Angela Ferraiolo

BLS, SUNY–Purchase. MFA, CUNY Hunter College. MFA, Brown University. Professional work includes RKO, H20 Studios, Westwood Studios, Electronic Arts, Hansen Literary. Solo and group screenings in the United States and Europe, including SIGGRAPH (Los Angeles), ISEA (Hong Kong), New York Film Festival, Courtisane Festival (Ghent), Collectif Jeune Cinéma (Paris), Copacabana Media Festival (Ghent), Australian Experimental Film Festival (Melbourne), International Conference of Generative Art (Rome), Digital Fringe (Melbourne), Die Gesellschafter Filmwettbewerb (Germany), Granoff Center for the Arts (Providence), Microscope Gallery (Bushwick), Nouspace Gallery (Vancouver), D-Art Gallery (London), International Conference on Information Visualization (Montpellier), International Conference of Computer Graphics, Imaging and Visualization (Taiwan), and TechFest (Mumbai). Interests include interaction design, narrative, immersive environment, playability, mobile art, experimental video, generative art, installation, media architecture, and new media urbanism. SLC, 2010–

Undergraduate Courses 2018-2019

Visual and Studio Arts

First-Year Studies: New Genres: Drawing Machines

Open , FYS—Year

In 2016, So Kanno and Takahiro Yamaguchi used skateboards and pendulums to create “The Senseless Drawing Bot,” a self-propelling device that sprays abstract lines on walls. Meanwhile, François Xavier Saint Georges used power tools to create “The Roto,” a small circular machine that prints orbital graphite patterns on flat surfaces. In 2011, Eske Rex, a designer in Copenhagen, built two nine-foot towers to stage a double harmonograph for Milan Design Week. Joseph Griffiths uses exercise bikes. Alex Kiessling uses robot arms. Olafur Eliasson simply vibrates balls covered in ink across paper. For centuries, artists have been obsessed with machines that make pictures; today, their ongoing experiments with software, robots, and weird bizarro contraptions have become a core aspect of the studio’s relationship to technology. While many drawing machines look backward through history for ideas about mechanized art, contemporary projects are often based on computer programs that engage programming as an artistic practice. Part art studio, part history, part programming, and part mad scientist lab with a bit of eBay salvage thrown in, the goal of this FYS course is to study the history of drawing machines with the intent of turning ordinary objects into marvelous machines and goofy gadgets that know how to draw—hopefully, in a way all their own.

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Game Studio: Level Design

Sophomore and above , Small seminar—Fall

This is a guided code and tutorial class designed to introduce students to the basic tools, concepts, and techniques used in game development, including games programming basics, game art, sound effects, music, narrative design, interactables, and game mechanics. Taught in Unity 2D/C#, with Pyskel, Tiled, and LMMS Studio.

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Art From Code

Open , Small seminar—Fall

This course is a “live-coding,” practice-based introduction to visual-arts programming—including color, shape, transformations, and motion—designed for artists with little or no prior programming experience. We’ll meet twice weekly to code together live—working on short, in-class exercises within a larger analysis of the social, cultural, and historical nature of programming cultures. All students will be required to keep a sketchbook and participate in installation. Artists include Reas, Davis, Riley, MacDonald, and others. Taught in p5js, HTML5, and Processing.

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Game Studio: Nonlinear and Interactive Narratives

Sophomore and above , Small seminar—Spring

Prerequisite: Game Studio: Level Design

>As more stories are delivered on interactive devices, our idea of narrative keeps changing. This course explores the strategies of nonlinear, multilinear, modular, and interactive forms of design while analyzing several examples of the nonlinear story design found in games, electronic literature, and interactive art. Students will develop the critical tools to create and analyze interactive projects. All students will keep a sketchbook, participate in game night, develop one nonlinear or interactive narrative, and write one five-page design document. Artists include Leishman, Gysin, Eco, Calvino, Mateas, and others. Taught in Unity 2D/C#, with Pyskel, Tiled, and LMMS Studio.

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New Genres: Systems Aesthetics

Sophomore and above , Small seminar—Spring

Prerequisite: Art from Code

From Gordon Pask’s Colloquy of Mobiles to Paolo Cirio’s Google Will Eat Itself, the shift from object to process or system has had a profound influence on contemporary art. This class looks at the history, theory, and practice of systems aesthetics through art making, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and writing. Class time consists of demonstrations of technique, balanced with presentations of artist examples and discussions of systems theorists presenting these practices within the broader social, material, and political aspects of the field. Artists and theorists include Benjamin, Weaver, Shannon, Burnham. Ascott, Luhmann, and others.

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Previous Courses

Game Studio: Nonlinear and Interactive Narrative

Sophomore and above , Small seminar—Fall

As more stories are delivered on interactive devices, our idea of narrative keeps changing. This course explores the strategies of nonlinear, multilinear, modular, and interactive forms of design, while analyzing several examples of the nonlinear story design found in games, electronic literature, and interactive art. Students will develop the critical tools to create and analyze interactive projects. All students will keep a sketchbook, participate in game night, develop one nonlinear or interactive narrative, and write one five-page design document. Artists include Leishman, Gysin, Eco, Calvino, Mateas, and others. Taught in Unity 2D/C#, with Pyskel, Tiled, and GarageBand.

