Peggy Gould

Anita Stafford Chair in Service Learning

on leave spring semester

BFA, MFA, New York University, Tisch School of the Arts. Certified teacher of Alexander Technique; assistant to Irene Dowd; private movement education practice in New York City. Other teaching affiliations: Smith College, The Ailey School/Fordham University, Dance Ireland/IMDT, 92nd St. Y/Harkness Dance Center, SUNY Purchase (summer), Jacob’s Pillow. Performances in works by Patricia Hoffbauer and George Emilio Sanchez, Sara Rudner, Joyce S. Lim, David Gordon, Ann Carlson, Charles Moulton, Neo Labos, T.W.E.E.D., Tony Kushner, Paula Josa-Jones. Choreography presented by Dixon Place, The Field, PS 122, BACA Downtown (New York City); Big Range Dance Festival (Houston); Phantom Theater (Warren, Vermont); Proctor’s Theatre (Schenectady, 2008/09 Dangerous Music Commission). Grants: Meet the Composer, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Harkness Dance Center. SLC, 1999–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Dance

Dance Movement Fundamentals

Component—Year

Movement and dancing are definitive signs of life! In every environment and at every level of existence, from single-cell organisms to entire populations, dancing is innate to living beings. This class is open to all interested participants, with no prior experience in dance required. The objective here is to awaken/reawaken students’ connection to movement as an elemental mode of human experience and learning. Students are introduced to some basic principles of dancing, as well as to strategies for preparing for dancing. Building fundamental skills for a wide range of movement studies, the focus is centered on learning movement and refining individual, partnered, and group performance in a variety of patterns and styles. Basic anatomical information is used to facilitate an understanding of dynamic alignment and movement potentials. Challenges in coordination, rhythm, range, and dynamic quality are systematically engaged, allowing students to gain strength, flexibility, endurance, balance, musicality, and awareness in the dance setting. While the primary emphasis is placed on learning structured material, improvisation and composition are incorporated to support students’ growing engagement with dance as an art form. Students who have successfully completed this course will be prepared to enter Contemporary Practice I and/or Ballet I.

Faculty

Conditioning for Dancers

Component—Year

Open to all students taking a Dance Third.

This course provides students with a weekly opportunity to explore and practice supplemental training strategies to support development of specialized skills required in dancing. Building on work done once or twice per semester in the Dance Practice Conferences, training issues such as strength, endurance, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness, and coordination will be addressed from a neuromuscular training approach based on the teachings and selected choreographies of Irene Dowd. In addition, students will be introduced to the Alexander Technique, which aims to refine and optimize function by eliminating excessive tension. This is accomplished through specific exercises and practices designed to increase awareness, implement conscious direction, and achieve gentle re-patterning of postural and movement habits.

Faculty

Dance Practice Conference

Component

Students taking Dance Thirds will meet with the instructor for this component course at least once per semester to address individual dance training issues and questions and to identify short- and long-term goals. Guided by discussion, we will develop practical strategies to address issues and questions in the context of achieving goals by means of specific supplemental exercises that address strength, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness, coordination, and effective approaches to learning. This course is designed to support and enhance students’ work in dance classes, rehearsals, and performances.

Faculty

Anatomy in Action

Component—Year

Students who wish to join this yearlong class in the second semester may do so only with the permission of the instructor.

How is it possible for humans to move in the multitude of ways that we do? Learn to develop your X-ray vision of human beings in motion through functional anatomical study that combines movement practice, drawing, lecture, and problem solving. In this course, movement is a powerful vehicle for experiencing in detail our profoundly adaptable musculoskeletal anatomy. Facilitating our study of the entire musculoskeletal system, we will learn Irene Dowd’s Spirals™, a comprehensive warm-up/cool-down for dancing that coordinates all joints and muscles through their fullest range of motion. In addition to movement practice, drawings will be part of each week’s lecture. (Drawing materials will be provided.) Insights and skills developed in this course can provide tremendous inspiration in the process of movement invention and composition.

Faculty

Anatomy Seminar

Component—Fall

This is an opportunity for advanced students who have completed Anatomy I to pursue their studies in greater depth. In open consultation with the instructor during class meetings, each student engages in independent research, developing one or more lines of inquiry that utilize functional anatomy perspectives and texts as an organizing framework. Research topics in recent years have included breathing, anatomy study in dance education, spine function, scoliosis, the use of verbal language in dance training, and anatomy of human reproductive and digestive systems. The class meets biweekly to discuss progress and questions, with additional meetings on alternate weeks as an option for individuals or the group.

