Study Abroad in Italy

Contact

E-mail

914.395.2305

Italy

Sarah Lawrence students interested in studying abroad in Italy are invited to consider the following study abroad options in Italy. These study abroad opportunities are open to Sarah Lawrence College students only.

Middlebury in Florence

The Middlebury program is open to Sarah Lawrence students with or without a background in Italian.

Middlebury’s Sede at the Palazzo Giugni is situated in the academic heart of the old city, an area bustling with coffee shops, bookstores, cultural clubs, and academic buildings. The Duomo, Ponte Vecchio, and Florence’s other main monuments are all within easy walking distance. The Florence program is affiliated with the University of Florence.

Apply now

Academics

Students at all levels of linguistic ability are able to enroll at School in Italy's Florence site through one of three tracks: Beginner, Intermediate, or Advanced. Courses in the visual arts are also available. Students will take language and area studies courses at the Middlebury Sede. Elective courses may be taken at the University of Florence and select art studios in Florence.

Beginner Track

The beginner track offers a unique opportunity to students who are new to the Italian language to approach its study in a more immersive context. The Language and Culture course will be taught in Italian so as to allow students not only to study the language, but to offer them an opportunity to use it in an environment that focuses on its acquisition. Area Studies courses will begin in English and increase toward more content in Italian as the semester progresses. Students will also be able to take advantage of the Middlebury Language Pledge® to help jump-start their Italian language proficiency. In consultation with the director of the program, students may also be given the option of choosing from courses taught in English at the Università degli Studi di Firenze or courses in studio art taught at the Accademia d'Arte Firenze.

The beginner track is designed for students with less than one year of college-level Italian (or the equivalent).

Intermediate Track

The intermediate track allows students to learn Italian by taking language and area studies courses at the Middlebury Sede. The language of instruction will be in Italian and, along with a Language and Culture course, students will take courses in area studies allowing them to gain a wider breadth of knowledge in disciplines such as Italian history, literature, and art. The Middlebury Language Pledge® will be an integral part of the learning process, an invaluable tool that will help students strengthen their linguistic ability. In consultation with the director, students may have the option of substituting one of their Sede courses for a course at the Università degli Studi di Firenze or the Accademia di Belle Arti di Firenze.

The intermediate track is designed for students who have completed between one and one and a half years of college-level Italian (or the equivalent).

Advanced Track

The advanced track is designed for students with strong abilities in written and spoken Italian. This track emphasizes acquisition of language skills and intellectual development through a curriculum of content-driven language and cultural study exclusively in Italian. We strongly urge all students to enroll in the program for the full academic year: compared to a shorter stay, the linguistic, academic, and personal benefits of a ten-month stay are incalculable.

For this track, students enroll in one course at the Middlebury Sede and take their remaining credits at the Università degli Studi di Firenze or the Accademia di Belle Arti di Firenze. By directly enrolling at the local university, you have the unique opportunity to maximize intellectual and linguistic growth in a truly authentic Italian environment.

The director will guide you toward courses most appropriate to your intellectual, linguistic, and curricular interests. An academic internship may take the place of one university course.

The advanced track is designed for students with two or more years of college-level Italian (or the equivalent).

Beginner Track Courses

Please note that the courses offered at the Middlebury Sede may occasionally vary from semester to semester. Additionally, the beginner track's Language & Culture course is taught in Italian and instruction in the beginner track's content courses is given in English at the beginning of the semester and gradually progresses to instruction in Italian throughout the semester.

Language & Culture—Italian Language Course (fall and spring)

The more we are able to speak a language the more we are able to not only communicate but to understand the culture that surrounds it. This beginner course is designed for students who are approaching the study of the Italian language for the first time. Studying in country means that as students acquire the language they will be able to immediately apply it and acquire a more in depth knowledge of Italian culture and society . Through the use of authentic and varied materials students will acquire the lexical, phonological and syntactical competences needed to communicate in language, as well as increase cross-cultural and intercultural competency.

