Matthew Ellis

Christian A. Johnson Endeavor Foundation Chair in Middle Eastern Studies and International Affairs

BA, Williams College. MPhil, University of Oxford. MA, PhD, Princeton University. Specializes in the social, intellectual, and cultural history of the modern Middle East. Research addresses the relationship between nationalism, territoriality, and political identity in Egypt and the late Ottoman Empire. His book manuscript, provisionally titled Desert Borderland: Bedouins, Territoriality, and the Making of Modern Egypt and Libya, examines the impact of various state-making projects on local experiences of place and belonging in the desert region linking Egypt and Libya during the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Broader intellectual and teaching interests include: the politics and culture of nationalism; modernity and identity formation in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman Arab world; cities and imagined urbanism; nostalgia and the politics of collective memory; popular culture; the historiography of borderlands; comparative British and French empire; and the history of geography and cartography. Articles published in History Compass and The Long 1890s in Egypt: Colonial Quiescence, Subterranean Resistance (Edinburgh UP, 2014). Dissertation research was supported by grants from the Social Science Research Council and the American Research Center in Egypt. Recipient of a Fulbright-IIE grant to Egypt. Member of the American Historical Association and the Middle East Studies Association of North America. SLC, 2012–

Undergraduate discipline: History

Courses taught in History

Courses from previous years

2013-2014
  • First-Year Studies: Place, Landscape, and Identity in the Middle East
  • Popular Culture in the Modern Middle East
  • Women and Gender in the Middle East
2012-2013
  • Cities of the Middle East
  • History and the ‘Arab Spring’
  • The Emergence of the Modern Middle East

Connect with Matthew Ellis

Matthew  Ellis

Matthew Ellis