (3D) modeling and compositing for animation. We will explore 3D animation, design, and architectural concepts in the lecture room, on the computer, and in the studio. The purpose of this class is to build the skills necessary to leverage the use of a professional 3D program (Cinema 4D) in storytelling and animation projects and to develop a critical dialogue with the medium through selected essays and topics. Instructional topics include: 3D navigation, primitives, polygon modeling, symmetries, splines, rendering, keyframe animation, lighting, morphing, expressions, rigging, texturing, and compositing. The course will also cover compositing 2D animation with 3D animation and live-action footage using After Effects. Weekly assignments, along with longer projects, will provide students with the building blocks necessary to take their projects in individual creative directions. Cinema 4D is an industry-standard 3D design-and-animation software package used in a wide range of projects, from motion graphics to full-length feature films to experimental animation.

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Interactive Storytelling

Open , Seminar—Year

This course will explore adaptive and nonlinear narratives. We will focus on each student developing interactive stories, utilizing a video game engine to focus on new techniques in narrative development. The class will examine works such as visual novels, video games, virtual reality, and artworks to understand how viewer choice is becoming integral to the way we digest media. Examples of work that will be analyzed will be contemporary art, such as that by Lynn Hershman Leeson, and interactive films/games such as “Gone Home” and “What Remains of Edith Finch?” This course will utilize animation, film, and programming to develop collaborative projects. We will discuss the history of interactive media and read important essays in the development of the field. By the end of this class, students will be able to integrate audience participation and decision-making into the media of their choice. The course will utilize flow-chart software in the creation of these narratives, and the game engine Unity to deploy them. Unity is an industry-standard software in the development of video games and interactive media.

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The Art of Editing: Aesthetic and Practice

Open , Seminar—Fall

This course is open to students of all levels and requires no previous editing experience. Students must purchase a hard drive—specifications will be provided during the interview process.

In this course, we will examine the art and craft of motion-picture editing from both an aesthetic and a practical viewpoint. We will explore how the combination, order, and pacing of shots manage to convey both information and emotion. We will ask if and when a cut works and—equally important—when a cut works against the rhythm of the story. This course will serve students pursuing editing specifically but also filmmaking in general: Editing is the language of cinema. There will be screenings of films, both professional and student work, with an emphasis on their editing style. Examples may be drawn from films such as, but not limited to, Citizen Kane, Touch of Evil, Rope, Vertigo, Jaws, The Godfather, Apocalypse Now, Raging Bull, Amadeus, Requiem for a Dream, The Hurt Locker, Birdman, The Babadook, We Need to Talk About Kevin, Whiplash, and Arrival, among others. When possible, two different versions of a film will be shown to discuss how different editing choices affect the film’s emotional impact. We will also explore the tools of digital editing and how they can be used to achieve the filmmaker’s desired artistic results. Weekly assignments will provide students with the necessary building blocks and skill sets to see a project through from a hard drive of footage to a picture-locked film. Assignments will range from assistant editing techniques to editing scenes from both feature-length and short films. Technical instruction will focus on media management, import and organization, utilization of keywords and smart collections, syncing, basic timeline editing, split editing, sound editing, color correction, export, and delivery. Successful past conference projects have included provided stock short films, as well as the editing of short films produced by Sarah Lawrence College filmmaking students. Students in this course will primarily edit using DaVinci Resolve. Class participation is critical and expected.

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The Art of Editing: Post-Production

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

Students must purchase a hard drive; specifications will be provided during the interview process.

This course aims to build upon the work of the fall semester. It is expected that students will ideally have a rough cut but, at a minimum, access to a completely shot student film that they intend to edit as the core of their work for the semester. Students who did not take the fall course but who do have a film ready to cut may join the class with permission of the instructor. A rough cut is an opportunity for a new jumping off point. Dailies will be re-examined for “hidden gems,” little moments that may have been filmed unexpectedly or captured between takes. A deep review of this material can help the editor fully reveal a beat, flesh out a moment, or realize an emotion that the director may have wanted but was not fully achieved in the initial rough cut. Is this shot too long? Is this scene necessary? Is this emotional beat realized? The work of the editor is not to cut just to cut but often not to cut and to hold a shot. As editor Walter Murch says, “The editor is actually making 24 decisions a second: No. No. No. No. No. No. No. No. No. No. Yes!” The aim of this class is to do a deep-dive on an existing student project and make it as good as it can be. Students will polish a rough cut to picture-lock by the end of spring break so that the color grading and sound mix can be completed in time for the final class screening. Collaboration with students in other filmmaking courses will be encouraged and fostered. Specialized guest artists will be brought in as needed and where possible to provide expertise in focused areas. For the ambitious student, conference work may include editing multiple peer filmmaking projects from other production classes, re-editing films on which a student has worked, serving as an editor on the Sarah Lawrence College Web Series project or editing other material shot previously. Students will have the opportunity to screen their current projects in class and receive feedback, which will also show the class how a project evolves and comes together through editing over the length of the semester. Class participation is critical and expected. Students in this course will primarily edit using DaVinci Resolve.

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Working With Light and Shadow

Open , Seminar—Fall

This introductory course will present students with the basics of cinematography and film production. Students will explore cinematography as an art of visual storytelling. The cinematographer plays a critical role in shaping the light and composition of an image and capturing that image for the screen. Students will investigate the theory and practice of this unique visual language and its power as a narrative element in cinema. In addition to covering camera operation, students will explore composition, visual style, and the overall operation of lighting and grip equipment. In the first semester, students will work together on scenes that are directed and produced in class and geared toward the training of set etiquette, production language, and workflow. Work will include the re-creation of classic film scenes, with an emphasis on visual style. Students will discuss their work and give feedback that will be incorporated into the next project. For conference, students will be required to produce a second scene re-creation, incorporating elements discussed throughout the term. This is an intensive, hands-on workshop that immerses the student in all aspects of film production. By the end of the course, students should feel confident to approach a film production project with enough experience to take on introductory positions with the potential for growth.

