Angela Ferraiolo

BLS, State University of New York-Purchase. MFA, Hunter College. MFA (forthcoming), Brown University. Creator of Layoff (Tiltfactor Labs, New York), Earth and Beyond (MMORPG, Westwood Studios/Electronic Arts), Aidyn Chronicles (Nintendo 64, THQ). Her plays produced Off Broadway at The Brick Playhouse, La Mama Galleria, and Expanded Arts; her video work featured in Digital Fringe, Melbourne, Australia, and on die Gesellschafter.de, Bonn, Germany. Currently the Electronic Writing Fellow at Brown University, where she is working on new forms of interactive narrative; also the Internet art and Web cinema reviewer for Furtherfield.org, an arts collective based in London. SLC, 2010–

Current undergraduate courses

First-Year Studies: The Interactive City: Media Design for Public Spaces

FYS

Games played on the sides of buildings, animated media walls, interactive display tables...these are all examples of a new type of playable media called “public interactives.” This class teaches the basics of designing, programming, building, and installing civil spectacles. We will visit and analyze contemporary public interactives like those found in Times Square, art museums, theme parks, and digital memorials. Then, working individually and in groups, we’ll design and build small-scale spectacles of our own. The class will also survey the theories of public art, pervasive computing, and interaction design that describe the cultural implications of urban screens and digitally-mediated communication with large audiences.

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Game Studio: Radical Game Design

Spring

From Hopscotch to MolleIndustria, artists have used games and play as means of subverting power and systems. Games are small and viral. They emerge and disappear. They grip the online world obsessively or blend seamlessly into the underground. Above all, games are easily dismissed by authority, making them an ideal means of starting and spreading social and political dissonance. This class surveys radical game design as practiced by artists such as MoilleIndustria, Anne Marie Schleiner, Natalie Bookchin, Donna Leishman, Eddo Stern, Ian MacLarty, Rock Herms, and others. We will also consider the historical roots of radical design, which finds its beginnings in Dada, Surrealist, Fluxus, and Situationist games, and play methods explored by artists such as George Brecht, John Cage, and William Burroughs. The class provides a framework for exploring and creating these new media artworks. We’ll begin with the graphics techniques used to create and display digital imagery on 3D objects, then add interactivity with a bit of coding and plug-and-play sensor devices like LEAP and Kinect. Students will be encouraged to work individually and in groups to create both small-scale studio installations and architectural projections in a variety of styles and media. Artists surveyed include Light Surgeons, NuFormers, Klip Collective, Seeper, and Urbanscreen.

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New Media Lab: Playable Buildings

Fall

Projection mapping is a playable media technique that turns almost any surface into a dynamic display. Mapping is currently being applied in all areas, from architectural media and music festivals to dance clubs, performance, sculpture, gaming, machinima, and museum exhibits. This class provides a framework for exploring and creating these new media artworks. We’ll begin with the graphics techniques used to create and display digital imagery on 3D objects, then add interactivity with a bit of coding and plug-and-play sensor devices like LEAP and Kinect. Students will be encouraged to work individually and in groups to create both small-scale studio installations and architectural projections in a variety of styles and media. Artists surveyed include Light Surgeons, NuFormers, Klip Collective, Seeper, and Urbanscreen.

Faculty
Related Cross-Discipline Paths

Previous courses

Art Games, Creative Code, and Experimental Media

Fall

This class focuses on code, games, and experimental media as an environment for art making. Throughout the term, the class will look at the history of artists’ use of code, digital, and experimental media, including movements that have used games, game mechanics, play, and interactions as a response to and critique of the social conditions of their time. The class will also look at current media projects, such as generative art, mobile media, playable movies, electronic texts, and interactive video environments. Informed by these traditions, students will design and produce their own art games or media projects. An introduction to programming for the visual arts, the course will also cover basic arts programming skills, including statements, functions, arrays, loops, events, logic, program flow, and programmatic animation. Conference projects may include image manipulations, glitching, small games and interactive environments, hacks, mods, machinima, data visualizations, new-media filmmaking, expanded and future cinema, small experiments with video installation, and android projects for mobile platforms. No prior programming experience is required.

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Game Studio: Bad Guys

Spring

Barriers, boundaries, and no-go adversaries—for many players, a game is only as good as its obstacles, or “bad guys.” In this course, we’ll take an in-depth look at obstacles and how they operate in small mobile games. What makes a game “bad guy” fun as opposed to frustrating? How do programmers create obstacles that players can eventually defeat? How do designers create barriers that players are able to recognize as defeatable? What in-play clues contribute to “bad guys” that can first stop players, then help them learn to succeed? Students will build two small games in this class, each centered on a memorable “bad guy.” We’ll also look at some classic game barriers and consider how players feel about “bad guys” as they make their way past them.

