Juliana F. May

Undergraduate Discipline

Dance

BA, Oberlin College. MFA, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. A Guggenheim and NYFA Fellow, for the past 15 years she has taught dance and choreography at numerous institutions in am N-12 and university setting, including at Trevor Day School, Barnard College, The New School, and, most recently, at The American Dance Festival in Durham, North Carolina. She has created nine works since 2002, including seven evening-length pieces with commissions and encore performances from Dance Theatre Workshop, New York Live Arts, The Chocolate Factory Theatre, Barnard College, The New School, Joyce SoHo, and The American Realness Festival. She has been awarded grants and residencies through The Map Fund, The Jerome foundation, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and Gibney DIP. SLC, 2017–

Undergraduate Courses 2018-2019

Dance

Dance Making

Component—Year

Prerequisites: Dance Composition, Lighting Design and Stagecraft for Dance, and permission of the instructor.

In this class, graduates and upperclass undergraduates with a special interest and experience in dance composition will design and direct individual choreographic projects. Students and faculty will meet weekly to view works-in-progress and, in conferences taking place the following afternoon, discuss relevant artistic and practical problems. Music, costumes, lighting, and other elements will be discussed as integral and interdependent elements in the choreographic work. This will culminate in performances of the works toward the end of the semester in the Winter Performance and Spring Performance programs. Performances will take place in the Bessie Schönberg Dance Theatre or elsewhere on campus in the case of site-specific work.

Faculty

Previous Courses

The Choreographic Idiom: Instinct and Action in the Creative Process

Component—Year

This class will Interrogate the role of narrative, personal testimonial, and formal risk-taking in an effort to upend previous compositional habits and mine an interior space for dance making. Through a free associative languaging practice, elevated and action-based text work, and open improvisational scoring, this is a rare opportunity to explore the micro-interactions/inspirations and agitations of your work. Part of each day will be spent discussing each student’s current relationship to his/her creative process, as well as working inside a live “choreographic fishbowl” and watching each other work and giving direct feedback. This compression of a social and choreographic space allows the group to prioritize vulnerability and the unconscious as vital and critical points of initiation into the creative process.

Faculty