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Cinematography: Color, Composition, and Style

Open , Seminar—Spring

This course will explore the roles associated with film production, focusing on cinematography and lighting for the screen. In addition to covering camera operation and basic lighting techniques, students will explore composition, color palettes, and application of a visual style to enhance the story. Students will produce scenes, in class, on a weekly basis. Work will be discussed and notes incorporated into the next project. Students will be required to produce a short project in addition to the work completed during class times, incorporating elements discussed throughout the semester as part of conference work. Students will develop, write, draw floor plans, shoot, edit, and screen a final project by the end of the term. This is an intensive, hands-on workshop that immerses the student in all aspects of film production. By the end of the course, students should feel confident enough to approach a film production project with the experience to take on introductory and assistant positions with the potential for growth.

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Writing the Short Screenplay

Open , Seminar—Fall

The goal of this class is to develop, write, and workshop a short screenplay—up to 15 pages. Students will pitch stories in an open, roundtable process that will provide an opportunity for them to understand the potential and feasibility of their ideas. The class will explore the elements of screenwriting, including: story structure, character development through action (behavior) and dialogue, visual storytelling, and point of view in order to expand and deepen the writer’s narrative craft. We will schedule readings of at least three screenplays each week, followed by critique and discussion of the work. The course will culminate in “table reads” of each screenplay, a process that allows the writer to hear his/her work read aloud by classmate/actors in each role, leading to a final production-ready draft. For conference, students may choose between developing another idea for a short script or long-form screenplay. Those who need extra attention to make their in-class projects production-ready by the end of the semester may also receive that opportunity in conference.

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Writing for the Screen

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

The landscape for the screenwriter has dramatically changed during the past several years, with new opportunities to write producible short films, YouTube® sketches, and Web series seen by millions of viewers, as well as long-form “films” or “movies” initially conceived for—and destined for—the “silver screen,” a screen that is seemingly changing in color, size, and setting on a daily basis. The disarray of the current film industry has created confusion and opportunity. Nevertheless, the baseline expectation in the contemporary narrative “film form” still remains: It is the expression of a character or characters progressing through a structured journey or series thereof. Designed for the emerging contemporary screenwriter with some screenwriting experience, the course includes opportunities for those creating a new idea, adapting original material into the screenplay form, rewriting a screenplay or Web series, or finishing a screenplay-in-progress destined for whatever screen or screens s/he aims to assail. The course will build upon previous classes and sharpen one’s storytelling skills. A review of screenwriting fundamentals during the first few weeks, as well as a discussion of the state of each project, will be followed by an intense screenwriting workshop experience with structured feedback from instructor and peers. Published screenplays, several useful texts, and clips of films and Web series will form a body of examples to help concretize aspects of the art and craft. Conference will most often be devoted to individualized work on the in-class project but may also include the exploration of other pieces of writing for the screen, as agreed upon by student and professor.

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Script to Screen

Open , Seminar—Year

This class will introduce students to all aspects of filmmaking, from conceiving a script through exhibition of the final work. The first semester will focus on screenwriting, and students will write short scripts that they will then produce and direct in the second semester. Simultaneously, students will learn to use the school’s filmmaking equipment and editing software and utilize those skills in a series of short, targeted video exercises. Those exercises will not only familiarize the students with the gear at their disposal but also will introduce the students to concepts of visual storytelling (e.g., where to put the camera to tell the story). The second semester will focus on preproduction and previsualization of the student’s conference film. Students will learn how to craft shot lists, floor plans, look books, and other tools to help them organize their film shoots. Students will also practice directing actors and finding a method for effective communication with their cast. They will also learn some basic production management skills, such as breaking down scripts for production and scheduling. After shooting their conference films, students will workshop their rough cuts in the classroom and fine-tune their edits in preparation for the final class: THE SCREENING!

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Writing Movies

Open , Seminar—Fall

During the course of this seminar/workshop, students will learn how to write narrative screenplays with an eye toward completing a feature-length work. The course will cover basics of format and style, and there will be weekly assignments aimed at developing students’ screenwriting muscles. Students will “pitch” ideas, rigorously outline stories, and write and revise pages of their blueprint for a feature-length film. The class is designed to help the beginning screenwriter find his or her voice as a film artist, using the written language of visual storytelling.

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Do-It-Yourself Filmmaking: No-Budget Strategies for Getting It Done

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

Has there ever been a better time to be a no-budget filmmaker? Recent technological advancements in camera and editing equipment have made it possible for just about anyone to create slick, high-resolution images for very little money. As films get easier to produce, however, good films become harder to find. So, how does the nascent filmmaker distinguish his/her work from the crowd? With a great script, sure-footed direction, and a smart allocation of his/her available resources. In this immersive filmmaking workshop, students will develop and shoot a project over the course of the semester. First, we’ll discuss scripts not only in terms of their story but also in terms of their scope and their producability. Then, we’ll practice our directing skills with a series of weekly shooting assignments that target specific directorial challenges. Next, we’ll break down our scripts for production, figuring out low-cost ways to achieve various cinematic effects. Our next step will be to previsualize the film by making shot lists, floor plans, and look books. Students will then go out and shoot their films and bring back the footage for editing. We’ll review basic post-production procedures and introduce software effects that can add polish to a project without adding cost. The goal of the course is to push the student creatively without multiplying costs beyond what is necessary. With the school’s equipment and other resources at your disposal, the only limitation to you as a filmmaker is your imagination and resourcefulness.