Faculty

Teaching Conference

Component—Year

In this practice-based course, students develop skills to bring their artistry into a teaching setting. Readings, discussion, and short written pieces will support exploration of perspectives on teaching and development of individual areas of interest. Following current practices in the field for bringing together arts and education, we will study methods for artists to partner with educators and implement those methods in a weekly class for children enrolled in SLC’s acclaimed Early Childhood Center (ECC). In addition to our work with ECC, there are several options for those interested in an expanded practical curriculum. SLC’s Campbell Sports Center offers opportunities for students to initiate and lead physical education classes; and SLC’s Office of Community Partnerships can assist students in pursuing teaching initiatives in surrounding communities, including Yonkers, greater Westchester, and other New York City Metropolitan areas.

Faculty

Graduate Courses

Dance 2017-2018

Anatomy in Action

Component—Year

The course will be taught by Ms. Gould in the fall and Ms. Welsh in the spring. Students who wish to join this yearlong class in the second semester may do so only with the permission of the instructor.

How is it possible for humans to move in the multitude of ways that we do? Learn to develop your X-ray vision of human beings in motion through functional anatomical study that combines movement practice, drawing, lecture, and problem solving. In this course, movement is a powerful vehicle for experiencing in detail our profoundly adaptable musculoskeletal anatomy. Facilitating our study of the entire musculoskeletal system, we will learn Irene Dowd’s Spirals™, a comprehensive warm-up/cool-down for dancing that coordinates all joints and muscles through their fullest range of motion. In addition to movement practice, drawings will be part of each week’s lecture. (Drawing materials will be provided.) Insights and skills developed in this course can provide tremendous inspiration in the process of movement invention and composition.

Faculty

Anatomy Seminar

Component—Fall

This is an opportunity for advanced students who have completed Anatomy I to pursue their studies in greater depth. In open consultation with the instructor during class meetings, each student engages in independent research, developing one or more lines of inquiry that utilize functional anatomy perspectives and texts as an organizing framework. Research topics in recent years have included breathing, anatomy study in dance education, spine function, scoliosis, the use of verbal language in dance training, and anatomy of human reproductive and digestive systems. The class meets biweekly to discuss progress and questions, with additional meetings on alternate weeks as an option for individuals or the group.

Faculty

Conditioning for Dancers

Component—Year

Open to all students taking a Dance Third. The course will be taught by Ms. Gould in the fall and Ms. Hullihan in the spring.

This course provides students with a weekly opportunity to explore and practice supplemental training strategies to support development of specialized skills required in dancing. Building on work done once or twice per semester in the dance practice conferences, training issues such as strength, endurance, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness, and coordination will be addressed from a neuromuscular training approach based on the teachings and selected choreographies of Irene Dowd. In addition, students will be introduced to the Alexander Technique, which aims to refine and optimize function by eliminating excessive tension. This is accomplished through specific exercises and practices designed to increase awareness, implement conscious direction, and achieve gentle re-patterning of postural and movement habits.

Faculty

Teaching Conference

Component—Year

Students may enter this yearlong course in the second semester only with permission of the instructor. The course will be taught by Ms. Gould in the fall and Ms. Nugent in the spring.

In this practice-based course, students develop skills to bring their artistry into a teaching setting. Readings, discussion, and short written pieces will support exploration of perspectives on teaching and development of individual areas of interest. Following current practices in the field for bringing together arts and education, we will study methods for artists to partner with educators and implement those methods in a weekly class for children enrolled in SLC’s acclaimed Early Childhood Center (ECC). In addition to our work with ECC, there are several options for those interested in an expanded practical curriculum. SLC’s Campbell Sports Center offers opportunities for students to initiate and lead physical education classes; and SLC’s Office of Community Partnerships can assist students in pursuing teaching initiatives in surrounding communities, including Yonkers, greater Westchester, and other New York City Metropolitan areas.

Faculty

Previous Courses

Dance/Movement Fundamentals

Open , Component—Year

This class is open to all interested students; no prior experience in dance is required. Students who successfully complete this course will be prepared to enter Contemporary Practice and/or Ballet.

Movement and dancing are definitive signs of life! In every environment and at every level of existence, from single-cell organisms to entire populations, dancing is innate to living beings. The objective here is to awaken/reawaken students’ connection to movement as an elemental mode of human experience and learning. Students are introduced to some basic principles of dancing, as well as to strategies for preparing for dancing. Building fundamental skills for a wide range of movement studies, the focus is centered on learning movement and refining individual, partnered, and group performance in a variety of patterns and styles. Basic anatomical information is used to facilitate an understanding of dynamic alignment and movement potentials. Challenges in coordination, rhythm, range, and dynamic quality are systematically engaged, allowing students to gain strength, flexibility, endurance, balance, musicality, and awareness in the dance setting. While primary emphasis is placed on learning structured material, improvisation and composition are incorporated to support students’ growing engagement with dance as an art form.

