Vera Iliatova

BA, Brandeis University. MFA, Yale University. Represented by Monya Rowe Gallery in New York City, venue of her fifth solo exhibition in 2015. Work included in numerous exhibitions in the United States and abroad at venues that include: Galleria Glance, Torino, Italy; Mogadishni Gallery, Copenhagen; New Langton Art Center, San Francisco; Artist Space, New York; and David Castillo Gallery, Miami. Previously held full-time teaching appointments at Massachusetts College of Art, University of California–Davis, and University of New Hampshire. Recipient of residencies at Skowhegan School of Art and Vermont Studio Center; awarded free studio space in The Space Program at the Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation, 2007/2008. SLC, 2014–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Visual and Studio Arts

Painterly Print

Open , Seminar—Fall and Spring

This course is an opening foray into the possibilities of painterly printmaking and experimental processes that merge printmaking with painting and drawing. The course will also cover fundamentals such as basic drawing and color mixing. As means to explore their individual idea, students will investigate a wide range of possibilities offered by monoprint techniques and will experiment with inks and paints, stencils, multiple plates, and images altered in sequence. Students will begin to develop a method to investigate meaning, or content, through the techniques of painterly printmaking. There will be an examination of various strategies that fluctuate between specific in-class assignments and individual studio work. In-class assignments will be supplemented with PowerPoint presentations, reading materials, film clips and video screenings, group critiques, homework projects, and visits to artist studios.

Faculty

Beginning Painting: From Observation to Invention

Open , Seminar—Fall

This course is an introduction to the materials and techniques of oil painting. There will be an examination of various painting strategies that fluctuate between specific in-class assignments and individual conference projects. The primary focus will be an elaboration on rudimentary concepts such as color, tonal structure, spatial construction, painting surfaces, and composition. The fall semester focuses on the subjects of still life and landscape, which will be starting points for experimentation with spatial structures ranging from direct observation to composite constructions. We will also explore narrative possibilities that landscape and still-life paintings can imply; and we will examine the role of these subjects in the history of painting and other visual media. The course will culminate in an individual project that will be researched by the student and discussed during conferences and course critiques and will include a large-scale painting. In-class assignments will be supplemented with PowerPoint presentations, reading material, film clips and video screenings, group critiques, and homework projects. Students are required to work in the studio outside the class time in order to develop the work. The goal of the course is to gain confidence with technical aspects of painting and to begin to establish an individual studio practice.

Faculty

Beginning Painting: From Observation to Narrative

Open , Seminar—Spring

In this course, students will be introduced to the materials and techniques of oil painting. There will be an examination of various strategies that fluctuate between specific in-class assignments and individual studio work. Color theory and color mixing will be an integral part of the course. We will focus primarily on portraiture and figure, as well as on the historical, psychological, and narrative implications of using a human form as a subject. There will be an exploration of studio-based strategies that will include working from observation and using mediated imagery such as film stills, photography, and art history. The course will culminate in an individual project that will be researched by the student and discussed during conferences and course critiques and will include a large-scale painting. In-class assignments will be supplemented with PowerPoint presentations, reading material, film clips and video screenings, group critiques, and homework projects. Students are required to work in the studio outside the class time in order to develop the work. The goal of the course is to gain confidence with technical aspects of painting and to begin to establish an individual studio practice.

Faculty

Previous Courses

Narrative Drawing

Open , Seminar—Spring

This course will explore ideas of narrative through drawing. How can space, time, light, and mark be used in drawing to create a narrative progression? Students will explore topics with relation to narrative, such as autobiography, political events, interdisciplinary connections, and other personally relevant content. In addition to investigating the history of the drawing medium, students will look closely at films, graphic novels and texts, and other sources for various strategies to construct a narrative. Observational drawing will be used as a point of departure to examine various strategies to construct a visual world. Students will proceed to develop technical and conceptual skills that are crucial to the drawing process. The work will fluctuate between specific in-class and homework assignments. In-class drawing assignments will be supplemented with presentations, film screenings, selected readings, field trips, and group critiques.

Faculty

Beginning Painting: Composite Constructions

Open , Seminar—Fall

This course is an introduction to the materials and techniques of oil painting. There will be an examination of various painting strategies that fluctuate between specific in-class assignments and individual conference projects. The primary focus will be an elaboration on rudimentary concepts such as color, tonal structure, spatial construction, painting surfaces, and composition. The fall semester focuses on the subject of still life and landscape, subjects that will be the starting point for experimentation with spatial structures ranging from direct observation to composite constructions. We will also explore narrative possibilities that landscape and still-life paintings can imply and examine the role of these subjects in the history of painting and other visual media. The course will culminate in an individual project that will be researched by the student and discussed during conferences and course critiques and will include a large-scale painting. In-class assignments will be supplemented with PowerPoint presentations, reading material, film clips and video screenings, group critiques, and homework projects. Students are required to work in the studio outside the class time in order to develop the work. The goal of the course is to gain confidence with technical aspects of painting and to begin to establish an individual studio practice.

Faculty

Beginning Painting: Narrative Structures

Open , Seminar—Spring

In this course, students will be introduced to the materials and techniques of oil painting. There will be an examination of various strategies that fluctuate between specific in-class assignments and individual studio work. Drawing, color theory, and color mixing will be an integral part of the course. We will focus primarily on portraiture and figure, as well as the historical, psychological, and narrative implications of using a human form as a subject. An exploration of studio-based strategies will include working from observation and using mediated imagery such as film stills, photography, and art history. The course will culminate in an individual project that will be researched by the student and discussed during conferences and course critiques and will include a large-scale painting. In-class assignments will be supplemented with PowerPoint presentations, reading material, film clips and video screenings, group critiques, and homework projects. Students are required to work in the studio outside the class time in order to develop the work. The goal of the course is to gain confidence with technical aspects of painting and to begin to establish an individual studio practice.

Faculty