Beth Ann Ditkoff

BA, Yale University. MD, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Former surgical oncologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center; Department of Surgery, College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University. Author of The Thyroid Guide (HarperCollins, 2000) and Why Don’t Your Eyelashes Grow? Curious Questions Kids Ask About the Human Body (Penguin, 2008). SLC, 2010–

Undergraduate Courses 2022-2023

Biology

General Biology Series: Anatomy and Physiology

Open, Seminar—Fall

Anatomy is the branch of science that investigates the bodily structure of living organisms, while physiology is the study of the normal functions of those organisms. In this course, we will explore the human body in both health and disease. Focus will be placed on the major body units, such as skin, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. By emphasizing concepts and critical thinking rather than rote memorization, we will make associations between anatomical structures and their functions. The course will have a clinical approach to health and illness, with examples drawn from medical disciplines such as radiology, pathology, and surgery. Laboratory work will include dissections and microscope work. A final conference paper is required at the conclusion of the course; the topic will be chosen by each student to emphasize the relevance of anatomy/physiology to our understanding of the human body.

Faculty

Previous Courses

Biology

General Biology Series: Anatomy and Physiology

Open, Seminar—Spring

Anatomy is the branch of science that explores the bodily structure of living organisms, while physiology is the study of the normal functions of those organisms. In this course, we will explore the human body in both health and disease. Focus will be placed on the major body units, such as skin, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. By emphasizing concepts rather than the memorization of facts, we will make associations between anatomical structures and their functions. The course will have a clinical approach to health and illness, with examples drawn from medical disciplines such as radiology, pathology and surgery. A final conference paper is required at the conclusion of the course; the topic will be chosen by each student to emphasize the relevance of anatomy/physiology to our understanding of the human body.

Faculty