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Writing for Television: From Spec Script to Original TV Pilot

Intermediate , Seminar—Year

The fundamental skill of successful television writers is the ability to craft entertaining and compelling stories for characters, worlds, and situations that have been created by others. Though dozens of writers may work on a show over the course of its run, the “voice” of the show is unified and singular. The best way to learn to write for television—and a mandatory component of your portfolio for agents, managers, showrunners, and producers—is to draft a sample episode of a pre-existing show, known as a “spec script.” Developing, pitching, writing, and rewriting stories hundreds of times, extremely quickly, in collaboration, and on tight deadlines is what TV writers on staff do every day, fitting each episode seamlessly into the series as a whole in tone, concept, and execution. This workshop will introduce students to those fundamental skills by taking them, step-by-step, through the writing of their own spec (sample) script for an ongoing dramatic television series. The fall will take students through the spec script process, from premise lines, through the outline/beat sheet, to writing a complete draft of a full one-hour teleplay for a currently airing show. No original pilots will be pursued in the fall. In conference, students will work in depth through additional drafts of their script pages. In this class, there will be heavy TV viewing in the first third of the semester, as students “learn” the shows that are spec-ed in this class. In the spring, the class builds on fundamentals learned in the fall, now with the focus on creating an original TV pilot. Students will hone concepts, develop characters, and generate beat sheets and pages to create and write an original one-hour or half-hour show (no three-camera sitcoms). Focusing on engineering story machines, we power characters and situations with enough conflict to generate episodes over many years. In conference, students may wish to craft another spec script, begin to develop characters and a series "bible" for their original show, or work on previously developed material. Prospective students are expected to have an extensive working knowledge across many genres of TV shows that have aired domestically during the past several decades.

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Screenwriting Through the Director’s Lens

Open , Seminar—Fall

Effective screenwriting requires an understanding of story structure and an ability to shape character, theme, tone, and incident to dramatic effect. For the director, screenwriting provides an opportunity to start anticipating the specific needs and dynamics of production, especially for casting, locations, design, cinematography, scene blocking, and more. A film director takes the screenplay as a starting point for understanding complex characters and relationship dynamics. Story is about character, and character is action. A director uses a script as a blueprint for the production, where the collaborators work to enlarge upon the script to tell an original story by creating conditions that facilitate each of the collaborators’ best work. Through those interactions with actors, the cinematographer, producers, production designer, and key set personnel, the director works to draw everyone’s creative work into a unified and expressive whole. A director who has written the script is deeply immersed in the world of the film and can draw upon that intimate knowledge to inform every discussion with actors and other collaborators throughout the process of preparation, production, and post-production. It is said that every film is made (at least) three times—through screenwriting, production, and post-production. A director can, therefore, use the screenwriting process to great advantage, as a safe and open platform to imagine every detail of the unfolding vision for a film. Screenwriting provides plenty of room for trial and error, as characters take on a life of their own. This class will focus on the practice of screenwriting from a director’s unique point of view. Students who do not wish to direct are also welcomed to participate, since they can surely find value—just as a director who never intends to act can benefit from taking acting classes. Students will be encouraged to dig deeply into their stories, conducting ancillary research and keeping notebooks to which they can turn for new ideas during the revision process. Special consideration will be given to questions of character psychology and narrative perspective. Students may work on whatever interests them, whether it’s short or feature-length film screenplays, TV pilots, Web series, or something unique. Class activities will include writing exercises, discussions of exemplary scripts circulated for study, and critiques of each other’s work. Out-of-class work will focus on reading and screening assignments and regular revision of your scripts to maximum impact.

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Martin Eden Post-Production

Advanced , Seminar—Fall

Previous film production and/or screenwriting experience are desirable.

Last winter and spring, Sarah Lawrence students joined peers from 10 other colleges to produce a film based on Jack London’s autobiographical novel, Martin Eden. During the spring 2018 semester, Sarah Lawrence students joined a college class on adaptation for the screen to develop the first draft screenplay. It is in the spirit of these experiential learning projects that we’ll open the Martin Eden post-production process to student input, participation, and learning. This class will focus on the week-to-week work that is required to complete Martin Eden post-production. Among the activities planned: weekly edit critiques and revisions, fine cutting, sound design and Foley production, music scoring and recording, preparation and production of additional dialogue recording (ADR), preparation and production of visual effects, sound mixing, and color correction. Additional activity will include preparation of marketing materials for release and development of a festival and release strategy. Students will meet each week in class and in a group conference to connect to these processes, which will be in progress. The instructor will present the current state of post-production for theoretical discussion, practical review, and hands-on workshopping. Students will take on out-of-class assignments related to various aspects and needs for that work-in-progress and will make presentations to the rest of the class for further critique and to advance the completion of the film. Students will also review other assigned film scenes and sequences—and complete films—to consider the impact of post-production on them. Visiting artists will be brought in to provide input, critique, and practical guidance for certain aspects of the post-production. An example: A Foley artist will be contracted to help chart and supervise student work in that area. The study and process of post-production provides a good opportunity to advance as an editor, sound designer, director, script supervisor, Foley artist, and more.

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The Writer and the Director: Translating the Scene

Open , Seminar—Spring

No previous experience in writing or directing is required.

