Nicolaus Mills

BA, Harvard University. PhD, Brown University. Special interest in American studies. Author of Every Army Man is With You: The Cadets Who Won the 1964 Army-Navy Gamr, Fought in Vietnam, and Came Home Forever ChangedWinning the Peace: The Marshall Plan and America’s Coming of Age as a Superpower; The Triumph of Meanness: America’s War Against Its Better Self; Their Last Battle: The Fight for the National World War II Memorial; Like a Holy Crusade: Mississippi 1964; The Crowd in American Literature; and American and English Fiction in the 19th Century. Editor of Getting Out: Historical Perspectives on Leaving Iraq; Debating Affirmative Action; Arguing Immigration; Culture in an Age of Money; Busing USA; The New Journalism; and The New Killing Fields. Contributor to The New Republic, The Daily Beast, The Boston Globe, The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, Newsday, The Nation, Yale Review, National Law Journal, and The Guardian; editorial board member, Dissent magazine. Recipient of fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, and the Rockefeller Foundation. SLC, 1972–

Undergraduate Courses 2021-2022

Literature

Nature’s Nation: Landscape and Literature in America

Open, Seminar—Year

From the start, the presence of vast areas of wilderness has been a characteristic of America and a source of fascination for our writers. They, like America’s painters, have been influenced by the scenery around them and have approached it in a variety of ways. For much of our history, we were nature’s nation. This course will focus on the changing meaning of landscape for our writers and trace how their interest in landscape evolved into an interest in cityscape. For Henry David Thoreau at Walden Pond, nature was a means of renewal. For Frederick Douglass, the land was a source of his entrapment as a slave. For Mark Twain’s Huck Finn, life on a raft in the middle of the Mississippi meant refuge. This course will begin in the 19th century and continue into the 20th century with books such as Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth, John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, and James Baldwin’s Notes of a Native Son.

Faculty

The Marriage Plot: Love and Romance in American and English Fiction

Sophomore and Above, Seminar—Year

“Reader, I married him. A quiet wedding we had,” Charlotte Brontë’s title character exclaims in the concluding chapter of Jane Eyre. Jane’s wedding may be quiet, but the steps leading up to her marriage with a man who once employed her as a governess are tumultuous. With the publication of Jane Eyre, we have left behind the early marriage-plot novel in which a series of comic misunderstandings pave the way for a joyous wedding. This course will begin with such classic marriage-plot novels as Jane Austen’s Emma, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Henry James’s Portrait of a Lady, and Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth. But the course will also look at love and courtship in untraditional marriage-plot novels such as Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God. By the time the course concludes with Jeffrey Eugenides’s contemporary novel, The Marriage Plot, the marriages and courtships we see will be distinctly modern in the form that they take and, equally significant, in the complexity and uncertainty that they bring with them. 

Faculty

Previous Courses

Literature

First-Person America

Open, Seminar—Year

To a remarkable degree, the most important American literature texts, whether fiction or nonfiction, are written from a first-person perspective and depend on a unique “I” speaking directly to readers and focusing on a wide variety of personal experiences. In the 19th century, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, and Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn are all first-person narratives. In the early 20th century, the same first-person strategy holds for Willa Cather’s My Antonia, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms. This course will begin by surveying the classic, first-person texts of American literature and then move on to such modern work as Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar, James Baldwin’s Notes of a Native Son, and Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior. At the heart of this course is the premise that contemporary, American first-person writing is an extension, not a departure, from classic American first-person writing.

Faculty

First-Year Studies: The Marriage Plot: Love and Romance in American and English Fiction

Open, FYS—Year

“Reader, I married him. A quiet wedding we had,” Charlotte Bronte’s title character exclaims in the concluding chapter of Jane Eyre. Jane’s wedding may be quiet, but the steps leading up to her marriage with the man who once employed her as a governess are tumultuous. With the publication of Jane Eyre, we left behind the early marriage-plot novel in which a series of comic misunderstandings pave the way for a joyous wedding. From that point on, marriage would be a high-risk adventure for both parties. This course will begin with classic marriage-plot novels such as Jane Austen’s Emma, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Henry James’s Portrait of a Lady, and Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth. But the course will also look at love and courtship in such untraditional marriage-plot novels as Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God. By the time the course concludes with Jeffrey Eugenides’s The Marriage Plot and Tayari Jones’s An American Marriage, the marriages and courtships that we see will be distinctly modern in the form that they take and in the complexity and divorces that they bring with them.

Faculty

The Literature of Fact: Journalism and Beyond

Open, Seminar—Year

The last 60 years have been boom times for nonfiction writing. From investigative reporting to memoirs, the literature of fact has thrived. Writers have found that, as the late Tom Wolfe observed, it is possible to turn out nonfiction as lively as fiction and, in the process, capture the history of one’s own times. The aim of this course is to explore nonfiction in a variety of forms and for students to write nonfiction of their own. The course will focus on basic reporting, memoirs, op-eds, reviews, profiles, and long-form journalism. Students will do writing of their own that matches the kind of writing being studied at the time. The course will begin by emphasizing writing technique and move on to longer assignments in which research, interviews, and legwork play an increasingly important role. The writers studied will range from James Baldwin and George Orwell to Joan Didion and Gay Talese. This course is not for students with remedial writing problems or with difficulty meeting deadlines. At the time of their interviews, students must bring with them short samples of their written work.

Faculty

The Marriage Plot: Love and Romance in Classic American and English Fiction

Sophomore and Above, Seminar—Fall

“Reader, I married him. A quiet wedding we had,” Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre exclaims in the concluding chapter of Jane Eyre. Jane’s wedding may be quiet, but the steps leading up to her marriage with the man who once employed her as a governess are the opposite of quiet. By the time of Jane Eyre, we are far from the early marriage-plot novel in which suitors, proposals, and comic misunderstandings pave the way for a joyous wedding. This course is designed to follow the evolution of the marriage plot in classic 19th- and 20th-century American and English fiction. The course begins with Jane Austen’s Emma and ends with Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar. In between, we will read six paired novels: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter and George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre and Henry James’s The Portrait of a Lady, and Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth and D. H. Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers.

Faculty

Writing

First-Year Studies: Writing the Literature of Fact

Open, FYS—Year

The aim of this course is to have students produce a range of nonfiction essays. We start with basic reporting and work our way up to long-form journalism. Along the way, we will read a series of well-known nonfiction writers—among them George Orwell, Joan Didion, and James Baldwin. But the reading that we will do is designed to serve the writing. This is not a course in the history of the nonfiction essay. Essays are assigned with deadlines for drafts, rewrites, and final copies. The assignments are those that any editor would give. The aim of this course, to paraphrase Tom Wolfe, is to produce nonfiction as lively as fiction. Accurate reporting is a non-negotiable starting and finishing point. The course will begin by emphasizing writing technique; and as we move to longer assignments, our focus will be on the role that research, interviews, and legwork play in completing a story. This course is not for first-year students with remedial writing problems or for those whose preference is fiction writing.

Faculty