Violet Kupersmith

BA, Mount Holyoke College. Author of the short-story collection The Frangipani Hotel and the novel Build Your House Around My Body, a finalist for the Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize. Her writing has appeared in Fairy Tale Review and The Massachusetts Review, and she has received fellowships from the Fulbright Program and the University of East Anglia. SLC, 2022–

Graduate Courses 2021-2022

MFA Writing

We Are the Weirdos, Mister—Speculative Fiction Workshop

Workshop—Spring

We can approach the speculative as a mirror that sometimes allows us to view what we are unable to see directly and sometimes warps reality’s reflection into something that is perhaps less comfortable to look at but more honest. Or we can approach the speculative as a prism, refracting reality into something more beautiful. Together, we’ll explore our own reasons for seeking to subvert, push, or transgress the boundaries of the “real” in our fiction; and in our workshops and one-on-one conferences, we will experiment with voice, style, nontraditional storytelling, and aim to gird the architecture of your world-building. We will be doing magic, and we will be transforming. We’ll read from a range of authors—possibly including but not limited to Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Angela Carter, Mariana Enriquez, N. K. Jemisin, Alice Sola Kim, Vernon Lee, Ken Liu, Brenda Peynado, and Karen Tei Yamashita—and consider the ways in which speculative fiction enables minority writers, in particular, to escape the standard tropes of “ethnic fiction” and to reimagine issues such as identity, immigration, and otherness.

Faculty

Previous Courses

MFA Writing

We Are the Weirdos, Mister—Speculative Fiction Workshop

Workshop—Spring

We can approach the speculative as a mirror that sometimes allows us to view what we are unable to see directly and sometimes warps reality’s reflection into something that is perhaps less comfortable to look at but more honest. Or we can approach the speculative as a prism, refracting reality into something more beautiful. Together, we’ll explore our own reasons for seeking to subvert, push, or transgress the boundaries of the “real” in our fiction; and in our workshops and one-on-one conferences, we will experiment with voice, style, nontraditional storytelling, and aim to gird the architecture of your world-building. We will be doing magic, and we will be transforming. We’ll read from a range of authors—possibly including but not limited to Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Angela Carter, Mariana Enriquez, N. K. Jemisin, Alice Sola Kim, Vernon Lee, Ken Liu, Brenda Peynado, and Karen Tei Yamashita—and consider the ways in which speculative fiction enables minority writers, in particular, to escape the standard tropes of “ethnic fiction” and to reimagine issues such as identity, immigration, and otherness.

Faculty