Kevin Confoy

BA, Rutgers College. Certificate, London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA). Graduate, The Conservatory at the Classic Stage Company (CSC), Playwrights Horizons Theatre School Directing Program. Actor, director, and producer of Off Broadway and regional productions; resident director, Forestburgh Playhouse; producer/producing artistic director, Sarah Lawrence theatre program (1994-2008); executive producer, Ensemble Studio Theatre, New York (1992-94); associate artistic director, Elysium Theatre Company, New York (1990-92); manager, development/marketing departments of Circle Repertory Company, New York. Recipient of two grants from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation; OBIE Award, Outstanding Achievement Off and Off-Off Broadway (producer, E.S.T. Marathon of One-Act Plays); nomination, Drama Desk Award, Outstanding Revival of a Play (acting company); director, first (original) productions of 13 published plays. SLC, 1994–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Theatre

Actor’s Workshop: Incognito: The Craft of Assumed Identity

Open , Component—Year

This class meets twice a week.

An approach to performance that focuses on external applications as a method of building a character—working with costumes, props, make-up, and tangible aspects of production, as well as voice, dialects, gesture, and given behavior—students will develop an “outside-in” technique that allows for the full physical and emotional expression of a character and the text.

Faculty

Breaking the Code

Intermediate , Component—Year

Open to both actors and directors. This class meets twice a week.

A specific text-driven approach to acting, Breaking the Code provides a context for the most vital performances based upon a way of dissecting a play and determining a character’s behavior. Students will act scenes from contemporary plays and adaptations.

Faculty

Spring Musical

Open , Component—Year

Required audition and interview held during registration week.

Students in this class will become the company of the Theatre Program’s Main Stage Spring Musical. Classes will provide for an in-depth rehearsal process and allow for an extended study of the show in its greater context. Students will work together on the songs, scenes, dance and movement, and book of this musical in a traditional manner, with class time dedicated to rehearsals with the director, musical director, and creative team of the production. In addition, students will have a distinct opportunity to study and participate in the show at a level of far greater discovery and intensive preparation than a standard rehearsal period allows. First semester work will include meetings with the show’s designers, extended work on the text and characters, and in-class rehearsals. All aspects of the show—its relevance and significance in a historical context, its production history and place in the canon of musicals, as well as a study of its composer and creators of similar works of its kind—will be discussed and become part of regular class work. Also in the first semester, students will be expected to meet out of class for rehearsals on designated scenes, songs, etc., as they would in a traditional scene study class. Students will be assigned to research and report back to the cast certain aspects of the show and its history. Second semester work will move to a concentration on production and will include a regular period of out-of-class nightly rehearsals on a pre-determined schedule. Students interested in directing plays and musicals will be given specific aspects/scenes/songs of the show to be rehearsed and worked on under the guidance of the teachers. Student directors in the class will become part of the discussion of the design and production elements of the show. Students in this class are free to participate in shows outside of class in the first semester. In the second semester, students may not participate in any production that has rehearsals or performances that conflict with the schedule of this production. All principal and featured roles in the show will be cast from within this class.

Faculty

Crisis Mode: Theatre From the Late 1960s Through Today

Open , Component—Year

This class meets twice a week.

Crisis Mode examines how theatre has responded to certain events of historical significance and moments of crisis. It is of particular value to those directors, actors, and theatre makers/producers interested in an expansive view of theatre and in how and why a play can change the way we think. The course provides a working foundation for performance and production. We will examine plays and playwrights and theatre movements and styles that have developed and come to expression in the past several decades. Students will discuss a variety of plays, with an emphasis on looking at the world in which those plays were written and why they continue to resonate today. Students will study documentaries and make presentations on events of historical/political/cultural significance as a way of providing a play with a rich context for production and performance. We will concentrate on American plays and political movements but will encompass a global and cultural perspective with discussion ranging from the influential works and innovations of Brecht and Beckett to political theatre groups like El Teatro Campesino of the 1960s, to agitprop theatre events like those of the Vietnam War and Civil Rights eras, and to those of ACT UP in the 1980s AIDS Crisis. Students in Crisis Mode will devise projects to serve their particular theatre interests. Projects range from staging and acting scenes to design work, dramaturgical presentations, and original plays written in the style/spirit of the events studied.

Faculty

Graduate Courses

Theatre 2017-2018

Actor’s Workshop: Incognito: The Craft of Assumed Identity

Open , Component—Year

This class meets twice a week.

An approach to performance that focuses on external applications as a method of building a character—working with costumes, props, make-up, and tangible aspects of production, as well as voice, dialects, gesture, and given behavior—students will develop an “outside-in” technique that allows for the full physical and emotional expression of a character and the text.

Faculty

Breaking the Code

Intermediate , Component—Year

Open to both actors and directors. This class meets twice a week.

A specific text-driven approach to acting, Breaking the Code provides a context for the most vital performances based upon a way of dissecting a play and determining a character’s behavior. Students will act scenes from contemporary plays and adaptations.

Faculty

Crisis Mode: Theatre From the Late 1960s Through Today

Open , Component—Year

This class meets twice a week.