Writers and directors are often considered to be of two different camps—or, at the very least, wearing different creative hats—depending upon what part of the process they find themselves within. And indeed, how does a director take the words on the screenplay page and realize them in a film scene? And coming from the writer’s angle, how does one create useful words on the screenplay page that evoke what is intended to end up on the screen? Every screenwriter needs to think like a director. Every director needs to be skilled at translating the text of the screenplay into the film that is intended. This class will provide an in-depth exploration into processes that a director may utilize in order to develop and actualize his/her vision of a scene as written on the pages of the screenplay. In kind, we will also study the elements that can inform the process of the writer, eager to understand how his/her pages can create the intended result on the screen. In some cases, we’ll see that the text can be clean and useful; in others, the text may be too rich or too spare or, in any case, somehow lacking. The real work of the writer and of the director is to understand the intent of the action in a scene’s text and to strategize how to realize the scene for maximum impact. Of course, particularly in today’s landscape, the writer and director can often be the same person. In any event, a filmmaker (writer and/or director) can enhance his/her overall skills by looking at the process through both lenses. In this class, we’ll view films, organize in-class exercises, and use published screenplays to immerse ourselves in the process of interpreting the text and preparing it for the screen. This will include the crucial work required of any writer and/or director: screenplay scene analysis, interpretation and breakdown, character development, and how to access and communicate visual ideas for the look of the film. We’ll study camera styles and movement in order to decide how best to visually realize the screenplay through your shot selection. We’ll also consider staging, casting, and other elements that create your film’s mise en scene. Each student will pursue a series of exercises, culminating in the preparation, directing, shooting, and editing of two scenes using published screenplays. For the first exercise, you’ll take a simple scene from a published script (a private moment, without dialogue) and develop characters through cinematic storytelling. For your second exercise, you will take another simple scene, with dialogue, from the same screenplay in order to experiment with all of the ideas developed throughout the class. As a writing and directing “methods” class, the aim is not to make a short film but rather to translate scene work from an existent published screenplay and determine how to articulate the dramatic action of the characters in the context of an overall sequence—or several connected scenes. The screen material generated will have less emphasis on production design, wardrobe, props, and locations. Instead, students will focus on the dramatic and emotional action of the characters within a scene. In conference, students may pursue the writing of original scene work, the writing of a short script, or the expansion of a screenplay in development. With the permission of the professor, students may seek to shoot a scene from their original material to be delivered as part of their final conference work. Once again, the focus of the class is on the realization of scene work through process and methodology rather than the creation of a short film. Technical labs will be included for those who require instruction in the basic use of camera equipment, lighting, sound, and editing.

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Creating the Web Series

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

Students should have some previous experience in acting, screenwriting, and/or some aspect of film production.

The rise of the Internet has given birth to new media forms—including the Web series, with its elastic structure, character-driven original stories, short episodes, cultural specificity, and emphasis on writing and performance. In this class, students will start from scratch to develop, write, and produce several original Web series during the course of the semester. Students will work in all positions, as producers, writers, directors, actors, editors, cinematographers, sound recordists, and more. We’ll use some class time to actually shoot episodes, with additional work expected outside of class. As part of conferences, we’ll hold weekly group working dialogues and critique sessions. We’ll also hold screenings and discussion of sample material to better understand the world of the Web series. Students can outline and present their own character and story ideas during pitch sessions. From there, we'll advance to episode writing, casting, rehearsals, pre-production, production, and post-production. In class, we’ll also develop and interpret the text for every aspect of each episode and prepare it for production. We’ll conduct close scene analysis, interpretation, and breakdown. We’ll track character intentions and development for writers and actors and discuss best practices to plan and communicate both performance strategies and visual ideas for the look of each episode. We’ll study camera styles and movement in order to decide how best to visually realize your scripts through shot selection. We’ll also consider blocking, design, and other elements that create your film’s mise en scene. During group sessions, we’ll critique each finished episode and, where appropriate, plan to reshoot certain scenes based on input. The Web series is a good format for young filmmakers, writers, and actors to show what you can do—and get on screen. As in any kind of narrative filmmaking, the challenge will be to develop a fresh story and then animate and enlarge the text through imaginative performance, cinematography, design, sound, and editing. We imagine two production teams that will each produce two 20-minute series during the semester. We currently plan to shoot episodes in and around the DeCarlo Performing Arts Center. Teams may switch members from time to time to maximize opportunities for fresh collaboration. Outcomes will vary, with campus screenings and, possibly, online postings and entry into festivals.

Faculty

Directing the Scene for Film and TV: The Process

Intermediate , Small seminar—Fall

Prior experience with filmmaking and/or film classes is required.

This course is a hands-on introduction to directing narrative in film and television. The classes will consist of a discussion with clips on an aspect of directing, followed by exercises with simple, open scenes to be shot by students in class the same week. Among the topics that we’ll explore are subtext, staging, directing the actor, creating identification with a character, camera (shots and movement), creating a visual language, subjectivity, and directorial POV. The class is a directing class with a focus on scene work rather than a filmmaking class in which one makes a short film. In addition to the in-class exercises mentioned above, students will be required to break down the script of a two-character scene, then direct it in class having cast and rehearsed it ahead of time. Students will then shoot and edit that scene outside of class and present it to the class toward the end of the semester. Additionally, there will be reading and viewing assignments, as well as a thorough analysis of a scene from an existing film—exploring the directorial choices that make the scene work. Conference includes the work on the scene that you will shoot, as well as the scene that you will analyze, as well as questions that come up about directing narrative.

Faculty

Producing for Filmmakers, Screenwriters, and Directors

Open , Seminar—Fall

Tech Lab: Wednesday 6 pm to 8 pm Heimbold 136 (Ziskin). This lab may not meet every week, but students should have this time available for labs to be scheduled at the discretion of the professor. 

What is a producer? Producers are credited on every film, television show, and media project made. They are crucial—even seminal—to each and every production, no matter how big or small. Yet, even as a pivotal position in the creative and practical process of making a film, TV show, or digital project, the title “producer” is perhaps the least understood of all of the collaborators involved. This course demystifies and answers this question, examining what a producer actually does in the creation of screen-based media and the many hats one or a small army of producers may wear at any given time. Students will explore the role of the producer in the filmmaking, television, and digital process from the moment of creative inspiration through project delivery. Students will gain hands-on producing experience through nuts-and-bolts production software exercises, breaking projects down into production elements, script breakdowns, schedules and budgets, logline, synopsis and treatment writing, script coverage, and final in-class project presentations. Course work includes written and verbal assignments, in-class presentations, readings, screenings, and assignments based on invited industry guests. Conference work may include producing a film or media project by a student in another Sarah Lawrence College filmmaking-production class, research-based papers, in-depth case studies, and other producer-related projects. The course provides real-world producing guidance and offers filmmakers, screenwriters, and directors a window into the importance of—and mechanics pertaining to—the producing discipline, as well as a practical skill set for creating and seeking work in the filmmaking, TV, and digital content world after Sarah Lawrence College. Software labs are required.

