James Hoch

Undergraduate Discipline

Writing

A dishwasher, cook, dockworker, social worker, and shepherd prior to joining the faculty at Ramapo College of New Jersey, his poems have since appeared in the Washington Post, American Poetry Review, Slate, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, and many others. Author of A Parade of Hands (Silverfish Review Press, 2003), which won the Gerald Cable Award, and Miscreants (W. W. Norton, 2007). Recipient of fellowships from the NEA (2007), Bread Loaf and Sewanee writers conferences, St Albans School for Boys, and Summer Literary Seminars; resident poet at The Frost Place (2008) and the Steinhardt Visiting Writer at Rutgers-Newark (2008). SLC, 2012–

Current undergraduate courses

Poetry Workshop: The Art of the Line and The Body That is Form

Fall

This course focuses on the craft of writing poetry. Students will engage in an intensive pursuit of finding the finest form that their poems can embrace. We will be driven by the usual concerns and obsessions that occupy the writing of poems (imagination, craft, revision, content, etc.) but will also delve into fundamental questions regarding the history and conceptualization of form and the poetic line. We will draw distinctions between line and sentence, speech and writing, shape and body, rendering and enactment, description and perception, disembodiment and incarnation, and rhetoric and music.

Faculty

Poetry Workshop: The Art of the Line and The Body That is Form

Spring

This course focuses on the craft of writing poetry. Students will engage in an intensive pursuit of finding the finest form that their poems can embrace. We will be driven by the usual concerns and obsessions that occupy the writing of poems (imagination, craft, revision, content, etc.) but will also delve into fundamental questions regarding the history and conceptualization of form and the poetic line. We will draw distinctions between line and sentence, speech and writing, shape and body, rendering and enactment, description and perception, disembodiment and incarnation, and rhetoric and music.

Faculty

Previous courses

Poetry of Inclusion

Fall

This poetry workshop will explore ways in which poems can be models for ethical living. Specifically we will consider pluralism in form and content and pluralism as both means and end in the making of contemporary poetry. That is, we will analyze poems and consider in our own poems, when possible, ways in which aesthetics can enact the ethic of pluralism. Among other concerns, we will discuss polymodality, multi-voicing, parataxis and collage as the means by which we understand wider ethical and emotional constructs. We will spend a fair amount of time focusing on specific poems as well as sequences and whole collections from a variety of poets such as: Rukeyser, Hass, Levis, CD Wright, Flynn, Rankine among others. While we are writing “in conversation” with this material, we will also be investigating how this material may or may not be conversant with notions of sincerity and authenticity. The course could be summed up as a series of questions: Is one more real by embracing the other or is that all just noise? Is noise a kind of music or a distraction? Are we singular and intense or expansive and intimate? Are we veins or fields? Do we lack both when we lack one?

Faculty

Poetry Writing Workshop - Line and Form 

Fall

This course focuses on the craft of writing poetry. Students will engage in an intensive pursuit of finding the finest form that their poems can embrace. We will be driven by the usual concerns and obsessions that occupy the writing of poems (imagination, craft, revision, content, etc.) but will delve into fundamental questions regarding the history and conceptualization of form and the poetic line. We will draw distinctions between line and sentence, speech and writing, shape and body, rendering and enactment, description and perception, disembodiment and incarnation, rhetoric and music.

Faculty