Crisis Mode examines how theatre has responded to certain events of historical significance and moments of crisis. It is of particular value to those directors, actors, and theatre makers/producers interested in an expansive view of theatre and in how and why a play can change the way we think. The course provides a working foundation for performance and production. We will examine plays and playwrights and theatre movements and styles that have developed and come to expression in the past several decades. Students will discuss a variety of plays, with an emphasis on looking at the world in which those plays were written and why they continue to resonate today. Students will study documentaries and make presentations on events of historical/political/cultural significance as a way of providing a play with a rich context for production and performance. We will concentrate on American plays and political movements but will encompass a global and cultural perspective with discussion ranging from the influential works and innovations of Brecht and Beckett to political theatre groups like El Teatro Campesino of the 1960s, to agitprop theatre events like those of the Vietnam War and Civil Rights eras, and to those of ACT UP in the 1980s AIDS Crisis. Students in Crisis Mode will devise projects to serve their particular theatre interests. Projects range from staging and acting scenes to design work, dramaturgical presentations, and original plays written in the style/spirit of the events studied.

Faculty

Spring Musical

Open , Component—Year

Required audition and interview held during registration week.

Students in this class will become the company of the Theatre Program’s Main Stage Spring Musical. Classes will provide for an in-depth rehearsal process and allow for an extended study of the show in its greater context. Students will work together on the songs, scenes, dance and movement, and book of this musical in a traditional manner, with class time dedicated to rehearsals with the director, musical director, and creative team of the production. In addition, students will have a distinct opportunity to study and participate in the show at a level of far greater discovery and intensive preparation than a standard rehearsal period allows. First semester work will include meetings with the show’s designers, extended work on the text and characters, and in-class rehearsals. All aspects of the show—its relevance and significance in a historical context, its production history and place in the canon of musicals, as well as a study of its composer and creators of similar works of its kind—will be discussed and become part of regular class work. Also in the first semester, students will be expected to meet out of class for rehearsals on designated scenes, songs, etc., as they would in a traditional scene study class. Students will be assigned to research and report back to the cast certain aspects of the show and its history. Second semester work will move to a concentration on production and will include a regular period of out-of-class nightly rehearsals on a pre-determined schedule. Students interested in directing plays and musicals will be given specific aspects/scenes/songs of the show to be rehearsed and worked on under the guidance of the teachers. Student directors in the class will become part of the discussion of the design and production elements of the show. Students in this class are free to participate in shows outside of class in the first semester. In the second semester, students may not participate in any production that has rehearsals or performances that conflict with the schedule of this production. All principal and featured roles in the show will be cast from within this class.

Faculty

Previous Courses

Forensics: Actor and Director Lab

Advanced , Component—Year

Open to graduate and advance undergraduate students interested in both acting and directing. This class meets twice a week.

Forensics is a production class for actors and directors. Students will read, analyze, direct, and act in a wide variety of one-act plays from a cross-section of periods and styles in a way of working that puts shared emphasis upon the text and its context. Forensics students form their own actor and director ensemble. Students present their work as part of the theatre program’s second-semester season. Classwork includes discussion of the playwrights and the time periods that gave their plays shape and resonance, along with a practical overview of the production process. It is understood that students in Forensics will have a range of acting and/or directing experience. Emphasis is placed on determining what is common for both actors and the director in staging a play. Over the course of the full year and in presentation, students will be expected to both act and direct.

Faculty

Forensics: Actor and Director Lab

Advanced , Component—Year

Open to graduate and advance undergraduate students interested in both acting and directing. This class meets twice a week.

Forensics is a production class for actors and directors. Students will read, analyze, direct, and act in a wide variety of one-act plays from a cross-section of periods and styles in a way of working that puts shared emphasis upon the text and its context. Forensics students form their own actor and director ensemble. Students present their work as part of the theatre program’s second-semester season. Classwork includes discussion of the playwrights and the time periods that gave their plays shape and resonance, along with a practical overview of the production process. It is understood that students in Forensics will have a range of acting and/or directing experience. Emphasis is placed on determining what is common for both actors and the director in staging a play. Over the course of the full year and in presentation, students will be expected to both act and direct.

Faculty

Forensics: Actors and Directors Lab

Advanced , Component—Year

Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students interested in both acting and directing. This class meets twice a week.

Forensics is a production class for actors and directors. Students will read, analyze, direct, and act in a wide variety of one-act plays from a cross-section of periods and styles in a way of working that puts shared emphasis upon the text and its context. Forensics students form their own actor and director ensemble. Students present their work as part of the theatre program’s second-semester season. Classwork includes discussion of the playwrights and the time periods that gave their plays shape and resonance and a practical overview of the production process. It is understood that students in Forensics will have a range of acting and/or directing experience. Emphasis is placed upon determining what is common for both actors and director in staging a play. Over the course of the full year and in presentation, students will be expected to both act and direct.

Faculty

FORENSICS Actor and Director Lab

Advanced , Component—Year

Open to graduate and advance undergraduate students interested in both acting and directing. This class meets twice a week.

This class is an approach to performance and production that puts shared emphasis upon the text and the context in which a play was written. In the first semester, students will read, analyze, and study a wide variety of plays from a cross-section of periods and styles. Class work will include scene study, as well as discussion of the plays and playwrights and the time periods that gave them shape and resonance. To that end, students—as a group—will read and work on at least one given play per week. In the second semester, emphasis will be placed on performance, leading to the production of short plays to be presented as part of the theatre program’s spring season. Material presented in that production will be culled from the plays, playwrights, or genres studied in the first semester. Discussion in the second semester will include a far-reaching overview of the production process, from the selection of play and cast to the technical requirements of production and the vocabulary necessary to communicate with designers in production meetings. Over the course of the full year, students will be expected to both act and direct.

Faculty