Faculty

Writing the Documentary

Open , Seminar—Fall

No script? No actors? No problem. Documentary storytelling is in its golden age, and the entertainment world has become ensorcelled with documentary film. Is it because of the universal human desire to tell true stories? Is it because the truth is sometimes more compelling and stranger than fiction? Is it because documentaries embody and deliver powerful dramatic narratives rivaled by the best of scripted media? This course introduces the student to the adventurous and intriguing world of documentaries from the earliest recorded masterpieces to today’s box-office breakout hits while exploring everything in between. In addition to immersion in the passionate and rewarding dominion of all genres of documentaries—ranging from experimental, poetic, expository, observational, participatory, reflexive, and performative to screenings, readings, and practical exercises—students will learn the craft of writing for documentary before, during, and after production, including how to identify, develop, and clarify themes and ideas and write loglines, synopses, artistic statements, impact statements, narrations, and subject interview questions.

Faculty

Art and Craft of Development and Pitching for Film and TV

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

The first step in getting any project made is having the goods—a screenplay, an original TV pilot, episodes of a Web series, a short film, a documentary treatment or proposal—and then developing a rock-solid pitch. There is, indeed, a right way to pitch your ideas and projects. This course teaches students how to develop a project into a pitch package and how to pitch that project—an essential skill for all writers, filmmakers, directors, and producers. With existing scripts and projects, this class guides students in how to understand studio and network needs, how to ensure that your script is ready to pitch, how to establish industry contacts, how to be a good communicator, how to understand and grapple with changing audience tastes, and, overall, how to sell your idea. Every development executive is looking for great stories and screenplays that will make successful films, TV shows, and digital content. This course coaches students to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of their scripts, treatments, and projects and explore what platform will best suit their project—and why? What kind of viewer will it appeal to? Is it practical? Has it been done before? Answering some of these questions will aid students in understanding the practicalities of development. Through a workshop process of analyzing scripts, creating pitch packages, and verbal pitching, students will learn what makes their particular project marketable, how to make their stories resonate, and how to engage with and pitch the gatekeepers of the myriad platforms where audiences seek stories on screen. Students should have a completed project for which they wish to develop a pitch.

Faculty

Directing the Documentary

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

This course introduces the student to the adventurous and intriguing world of directing documentaries, from exploring the earliest recorded masterpieces to today’s box-office breakout hits and everything in between. In addition to immersion in the passionate and rewarding dominion of documentaries through screenings, readings, and practical filmmaking exercises—and with a deep understanding of documentary styles, including experimental, poetic, expository, observational, participatory, reflexive, and performative and how these styles often overlap in documentary film—students will learn the craft of documentary filmmaking and directing for documentary. Through hands-on exercises and workshops, students will explore camera work, shooting styles, lighting, interview techniques, and editorial, graphic, and post-production skills. Students will complete the course having written, conceived, filmed, directed, produced, and edited a short, three-to-five minute documentary.

Faculty

The Actor’s Voice Over: An Intensive Exploration of Voice Work

Open , Seminar—Year

This class will meet once a week for three hours in the Heimbold Sound Booth.

Have you ever wondered who performs the voices that you encounter in your everyday life? You spend a portion of each day listening, waiting, and learning from these voices—the familiar voices you hear when watching television commercials, the annoying voice that tells you to hold and that your call is important. Voices are everywhere. These voices are created by performers. You hear them in the narration of documentaries, television and radio commercials, animation, graphic novels, video games, phone applications, podcasts, audio books, audio tours, tutorials, and PSAs. In each class session, students will work with a sound editor on a variety of projects—from film and television to commercial spokesperson copy, group ADR, ambience, (wala wala)—creating believable character voices for animation. Students will also investigate breathing and relaxation techniques, appropriate pacing, enunciation, flexibility, and clarity. Facilitating vocal and improvisational exercises, the students will develop what will become their signature voice, as well as investigate and develop character voices for animation. Students will also write original material to be performed and recorded. Conference work will involve specific readings covering the historical aspects of post-production work in film. The student and the professor will decide on a specific aspect of film production work to further investigate.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Less is More: On Camera Performance

Open , Seminar—Year

This course will focus on both the natural and technical aspects of camera performance. The student will learn how to create living, breathing characters constructed and crafted with an emotional inner life that is supported through organic impulses and analytical comprehension of text. The work will require concentrated attention and expansion of emotional perceptions. The student will develop the ability to actively listen and not to anticipate the resolution but, rather, to discover it in the moment. The scene work will be taken from published screenplays. The students will cold read the material and then memorize, rehearse, and further investigate character using improvisational and emotional exercises. Students will learn how much physicality is required for the various shots that make up the scene and learn how to harness the physical and emotional focus for extreme close-up work. There is the required movement aspect to this workshop, as well. Each session will begin with physical and emotional exercises that will allow the performers to move, to breathe, and to play. During the filming sessions, the students will have the opportunity to investigate sound, lighting, and editing. Voice-over and ADR skills will also be explored. Students are required to write original monologues and short original scenes that will be filmed during the spring semester. The scenes will be shot in a workshop atmosphere that concentrates on performance rather than production value. This course of study is equally valuable to the emerging performer, director, or screenwriter seeking to understand the alchemy of performance for the camera.

