Myra Goldberg

BA, University of California–Berkeley. MA, City University of New York. Author of Whistling and Rosalind: A Family Romance; stories published in journals, including The Transatlantic Review, Ploughshares, Feminist Studies, The Massachusetts Review and The New England Review, and in the book anthologies Women in Literature, Powers of Desire, and The World’s Greatest Love Stories and elsewhere in the United States and France; nonfiction published in Village Voice and elsewhere; recipient of Lebensberger Foundation grant. SLC, 1985–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Writing

Our World, Other Worlds

Open , Seminar—Year

This course explores prose writing with an emphasis on the creation of a world. The writing can be fiction or nonfiction and can take place in this world, another, or several. We will explore ideas about this world and writing about this world and others and work on our writing to make it livelier and more real, no matter how imaginary our world is. This course runs in two parts, one semester each. You can take one or both parts. One part will involve writing episodes to build a world that, revised, will become a conference project; the other part will work on craft and content exercises of all kinds, with the conference project distinct from the exercises. Readings include folktales, religious writing, philosophy, fiction, and newspaper items.

Faculty

Words and Pictures

Open , Seminar—Year

This is a course with writing at its center and other arts—mainly, but not exclusively, visual—around it. We will read and look at all kinds of narratives, children’s books, folk tales, fairy tales, and graphic novels and try our hands at many of them. The reading tends to come from a wide range of times and places and includes everything from ancient Egyptian love poems to contemporary Latin American literature. For conference work, people have done graphic novels, animations, quilts, rock operas, items of clothing with text attached, nonfiction narratives that take a subject and explore it visually and in text, and distopian fictions with pictures. There will be weekly assignments that involve making something. This course is especially suited for students with an interest in some other art or body of knowledge that they would like to make accessible to nonspecialists. The spring semester will be similar in approach but with different assignments and texts. This course may be taken for one semester, either semester, or as a yearlong class.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Previous Courses

Our World, Other Worlds

Open , Seminar—Year

We will read written work that involves both the real world and several imaginary worlds and create our own with words, pictures, and "stuff." We will be looking at maps and other graphic representations of this world and other worlds and explore fantasy, fairy tales, religious stories, children's books, and audiobooks to see what other people have done. There will be weekly readings and exercises and a conference project. This course can be taken for one semester, either semester, or as a yearlong course.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Words and Pictures II

Open , Seminar—Spring

This is a course with writing at its center and other arts—mainly, but not exclusively, visual—around it. We will read and look at all kinds of narratives, children's books, folk tales, fairy tales, and graphic novels and try our hands at many of them. The reading tends to come from a wide range of times and places and includes everything from ancient Egyptian love poems to contemporary Latin American literature. For conference work, people have done graphic novels, animations, quilts, rock operas, items of clothing with texts attached, nonfiction narratives that take a subject and explore it visually and in text, and distopian fictions with pictures. There will be weekly assignments that involve making something. This course is especially suited for students with an interest in some other art or body of knowledge that they would like to make accessible to nonspecialists. The fall semester is similar in approach but with different assignments and texts.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Our World, Other Worlds II

Open , Seminar—Spring

Continuing our work in Our World, Other Worlds I, we will examine the imaginary in the real and the real in the imaginary. Again, we will be working in several realms: what is conventionally called fantasy, tale telling, children's literature, religious literature, and the making of worlds that look like this one. Weekly readings and exercises will be required, along with a conference project that creates a world.

Faculty

First-Year Studies in Writing

Open , FYS

This course takes the story as a fundamental way to integrate, remember, and communicate human experience and explores many ways of telling stories—long and short, orally, on paper, with pictures, in comics. Stories come mixed with fantasy and wisdom, poetry and realism; they are passed down as folk literature, family tales, soap operas and can be intended for everyone or for children, for teens or adults. This course identifies types of stories (quest, fable, slave tale, myth), contents of stories (births, deaths, marriages, friendships, journeys, losses), and forms of stories or collections (novel, tale, epic, episode) with a single author or a collective one as a place to stop and explore in our reading and in our work. There will be weekly reading and writing assignments and a conference project each semester.

Faculty