During the course, therefore, much importance is given to developing the students' ability to communicate in Italian. We will begin with simpler situations gradually arriving at more complex structures. The approach to grammar is functional to the context so that grammar becomes a tool for communication. For this reason, active participation in the classroom is very important both in individual and group work. The objective of the teaching method is to try to highlight the resources and capabilities of each student paying attention to the learning style of each one, because the teacher is not only the person that gives information and corrects errors, but he/she is also a guide to discovering the new language, that must be felt as an encouraging challenge.

Content Course—Contemporary Italian Society (fall)

This course investigates the Italian culture by exploring the most salient aspects of the country from different perspectives. We will start with a historical overview that helps make the intricate dynamics of the present more intelligible. Within a detailed examination of both domestic and foreign politics, significant attention will also paid to the country as a member state of the European Union. Topics to be addressed include economic realities such as the North-South divide and the current Youth unemployment crisis. The course will examine the student protest movement of the 1960s, known as the "Sessantotto", and the social explosions it provoked. We will move on to look at the Catholic Church and its influence on social behaviors as well as the current debate regarding bioethical issues and civil rights. Particular focus will be placed on the social changes that have affected the institution of the Family, the struggles of women for equal rights as well as their role in the society and gender relations. The course will also highlight the political, social and economic implications of organized crime on Italian society. Lastly, we will look at Italy’s transformation from a nation of emigrants to one of immigration and the key-role it plays in the ongoing Migrant emergency.
The multidisciplinary approach to the study of Italy provides students with the tools needed to acquire a broad understanding of the cultural environment around them and thus to be deeply aware of the country's identity and complexity. Students are invited to reflect critically on how Italy’s culture has changed over time, to consider how far similar processes are at work in their own nation and to compare their own culture with the Italian one.

Content Course—History of Renaissance Art (fall)

This course will study the Italian Renaissance through the investigation of its architecture, sculpture and paintings between the 14th and 16th centuries. The opportunity to explore these works becomes a more exciting prospect when we consider that students will have the opportunity to visit the churches and museums that house the works and view everything first-hand. The first objective of the course will be dedicated to acquiring the skills to recognize the more prominent works that are present in the grand Florentine collections. The art will be analyzed and discussed not only on the basis of technique and style but also in relation to the social, religious, historical and political context that produced them. For this reason, the second objective of the course is to learn how to read in these masterpieces of the Renaissance the connection between the subject, the intention of the artist and the needs of those who commissioned these works.

Content Course—Cinema: A Lens to Culture and Society (spring)

The course aims at exploring Italian literature and culture through the cinematic tale. Thanks to the full vision of a number of films, from the masterpieces of the history of cinema up to contemporary works, and the reading of well-known poems and novels, students will get the chance to embark on an itinerary that, through the mirrors of film and literature, will drive them along the course of Italian culture and history in time, up to today.

The final section of the course will focus on Florence: we will re-live the history as well as the artistic, literary and cultural tradition of the city via the literary works and the films that chose Florence as a set. The course will include lectures (screenings, analysis and discussion of the films and the literary works) and field trips to the places film and literature identified as the most representative of Florentine history and culture.

Authors and films we will study include: Giovanni Boccaccio/Taviani brothers, Giacomo Leopardi/Mario Martone, Giovanni Verga/Luchino Visconti, Eduardo De Filippo/Vittorio De Sica, Niccolò Ammaniti/Gabriele Salvatores, Dario Argento, Matteo Garrone.

Content Course—Philosophies of Art and Beauty from Plato to Michelangelo (spring)

A good portion of what we consider the “artistic legacy of the West” is strongly tied to the city of Florence. It is visible in its monuments, museums and piazzas. There is also a less tangible heredity that belongs to the philosophers and intellectuals (poets, writers), whose names are revered beyond the city walls: starting from Dante and Petrarch and arriving at Leonardo and Michelangelo. We will use the city of Florence and its cultural legacy to investigate the history of Western Aesthetic thought delving into central questions of aesthetics such as the nature of aesthetic judgment, the perception of aesthetic objects, and the nature of art objects. The course surveys the approaches to these themes starting from the classics of Western philosophy with Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus. The following step is to both examine the theories of beauty and art from the point of view of religious theologians such as Augustine of Hippo (St. Augustine), and to analyze the topic from a medieval perspective (both Christian and lay) including that of the great Italian poets Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio.