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Related Disciplines

First-Year Studies: Histories and Theories of Photography

Open , FYS—Year

What is a photograph? This course looks at that question from many different vantage points, including photography theory, social history, art history, media theory, and material culture studies. How is a photograph both a transcription of the world—an index, decal, or one-to-one transfer of a thing—and a representation, a culturally-encoded image that tells us about how we see ourselves and others in the world? We each hold thousands of photographs on our phones, but they are digital, disembodied, and dematerialized images that are simultaneously everywhere and nowhere. What can the history of photography (from 1839 to the present) teach us about the medium’s materiality—or how photographs were to be found in albums, lavish frames, photobooks, archives, the wall in a museum, or as slides projected on a screen? What do these material histories tell us about what photography was—and now is? This course will look closely at specific themes within the history and theory of photography, including: documentary aesthetics and discourses of colonization; photography’s archival practices and forms of social control; identity politics and the photographic representation of visibility; digitization and contemporary photography; globalization, labor, and photojournalism; and the ethics and politics of the photography of war and violence. Not a comprehensive survey, this course instead looks at focused case studies structured chronologically. We will do close readings of theoretical and primary source texts and consider scholarly, literary, and aesthetic texts. The course also places strong emphasis on what it means to write about and describe photographs. Whenever possible, we will look at photographs in person. Individual conference meetings will alternate biweekly with group activities that may include field trips to New York City collections, writing workshops, and research sessions in the library.

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Related Disciplines

First-Year Studies: Introduction to Environmental Studies: Cultures of Nature

Open , FYS—Year

In a time of extreme environmental events that include climate change, rising sea levels, flooding, toxics, and radiation, environmental imagery is part of the fabric of daily life and communication: on the Web, on television, in newspapers, and in advertisements. Images of sea rise, genetically modified salmon, or landscapes of environmental devastation in Africa are found in the subway and in Benetton ads, as well as on the front pages of The New York Times and in social media. Representations of nature are not restricted, however, to popular media and texts. They also form the terrain for scientific contestation, debate about environmental ethics, and “high” policy formulation. This FYS seminar introduces students to the insights and methods of environmental humanities, environmental history, science studies, and political ecology. How do stories, images, and maps of nature shape perceptions and practices of environmental management? How is the same patch of “nature” imagined and described by differently positioned observers? How are environmental representations, historical contexts, facts, and rhetoric linked? How are particular forms of environmental representation used? By whom? Where? To what ends? In a time of extreme environmental events, sometimes called the Anthropocene, how are ideas of nature, ecology, and environmental futures changing? How are ideas of resilience now shaping the visions and material interventions of architects, engineers, landscape architects, and urban planners? How do works of fiction, nonfiction, film, and other arts encourage imaginative interventions in an era of increasing environmental risk? In the fall, students will alternate biweekly conferences with biweekly small-group activities. In the spring, students will attend conferences on alternate weeks.

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Related Disciplines

Introduction to Animation Studies

Open , Lecture—Fall

Students who are interested in pursuing a film-making project for their final project have the option of registering for this class under Filmmaking and Moving Image Arts.

To animate is to bring to life, to instill movement into that which would otherwise be still. Animated films grant their viewers access to imaginary worlds that are frequently populated by anthropomorphic animals, fantastical environments, and utopian societies. But animation takes many forms. This course offers a broad survey of the global history of animation by embracing the diversity of those forms and by encouraging students to draw connections between the techniques and materials employed by animators and the political, social, and cultural functions of animated texts. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of ways in which animation has historically been created, including works made with sand, paper, puppets, pixels, clay, cels, pinscreens, garbage, and other unconventional materials. Along the way, students will familiarize themselves with key films, filmmakers, filmic technologies, and filmmaking traditions by studying animation from various eras, genres, industries, and countries. In addition to featuring numerous works from Japan and the United States, weekly screenings will incorporate animated shorts and feature films from many different regions, including Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Iran, Korea, Mexico, Poland, Russia, and Swaziland. In-class discussions and course assignments will urge students to grapple with complex questions and issues in the field of animation studies.

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Related Disciplines

Women Make Movies, or Why Gender Representation Really Matters Behind and In Front of the Camera

Open , Seminar—Spring

Students should have some prior background in film history or in women's studies to take this seminar.

Today women directors still have a hard time breaking through to receive recognition and steady funding. In fact, according to the Celluloid Ceiling Report, in 2016 women comprised just seven percent of directors of the top grossing 250 films in the United States—a two percent decrease from the previous year. This seminar will offer a historical, international survey of women filmmakers up to the present. In conjunction with certain feminist readings, we will consider the historical reasons for the slow emergence of women as creators, beginning with Linda Nochlin’s influential essay, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” (1971). And beginning with Alice Guy-Blaché, the class will survey some of the best films by women directors. We will also consider the success rate for women directors in other countries, notably Morocco, where women directors have won four times the top award in 17 editions. Germaine Dulac, Dorothy Arzner, Maya Deren, Leni Riefenstahl, Agnès Varda, Claire Denis, Chantal Akerman, Ava DuVernay, Mahassine El Hachadi, Margarethe von Trotta, Andrea Arnold, Sally Potter, Marjane Satrapi, Jane Campion, Célina Sciamma, Isabelle Adjani, Patty Jenkins, Anne-Marie Miéville, Gurinda Chada, Mélanie Laurent, Kathryn Bigelow, Sofia Coppola, Mira Nair, Julie Dash, Diane Kurys, Lina Wertmüller, Margarethe von Trotta, Lynne Ramsay, Simone Bitton, Farida Benlyazid, and Agnieszka Holland are some of the filmmakers whom we’ll consider both in class and for individual conference projects.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Advanced Italian: Fascism, World War II, and the Resistance in 20th-Century Italian Narrative and Cinema