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New Genres: Cultural HiJack

Sophomore and above , Small seminar—Fall

Is art the new politics? Cultural HiJack examines the work of artists attempting to subvert, critique, and overthrow the dominant paradigm though street art, anti-advertising, meme wars, flash mobs, instant theatre, guerilla projection, and spatial intervention. Artists surveyed include Guerrilla Girls, RTMark, Rosler, Holzer, Marchessault, Banksy, Fairey, Acconci, and Franco and Eva Mattes, along with readings from Dery, Klein, Debord, Gramsci, Lacy, and others. Working either individually or in small groups, students will collaborate on campaigns of détournement, designing and implementing inventions of their own through alternative and hybrid forms.

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Digital Tools for Artists

Open , Seminar—Spring

This course provides fundamental instruction in art installation. Students will learn the basics of digital imaging, interaction, spatial design, and video mapping while working toward proficiency with the tools of installation art. We will meet twice weekly, once for a skills workshop and again for a guided work session. Artists surveyed include Albers, Klimt, Kusama, Menard, Mock, Nakamura, Holzer, and others. Taught in Photoshop, After Effects, VPT, and Max/MSP Jitter.

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Game Studio: Radical Game Design

Sophomore and above , Small seminar—Spring

From Hopscotch to MolleIndustria, game designers have used play as a means of imprinting culture and subverting power. Games are small and viral. They emerge and disappear. They grip the online world obsessively or blend seamlessly into the underground. Above all, games are easily dismissed by authority, making them an ideal means of spreading social and political dissonance. This class surveys radical game design as practiced by artists like MoilleIndustria, Anne Marie Schleiner, Natalie Bookchin, Donna Leishman, Eddo Stern, Ian MacLarty, and others. We will also consider the historical roots of radical design, which finds its beginnings in Dada, Surrealist, Fluxus, and Situationist games, and play methods explored by artists like George Brecht, John Cage, and William Burroughs. Taught in Unity 2D/C#, with Pyskel, Tiled, and GarageBand.

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New Genres: Interactive Art

Sophomore and above , Small seminar—Spring

Prerequisite: Art from Code or Digital Tools for Artists.

This course focuses on the cutting-edge technologies behind interactive art and dynamic installation. Students will work in a programming environment called Max/MSP/Jitter to create installations that dynamically generate on-screen visuals, spectacle, and noise while combining multiple types of media to create an overall theme. Topics include an introduction to Max, basic patching, control logic, external/live video input, reactive visuals, color/object tracking, openCV in Jitter, sensors, and the glitch aesthetic. Artists surveyed are Ikeda, Rokeby, Benson, Liddell, TeamLAB, and others. Taught in MAX/MSP Jitter with LEAP, Kinect, sensors, and cameras.

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New Genres: I EXPECT YOU TO DIE—Algorithms and Performance

Intermediate , Small seminar—Fall

I EXPECT YOU TO DIE is a special collaboration between New Genres/Playable Buildings and SLC Theatre. The course will explore the algorithm as an expression of mind, a type of consciousness, a method by which we unpack and reorganize research and source material, as well as utilize as a set of rules that the performance can follow. In this inaugural version of algorithmic theatre, students will first deconstruct the villains from three classic James Bond films with lines of inquiry into the cultural, sociopolitical, artistic/aesthetic, and philosophical structures found there. Next, blending code, video mapping, and live performance, students will write a series of algorithms that “remix” the scripts, visuals, gestures, and narrative elements of these Bond films to create an entirely new stage version of the Bond villains and their eternal struggle against 007. The class will meet once a week for the first eight weeks and then add four evenings and one weekend daytime for three more weeks, as we shift into a rehearsal process culminating in two performances.

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New Genres: History, Theory, Practice/System Aesthetics

Intermediate , Small seminar—Spring

From Gordon Pask’s Colloquy of Mobiles to Paolo Cirio's Google Will Eat Itself, the shift from object to process or system has had a profound influence on contemporary art. This class looks at the history, theory, and practice of system aesthetics through art making, readings, lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques, and writing. Class time consists of demonstrations of technique, balanced with presentations of artist examples and discussions of systems theorists, presenting these practices within the broader social, material, and political aspects of the field. Artists and theorists include Benjamin, Weaver, Shannon, Burnham. Ascott, Luhmann, and others.

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First-Year Studies: The Interactive City: Media Design for Public Spaces

Open , FYS

Games played on the sides of buildings, animated media walls, interactive display tables...these are all examples of a new type of playable media called “public interactives.” This class teaches the basics of designing, programming, building, and installing civil spectacles. We will visit and analyze contemporary public interactives like those found in Times Square, art museums, theme parks, and digital memorials. Then, working individually and in groups, we’ll design and build small-scale spectacles of our own. The class will also survey the theories of public art, pervasive computing, and interaction design that describe the cultural implications of urban screens and digitally-mediated communication with large audiences.

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New Media Lab: Playable Buildings

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

Projection mapping is a playable media technique that turns almost any surface into a dynamic display. Mapping is currently being applied in all areas, from architectural media and music festivals to dance clubs, performance, sculpture, gaming, machinima, and museum exhibits. This class provides a framework for exploring and creating these new media artworks. We’ll begin with the graphics techniques used to create and display digital imagery on 3D objects, then add interactivity with a bit of coding and plug-and-play sensor devices like LEAP and Kinect. Students will be encouraged to work individually and in groups to create both small-scale studio installations and architectural projections in a variety of styles and media. Artists surveyed include Light Surgeons, NuFormers, Klip Collective, Seeper, and Urbanscreen.

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