We will then arrive at the period known as the Renaissance, deepening our interdisciplinary investigation of literature and the visual arts. It is, in fact, during the 15th and 16th centuries that the concept of artistic expresion as we know it today was conceived as an individual achievement: a result of creative excellence in the world, music or sculpture that embodies the essence of "beauty" for an entire culture, such as what occurred with the works of Brunelleschi, Donatello, Alberti, Leonardo, and Michelangelo. We will conclude our journey into the concept of Aesthetics and beauty by asking ourselves: what is considered “beautiful” today and which artists represent this beauty?

Intermediate Track Courses

Please note that the courses offered at the Middlebury Sede may occasionally vary from semester to semester.

La storia culturale del cibo: Rappresentazioni nell'arte e nella letteratura (fall)

Il corso si propone di offrire agli studenti le indicazioni metodologiche necessarie per indagare la storia culturale del cibo e il significato del cibo per la definizione dell'identità culturale di qualunque paese o comunità sociale. L'analisi si svolgerà attraverso una rassegna di documenti letterari e d'arte figurativa organizzata in senso cronologico e suddivisa per ambiti culturali, partendo dallo studio delle evidenze archeologiche per giungere alla contemporanea fotografia d'autore.

L'Europa per la sua ricchezza alimentare e tradizione gastronomica radicata nella storia rappresenta un osservatorio ideale per lo studio dell'evoluzione del cibo nelle sue forme e nel suo simbolismo. Pertanto la pittura e la letteratura saranno i serbatoi cui attingere per rintracciare i documenti necessari allo svolgimento dell'indagine senza trascurare tuttavia le preziose indicazioni fornite dall'arte europea.

La società italiana contemporánea (spring)

Il corso presenta la società italiana a partire dagli aspetti più interessanti del paese e da differenti prospettive. Inizieremo con una introduzione storica che renderà più facile la comprensione del presente. Gli argomenti comprenderanno poi le realtà socio-economiche come: la questione meridionale e l'emigrazione. A essa seguirà l'analisi della cultura politica dell'Italia e il suo essere un membro dell'Unione Europea. Verranno analizzate le caratteristiche comuni e le differenze tra la rivoluzione culturale degli anni sessanta del XX secolo sia in Italia che negli Stati Uniti. Inoltre studieremo la Chiesa cattolica e i cambiamenti sociali che hanno interessato: la famiglia, le donne e le relazioni fra generi. Infine prenderemo in esame: il crimine organizzato, l'immigrazione e l'integrazione culturale.

L'approccio multidisciplinare del corso renderà gli studenti profondamente consapevoli dell'identità dell'Italia e li inviterà a: riflettere criticamente su come la società sia cambiata nel corso del tempo e a confrontare la propria cultura con quella italiana.

Viaggio in Italia fra lingua e cultura, passato e presente (spring)

Lingua o cultura? Tra gli obiettivi del corso è quello di sostenere fermamente che entrambi i poli di questa domanda si compenetrino e si rispondano vicendevolmente in ogni produzione testuale coerente e coesa, come emerge al minimo vaglio di una qualsiasi lettura autentica, sia essa narrativa o giornalistica, o di un ascolto, sia pure esso una canzone o una conversazione radiofonica, vale a dire quanto di più lontano si possa pensare da un oggetto “culturale”.

L’altro convincimento fortemente radicato nella struttura del corso è che la comprensione dei fenomeni dell’attualità non possa prescindere da una contestualizzazione della situazione che li hanno direttamente generati e nella più estesa dimensione storica che ne fa da cornice.

L’obiettivo principale di questo corso è di offrire agli studenti un’immagine il più possibile realistica e attuale di alcuni aspetti della società italiana, attraverso le loro manifestazioni linguistiche e, appunto, culturali, in modo da sviluppare negli apprendenti uno sguardo critico e obiettivo sulla nostra civiltà. Gli incontri con i protagonisti di questo viaggio nel paesaggio culturale italiano dovrebbero suscitare negli studenti un confronto fra gli stimoli del presente e le suggestioni del passato.