Advanced , Seminar—Year

This course is intended for advanced students of Italian who want to better their comprehension, as well as their oral and written skills, in the language and their knowledge of Italian literature. This will be achieved by reading literary works and watching films in the original language, producing written compositions, and also through in-class discussion of the material. The course examines the manner in which crucial historical events that occurred during the 20th century—specifically the rise and fall of fascism, World War II, and the Resistance—were represented within Italian literature and cinema of the time, as well as throughout the decades following the end of the war (up to the 1970s). Literary texts will include those authored by Ignazio Silone, Vasco Pratolini, Italo Calvino, Mario Carli, Renata Viganò, Carlo Cassola, Beppe Fenoglio, Elio Vittorini, Alberto Moravia, and Carlo Mazzantini. Films will include fascist propaganda and documentaries (from the Istituto Luce’s archives), as well as films by Roberto Rossellini (his fascist-era War trilogy, as well as his neorealist films), Vittorio De Sica, Luigi Comencini, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, Bernardo Bertolucci, Giuliano Montaldo, Ettore Scola, Luchino Visconti, Liliana Cavani, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Federico Fellini. Conference topics might include the study of a particular author, literary text, or film that might be of interest to the student. When appropriate, students will be directed to specific internship opportunities in the New York area centered on Italian language and culture. Literary texts will be on reserve in the library or available for purchase; critical material will be available through MySLC. Conversation classes (in small groups) will be held twice a week with the language assistant; students will have the opportunity to reinforce what they have learned in class and hone their ability to communicate in Italian.

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The Creative Process: Influence and Resonance

Advanced , 3-credit seminar—Spring

Students may choose to take this course for creative arts credit (creative final project) or humanities credit (final research paper). Permission of the instructor is required.

This seminar/workshop is for advanced students in all of the creative arts—composers, choreographers, writers, and visual artists—who are interested in the process of developing original material. There is no singular creative path, but each artist needs to confront the past in order to find a unique vision, a unique voice. We will examine various influences on creative thought, finding resonant clues and methods in areas outside of one’s chosen creative field. In each session, the point of departure will always begin with music where, for instance, “influence” may be understood as direct musical quotation from a specific composition or a structural idea based on a literary or visual image while “resonance” is about incorporating without actually imitating another composer’s particular sound or translating into music the color and texture of a painting. Since the world is rich with collaborative interconnections, we will explore everything that might have an impact on making new work—from musical antiquity to the far reaches of technology, as well as ritual and myth, the role of nature, art and architecture, literature, memory, politics and protest, nationalism, and global culture. Along with assigned readings and listening to and looking at various media, students will actively seek out and document sources of inspiration and will keep a journal in which they will record their personal experiences and working methods and insights into the creative process. Biweekly group conferences will serve as “open studios,” where individual projects or collaborative work will be explored. The term will culminate in class presentations of either a new work or an in-depth paper based on research.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

The Psychological Impact of Art

Open , Seminar—Spring

That’s one of the great things about music. You can sing a song to 85,000 people, and they’ll sing it back for 85,000 different reasons.—Dave Grohl.

The expressive arts bridge the gap between personal and collective experiences. Music, dance, literature, sculpture, and other creative pursuits allow artists a personal venue for intimate expression; but their products also have influence on thousands of others. Art evokes emotions, changes opinions, forges identities, and can be an anthem for social change. This class will explore how engagement with the arts influences who we are and how we relate to others. We will discuss the relative importance of the process of making art, versus the product itself, for personal growth and fostering social change. Although often thought of as a uniquely personal relationship, psychologists’ understanding of how the arts affect social, cognitive, and affective human behavior is expanding. In this class, students will be encouraged to engage critically with this psychological research and appreciate the difficulties associated with quantifying the impact of the arts.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Theories of the Creative Process

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

A background in college-level psychology, social science, or philosophy is required.

The creative process is paradoxical. It involves freedom and spontaneity yet requires expertise and hard work. The creative process is self-expressive yet tends to unfold most easily when the creator forgets about self. The creative process brings joy yet is fraught with fear, frustration, and even terror.The creative process is its own reward yet depends on social support and encouragement. In this class, we look at how various thinkers conceptualize the creative process—chiefly in the arts but in other domains, as well. We see how various psychological theorists describe the process, its source, its motivation, its roots in a particular domain or skill, its cultural context, and its developmental history in the life of the individual. Among the thinkers that we will consider are Freud, Jung, Arnheim, Franklin, and Gardner. Different theorists emphasize different aspects of the process. In particular, we see how some thinkers emphasize persistent work and expert knowledge as essential features while others emphasize the need for the psychic freedom to “let it happen” and speculate on what emerges when the creative person “lets go.” Still others identify cultural context or biological factors as critical. To concretize theoretical approaches, we look at how various ideas can contribute to understanding specific creative people and their work. In particular, we will consider works written by or about Picasso, Woolf, Welty, Darwin, and some contemporary artists and writers. Though creativity is most frequently explored in individuals, we also consider group improvisation in music and theatre. Some past conference projects have involved interviewing people engaged in creative work. Others consisted of library studies centering on the life and work of a particular creative person. Some students chose to do fieldwork at the Early Childhood Center and focus on an aspect of creative activity in young children.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

3D Modeling

Open , Seminar—Spring

This course introduces students to the process of constructing digital objects and environments in the virtual space of the computer. Emphasis will be on a strong grasp of form, space, and composition. Fundamentals of hard-edge and organic surface modeling will be thoroughly exercised, while further exploration of the digital tools will cover shading and texturing, lighting, and rendering with the virtual camera. Over the course of the semester, students will be challenged to create increasingly complex objects, environments, and imagery. Through readings and discussion, students will also be encouraged to consider the conceptual ramifications of working in computer space. Contemporary examples of computer-generated imagery in art, film, and media—juxtaposed with historical views on visual illusion from art and philosophy—will form a broader context in which to examine the medium.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Advanced Interdisciplinary Studio II

Advanced , Seminar—Spring

Open to juniors and seniors with extensive prior visual-art experience. Please bring examples of your work to the interview. Students interested in senior exhibitions are encouraged to interview.