Faculty

Dance Training Conference

Component—Year

Students taking Contemporary Practice I, II, and III will meet with the instructor for this component course at least once per semester to address individual dance training issues and questions and to identify short- and long-term goals. Guided by discussion, we will develop practical strategies to address issues and questions in the context of achieving goals by means of specific supplemental exercises that address strength, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness, coordination, and effective approaches to learning. This course is designed to support and enhance students’ work in dance classes, rehearsals, and performances.

Faculty

Graduate Seminar III

Graduate Seminar

What we do in our training is what we are training ourselves to do. The meaning and implications of this seemingly simple statement are simultaneously obvious and elusive. In developing our dance artistry, the ability to understand how we do what we do can be instrumental to expanding our potentials as performers, makers and spectators. Structured and improvisational exercises are utilized in this seminar to explore individuals’ extant technical strategies, identifying key aspects of technical lineage, and increasing awareness of individual preferences and aesthetic interests. This deconstructive process allows participants to systematically broaden their range of performative and choreographic possibilities. Additionally, we examine training strategies for preparing ourselves and our dancers to perform the choreographic material being developed for Dance Making projects, and work collectively to develop and lead pre-performance warm up sessions for department concerts each semester.

Faculty

First-Year Studies in Dance

Open , FYS

The dance program provides first-year students with an integrated and vital curriculum of formal movement practices, improvisation, dance history, bimonthly Dance Meetings and First-Year Studies seminar. First-Year Studies in Dance consists of a full Dance Third with 12 to 15 hours of in-class time, including a daily physical practice class at an appropriate level. In practice classes such as Contemporary, African Dance, and Ballet, emphasis is placed on developing awareness of space, time and rhythm, use of energy, articulation of form through sensation, and building strength and control with an understanding of functional anatomy and cultural/historical context. In Improvisation, structured activities form a framework for investigating the properties of movement in the context of experience and performance. Goals include honing perceptive and communicative skills, exploring movement instincts and appetites, and constructing a viable foundation from which to work creatively. In Dance History, students will explore the history of concert dance in the United States from the early 20th century to the present. Dance Meeting provides an additional curricular and community-building resource for all dance students through master classes with guest artists and other experts in fields related to dance and performance. In the First-Year Studies in Dance seminar, students work both independently and in groups toward expanding analytical and generative capabilities in performance, observation, reading, writing, and discussion. We will consider and cultivate critical perspectives on dance as an art form through movement studies, class exercises and discussions, text-based studies, and oral presentation, building skills in each of those areas throughout the year.

Faculty

Beginning Improvisation

Component—Year

Merge your imagination and movement potential through dance improvisation. This invaluable creative mode offers students the opportunity to recognize and develop sensations, ideas, and visions of dancing possibilities. Internal and external perceptions will be honed while looking at movement from many points of view—as an individual and in partnership with others. Beginning Improvisation is required for all students new to the dance program. This class is an entry into the creative trajectory that later leads to composition and dance making. Other improvisation classes are recommended for students who have already taken Beginning Improvisation and want to explore this form further.

Faculty

Anatomy Seminar - Graduate

Graduate Seminar—Year

This is an opportunity for advanced students who have completed Anatomy I to pursue their study of anatomy in greater depth. Each student will research a topic or topics in which functional anatomy plays a significant part. We will meet weekly to discuss questions and share experiences.

Faculty

Graduate Seminar I

Graduate Seminar—Spring

The Spring semester will focus on critical perspectives in dance, culture and identity. When we look at dancing, what are we seeing, experiencing and understanding? How do current representations of dance perpetuate or disrupt assumptions about personal and social identity? Embedded notions of gender, economic class and race are threaded through our daily lives. Art and popular culture sometimes reinforce dominant cultural ideas, but can they also serve to propose alternatives to those ideas? In this seminar, we will examine a range of dancing on film, web-based media, television programs and commercials. These viewings, along with selected texts from the fields of dance and performance, literary criticism, feminist theory, queer theory and cultural studies, will form the basis of class discussions, exercises, readings, research and writing. The ultimate aim of this course is to cultivate a richly informed conversation among engaged participants, using academic work and life experience to illuminate and advance our appreciation of dance as an elemental art form.

Faculty