Advanced Track Courses

Please note that the courses offered at the Middlebury Sede may occasionally vary from semester to semester.

La storia culturale del cibo: Rappresentazioni nell'arte e nella letteratura (fall)

Il corso si propone di offrire agli studenti le indicazioni metodologiche necessarie per indagare la storia culturale del cibo e il significato del cibo per la definizione dell'identità culturale di qualunque paese o comunità sociale. L'analisi si svolgerà attraverso una rassegna di documenti letterari e d'arte figurativa organizzata in senso cronologico e suddivisa per ambiti culturali, partendo dallo studio delle evidenze archeologiche per giungere alla contemporanea fotografia d'autore.

L'Europa per la sua ricchezza alimentare e tradizione gastronomica radicata nella storia rappresenta un osservatorio ideale per lo studio dell'evoluzione del cibo nelle sue forme e nel suo simbolismo. Pertanto la pittura e la letteratura saranno i serbatoi cui attingere per rintracciare i documenti necessari allo svolgimento dell'indagine senza trascurare tuttavia le preziose indicazioni fornite dall'arte europea.

L'altra Italia: Voci migranti (spring)

Il corso si propone di offrire agli studenti un quadro generale sulla letteratura e cultura della migrazione in Italia. Storicamente terra di partenza di molti italiani verso le Americhe e l’Europa, l’Italia negli ultimi trenta anni è diventata terra di arrivo di migranti da numerose parti del mondo. Attratti dalle possibilità economiche e culturali offerte dall’Unione Europea, o spinti da dispotismi, guerre civili e carestie, numerosi migranti si mettono in cammino verso l’Europa, alla ricerca di un futuro migliore. L’Italia, per la sua posizione geografica, e per il suo valore culturale e linguistico, ha un ruolo centrale nel nuovo panorama socio-economico e politico dell’Europa. Per questo molti migranti la scelgono come terra di destinazione, mentre altri vi si trovano bloccati da impedimenti legali nel loro passaggio verse altre destinazioni. Lo studio della produzione culturale dei migranti in Italia è quindi un occasione per mappare un momento storico particolare, e per scoprire un’immagine più complessa e articolata dell’Italia di quella notoriamente conosciuta e esportata. Attraverso l’analisi di testi letterari, film, documentari, pittura, istallazioni e notiziari prodotti dai migranti e sui migranti, gli studenti rifletteranno su temi centrali all’esperienza della migrazione in Italia, quali la migrazione interna, il confine mediterraneo, la lingua, la discriminazione e l’accoglienza, il cibo, il multiculturalismo, e le seconde generazioni.

Le poetiche del '900 attraverso i caffè letterari fiorentini: Un percorso dal Futurismo alla Neoavanguardia (spring)

Il corso affronterà alcuni momenti fondamentali della storia letteraria del secondo Novecento italiano, a partire dai gruppi di scrittori che utilizzarono il caffè letterario come luogo di incontro intellettuale, con particolare riferimento al contesto della città di Firenze. In questo modo si potranno prendere in esame i mutamenti di ordine estetico, teoretico e politico in un periodo compreso tra il 1909 e il 1963. Saranno analizzate le poetiche di alcuni movimenti letterari particolarmente rilevanti quali il Futurismo, l’Ermetismo, Il Neorealismo e la Poesia Visiva. Tutti questi movimenti, infatti, sono nati o si sono sviluppati tra i tavoli dei principali caffè letterari fiorentini. Prendendo in esame le opere di alcuni scrittori tra cui Giovanni Papini, Ardengo Soffici, Eugenio Montale, Mario Luzi, Aldo Palazzeschi e Vasco Pratolini, si procederà alla lettura di alcuni testi teorici (Manifesti), poetici (poesie di Marinetti, Folgore, Palazzeschi, Montale, Luzi), narrativi (Se questo è un uomo di Primo Levi, Il sentiero dei nidi di ragno di Italo Calvino) e filmici (Vita futurista, Cronache di poveri amanti, Paisà). Il corso prevede, inoltre, una dettagliata lettura dei romanzi Il codice di Perelà di Aldo Palazzeschi e Il quartiere di Vasco Pratolini. Ad una parte di natura storico-culturale, con l’attenzione rivolta allo spazio culturale rappresentato dai caffè letterari, si affiancherà una parte ermeneutico-letteraria, e, di ciascun movimento preso in considerazione verranno fornite molteplici esemplificazioni di poetica, cercando di includere differenti modalità espressive e artistiche come pittura e musica. Il corso sarà completato, infine, da tre visite guidate nella città di Firenze alla scoperta dei caffè letterari scomparsi e di quelli ancora esistenti, oltre che del museo del Novecento.

