Mali Yin

BS, Shaanxi Normal University, China. PhD, Temple University. Postdoctoral research associate, Michigan State University. Researcher and author of articles in areas of inorganic, organic, and protein chemistry; special interests in synthesis and structure determination of inorganic and organometallic compounds by X-ray diffraction and various spectroscopic techniques, protein crystallography, environmental chemistry, and material science. SLC, 1996–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Chemistry

Organic Chemistry II

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I.

In this course, we will explore the physical and chemical properties of additional families of organic molecules. The reactivity of aromatic compounds, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives (acid chlorides, acid anhydrides, esters, and amides), enols and enolates, and amines will be discussed. We will also investigate the methods by which large, complicated molecules can be synthesized from simple starting materials. Modern methods of organic structural determination—such as mass spectrometry, 1 H and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy—will also be introduced. In the laboratory section of this course, we will continue to develop the techniques and skills required to synthesize, separate, purify, and identify organic compounds. Organic Chemistry II is a key requirement for pre-med students and is strongly encouraged for all others who are interested in the biological and physical sciences.

Faculty

Biochemistry

Advanced , Seminar—Spring

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry and General Biology.

Biochemistry is the chemistry of biological systems. This course will introduce students to the basic principles and concepts of biochemistry. Topics will include the structure and function of biomolecules such as amino acids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, RNA, DNA, and bioenergetics. This knowledge will then be used to study the pathways of metabolism.

Faculty

Organic Chemistry I

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

Prerequisite: General Chemistry or its equivalent.

This course is a systematic study of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Introductory topics include bonding, structure, properties, reactions, nomenclature, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, and synthesis of organic compounds from a functional group approach. More advanced topics include reaction mechanisms, chemistry of aromatic compounds, carbonyl compounds, and biomolecules such as carbohydrates and amino acids. In the laboratory, students learn the basic techniques used in the synthesis, isolation, and identification of organic compounds.

Faculty

Environmental Chemistry

Open , Seminar—Fall

This course provides an introduction to basic concepts of chemistry and their application to current environmental issues. Topics include acid rain, ozone depletion, air pollution, global warming, and surface water and groundwater pollution. We will then consider how human activities—such as transportation, energy production, and chemical industries—influence the environment.

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Previous Courses

General Chemistry II

Open , Lecture—Spring

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. We will begin with a detailed study of both the physical and the chemical properties of solutions. This will enable us to consider the factors that affect both the rates and the direction of chemical reactions. We will then investigate the properties of acids and bases and the role that electricity plays in chemistry. The course will conclude with introductions to nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. Weekly laboratory sessions will allow us to demonstrate and test the theories described in the lecture segment of the course.

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General Chemistry I

Open , Lecture—Fall

Chemistry is the study of the properties, composition, and transformation of matter. Chemistry is central to the production of materials required for modern life; for example, the synthesis of pharmaceuticals to treat disease, the manufacture of fertilizers and pesticides required to feed an ever-growing population, and the development of efficient and environmentally benign energy sources. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of modern chemistry. We will begin by examining the structure and properties of atoms, which are the building blocks of the elements and the simplest substances in the material world around us. We will then explore how atoms of different elements can bond with each other to form an infinite variety of more complex substances called compounds. This will lead us to an investigation of several classes of chemical reactions and the processes by which substances are transformed into new materials with different physical properties. Along the way, we will learn how and why the three states of matter (solids, liquids, and gases) differ from one another and how energy may be either produced or consumed by chemical reactions. In weekly laboratory sessions, we will perform experiments to illustrate and test the theories presented in the lecture part of the course. These experiments will also serve to develop practical skills in both synthetic and analytic chemical techniques.

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First-Year Studies: The Extraordinary Chemistry of Everyday Life

Open , FYS—Year

Everything that we eat, wear, and do involves chemistry. This yearlong course examines the chemistry of our everyday life—the way things work. The emphasis of this course is on understanding everyday use of chemistry. We will introduce chemistry concepts with everyday examples, such as household chemicals and gasoline, that show how we already use chemistry and reveal why chemistry is important to us. We will concentrate on topics of current interest, such as environmental pollution, and the substances that we use in our daily lives that affect our environment and ourselves. We will emphasize practical applications of chemistry to issues involving food and nutrition.

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Biochemistry

Advanced , Seminar—Spring

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry and General Biology.

Biochemistry is the chemistry of biological systems. This course will introduce students to the basic principles and concepts of biochemistry. Topics will include the structure and function of biomolecules such as amino acids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, RNA, DNA, and bioenergetics. This knowledge will then be used to study the pathways of metabolism.

Faculty

Organic Chemistry

Intermediate , Seminar—Year

Prerequisite: General Chemistry or its equivalent. This yearlong course will be taught by Mr. Balasubramaniam in the fall and Ms. Yin in the spring.

This course is a systematic study of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Introductory topics include bonding, structure, properties, reactions, nomenclature, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, and synthesis of organic compounds from a functional group approach. More advanced topics include reaction mechanisms, chemistry of aromatic compounds, carbonyl compounds, and biomolecules such as carbohydrates and amino acids. In the laboratory, students will learn the basic techniques used in the synthesis, isolation, and identification of organic compounds.

Faculty

Environmental Chemistry

Open , Seminar—Fall

This course provides an introduction to basic concepts of chemistry and their application to current environmental issues. Topics include acid rain, ozone depletion, air pollution, global warming, and surface water and groundwater pollution. We will then consider how human activities such as transportation, energy production, and chemical industries influence the environment.

Faculty
Related Disciplines