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Game Studio: Games From Nothing

Fall

Starting with an empty code panel and a blank Android screen, this class encourages students to build small unusual games “live” and “on-the-spot,” one design concept and one line of code at a time. The idea is to experiment with color, motion, and sound while searching for simple behaviors that can be sequenced or combined to produce the “wave of interesting choices” that makes a game fun. This course will also survey digital artists who use interaction as an expressive tool and material for art making. Our goal is to create what’s new and interesting and sometimes weird but, above all, playable. No programming or video game background is required—or preferred. Android tablets will be provided for testing.

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Hacked, Glitched and Emergent Systems

Spring

This course investigates art inspired by error, noise, crash, and random processes. Paying special attention to the relevance that glitch and generative techniques have to new media, we will pursue the use of systems, simple rules, and random or semi-random events to create small hacks, glitches, games, and works of software art. We will also survey the work of contemporary noise & GLI.TC/H artists like Moradi, Satrom, Asendorf, Menckmen, and Briz. The goal is to build environments or to intervene in processes that the artist can set in motion or disrupt, giving these systems the means to continue, sometimes bizarrely, on their own. Any rule-based project or intervention is encouraged, especially small emergent games, machine hacks, software art, image and text glitching, recombinant video, and other generative media.  This class requires no hardware or programming background, though programmers, hex bashers, and circuit benders are welcome. Open.

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New Media Lab: Mapping the Invisible

Spring

The traditional ways of mapping the world rely on drawing objects that we can see with our eyes; but much of human experience is structured according to systems, networks, and connections that are largely unseen. What systems of meaning should be acknowledged when documenting our surroundings? What kinds of knowledge do we recognize in our sense of place? What is the difference—and what are the similarities—between our personal, cultural, and technological accountings of the world? Maps of the invisible can be based on any kind of connection perceived in a terrain. In this course, we’ll study landscapes that are both geographic and intangible—based on objective reality but also on memory, narrative, and systems of power—and reference artists, thinkers, cartographers, and geographers who are interested in manifestations of invisible systems while learning the basics of digital media production. Students will produce two individual map projects and contribute their own set of project markers to a larger collaborative map that we’ll design as a class. Readings will include the works of artists Trevor Paglan, Kathy Acker, Guy Debord, Fred Tomaselli, Paula Scher, Layla Kurtis, Alighiero Boetti, Joyce Kozloff, Ed Ruscha, and Susan Stockwell, as well as the writers Gloria Anzaldua, Amitav Ghosh, and Jorge Luis Borges.

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New Media Lab: Remix the City

Fall

How do you deal with the city in which you live? What is most visible in your town? What is, by now, barely legible? Or completely erased? What does not exist at all except in your imagination? This class teaches the basics of new media practice while looking at ways that artists respond to and remix the cities in which they live. We’ll survey all kinds of interventions— from guerilla projection to sticker novels and street art—and learn how some of these personal revisions of public space play off theories of architecture, economics, and critical media. Students will work on two small interventions of their own in this course, along with one larger class intervention. Artists referenced include: Martha Rosler, Banksy, Shepard Fairey, Franco and Eva Mattes, Jane and Louise Wilson, Alexander Kluge, Grazia Toderi, Yang Yongliang, and more. Both analog and digital projects are welcome.

Faculty

Third Screen: Playable Media for Mobile Devices

Year

This yearlong class will guide beginning developers through design and production for mobile tablets, including art games, interactive movies, experimental media, playable anime, electronic books, and smart slideshows. The year is divided into five sequences: Studio One: tech bootcamp, mini-projects and tutorials; Studio Two: interface design, narrative strategy, mechanics, interaction design, responsive environment, and early project prototyping; Studio Three: creation of media assets, plans for managing and persisting data, and early code builds or project alphas; Studio Four: final build (beta) and play testing; and Studio Five: creation of surrounding materials and the possible release of finished applications to the Google Play marketplace. Students will be required to attend two additional tech workshops early in September: Workshop One: Corona Engine and Android software development kit; Workshop Two: Box2d Physics Library. The best qualification for the class is a good idea for an interactive project; no programming or design experience is necessary. Kindle Fires and Nexus 7s will be provided for testing.

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