Il viaggio nella letteratura, il cinema, e nella música (spring)

Il viaggio rappresenta da sempre un’attività umana peculiare, sia quando si tratti della ricerca dell’ignoto sia quando costituisca una necessità per la sopravvivenza, ma ancor più il viaggio ritrae la metafora della vita, tema che ha affascinato gli artisti di tutte le epoche dalla composizione dei poemi omerici al cinema contemporaneo. Quando si parla del viaggio, è necessario porsi delle domande che vanno oltre il “dove?” chiedendosi anche “come?” e “perché?”. In questo corso tratteremo il tema del viaggio attraversando a tappe, lo svolgimento della letteratura italiana attorno a queste questioni. Affronteremo le nozioni e concetti dietro il leitmotiv del “viaggio” applicandoli ai vari testi. Analizzeremo le sovrastrutture tematiche per approfondire in maniera critica le individuali letture che prenderemo in esame.

Oltre ad un’analisi critica e analitica dei testi, il corso ha come obiettivo l’acquisizione da parte degli studenti delle competenze linguistiche e grammaticali. Sapersi esprimere in una lingua vuol dire essere in grado di riprodurre forme grammaticali corrette, possedere un lessico ricco e essere a conoscenza degli aspetti socio-culturali che condizionano la comunicazione e la possibilità di interagire efficacemente nei contesti comunicativi della nuova cultura.

L’obiettivo sarà lo sviluppo armonico delle diverse abilità linguistiche con attività di ascolto, lettura e produzione orale in gruppo e individuale, di cui sarà parte integrante anche la ripresa e/o la presentazione delle strutture complesse della lingua.

Living in Florence

Sarah Lawrence requires all students to live with host families in Florence. Middlebury College will provide students with different options upon confirmation of attendance.

Admission

This program is open to juniors and seniors in good standing.

Applications & Deadlines

Students may apply for the fall, full year, or spring semester. The completed application is due February 1 for fall/full year and October 15 for spring.

Apply now

Tuition & Fees

Listed below is an estimate of costs to help you plan for the semester ahead. Sarah Lawrence tuition, per semester, will be $26,300.

Students are required to live in a homestay. The Middlebury office in Florence will provide a list of homestays to choose from upon acceptance. Students will have breakfast and dinner at their homestay six days a week. Price will vary according to the selection.

Estimated Living Expenses
Fall: September - December* Fall: September - January Spring Year
Room/board $4,050 $5,060 $5,060 $10,120
Books/supples $140 $165 $165 $345
Personal $820 $930 $930 $1,785
Travel from New York $1000 $1000 $1000 $1000
Visa/residency permit $255 $255 $255 $255
Total $6,265 $7,410 $7,410 $13,505

*Students enrolled in courses at the Sede ONLY (e.g. beginner track students) will finish their semester at the end of December. Students enrolled in courses at the Accademia di Belle Arti or the Università di Firenze should expect their semester to end in January.

Financial Aid

Sarah Lawrence College students who normally receive financial aid will be able to apply all their financial aid towards the cost of this program.

Pitzer in Parma

Sarah Lawrence students are strongly recommended to have completed prior study in Italian language and/or coursework in European or Italian history.

Pitzer has selected the city of Parma in Emilia-Romagna to provide students with a high degree of integration into Italian family life and community. The Parma program is affiliated with the University of Parma.

Academic Program

All students enroll in the following courses:

  • Studies in Italian Culture
  • Intensive Italian Language
  • Survey of Italian Renaissance Art
  • Community-Based Service Learning

Living in Parma

All students are required to live with host families in Parma.