This is a continuation of the fall-semester course and is intended for advanced visual arts students interested in pursuing their own art-making processes more fully. Students making work in painting, drawing, sculpture, video, mixed media, performance, etc. are supported. Students will maintain their own studio spaces and will be expected to work independently and creatively and to challenge themselves and their peers to explore new ways of thinking and making. During this spring semester, students will focus exclusively on their own interests and will be expected to develop a sophisticated, cohesive body of independent work accompanied by an artist’s statement and exhibition. We will have regular critiques, readings, image discussions, and trips to artist studios and will participate integrally with the Visual Arts Lecture Series. This will be an immersive studio course for disciplined art students interested in making art in an interdisciplinary environment.

Faculty
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Introduction to Digital Imaging

Open , Seminar—Fall

This course covers contemporary digital practice, with an emphasis on Photoshop skills and imaging techniques from scanning to printing. Proper digital workflow is the focus while working through the basics of image manipulation tools, color correction, and retouching. The skills covered will build a solid basis for further exploration of photography, fine-art printing, and more radical digital experiments. The broader classroom discussion emphasizes computer-generated and -manipulated imagery as a new paradigm in contemporary art, photography, and culture in general. Students are encouraged to explore the potential of digital tools in the context of their personal work—visual arts-related or otherwise—stressing open-ended visual possibilities, as well as technical and conceptual rigor.

Faculty
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Media Burn: Moving Image Installation in Practice

Open , Seminar—Year

This yearlong production seminar investigates histories, strategies, and concepts related to the production and exhibition of moving-image installation. Over the year, students will investigate the histories of moving-image installation and create their own works of time-based art. We will look at artworks that use moving images, space, sound, loops, performance, site-specificity, chance operations, multiple channels, and games as tools for communicating ideas. In the fall semester, our work will be inspired by close readings of specific seminal artworks in installation from the late 1960s to the present, including pieces that utilize feedback loops, multiple projections, home movies, and new technologies. Students will learn craft and concept simultaneously through collaborative and individual production. Spring semester, we will engage with our own concepts and ideas of how time-based installation can be activated. Site-specificity, social practice, and interdisciplinary projects are introduced, and students are encouraged to connect their conference in this class to collaborations in theatre, dance, sculpture, painting, and academics. Conference works involve research, craft, and rigorous conceptual and technical practice and are presented in exhibitions at the end of each semester. A component of the class will take place outside the classroom at museums, galleries, nonprofits, performance spaces, and historic sites in and around New York City. (The title of this class, Media Burn, comes from the 1975 performance by the San Francisco-based art collective Ant Farm, https://www.eai.org/titles/media-burn)

Faculty
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Our World, Other Worlds

Open , Seminar—Year

This is a writing course that explores the use of episodes in a world made of words. We read short stories, parts of novels, poems, newspaper articles, and essays from many times and worlds and occasionally watch episodes and films. We also do exercises designed to help practice character drawing, dialogue, pacing, composition, editing, and world building. Still, much of the work of the class involves writing episodes of a long work that becomes our conference work and can be completed in one or two semesters. These works are discussed in small groups, whose members become experts on each others’ creations. Many of the works take place in an imaginary world, some are memoirs, others go back and forth between worlds. The course is open but involves a willingness to enter sympathetically into someone else's work over time and to be an informed reader for that person. It also involves the ability to work on a piece of writing for at least a semester.

Faculty
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Poetry: What Holds the Unsayable

Open , Seminar—Spring

Poems are not merely feelings, the poet Ranier Maria Rilke has written, but experiences. What is the difference between a feeling and an experience? How can a poem become an experience? How can a poem, originating from the personal, transcend the personal? How can writing the poem transform the writer? Every poem holds the unsayable. How does a poem do that? How can we attempt to do that—using words? If you are interested in these questions, take this course. It is open to experienced writers, as well as to absolute beginners. If you are interested in these questions, you are welcome. This is a reading/writing course. We will spend time every week reading poems that have already been published (by dead poets and living poets) to see how they were made: music, syntax, line, sound, and image. We might spend time generating new work in class through exercises and experiments. And we will spend time looking closely at one another’s work, encouraging each other to take risks and move even closer to the mystery of the poem. Each writer in the class will meet with another class member once a week on a “poetry date.” Each writer will be responsible for reading the assigned work and for bringing to class one written offering each week. We will work hard, learn a great deal about poetry and about our own poems, and have a wonderful time.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Writing Our Moment

Open , Seminar—Spring

It would be safe to say that journalism and nonfiction writing are currently undergoing a transformation. Our most storied publications are in a state of crisis. Big-city newspapers are failing by the day. Magazines are imperiled. Book publishers face encroaching competition from handheld electronic devices and online search engines that do not recognize copyright laws. What is an ambitious, intuitive writer to do going forward? Quite simply, harness all of the strengths of the storytelling past to a new world of few space restrictions, more flexible tones, and the ready presence of video, audio, and animation—which can either enrich or encroach upon text—and comprehend the role of writer in such a way as to include and exploit new media. We will examine the relationship between literary nonfiction, which has always been cinematic in focus and flexible in tone, and the once and future practice of journalism. Masters of 20th-century nonfiction such as V. S. Naipaul, Truman Capote, Joseph Mitchell, and Roger Angell—steeped as they are in the journalistic practice of their time—can serve as guideposts to our uncertain future. We will examine, through reading and writing, the ways in which the formulas of journalism are transformed into literature. We will emphasize the importance of factuality and fact-checking and explore adapting modern storytelling to video, photography, and sound. As the semester progresses, literary nonfiction will be both discovered and reinvented to fit our new world.

Faculty
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