Nadeen M. Thomas

Undergraduate Discipline

History

Graduate Program

Women's History Program

BA, University of Pennsylvania. MSEd, Hunter College, CUNY. PhD, CUNY Graduate Center. Research interests include immigration, race, ethnicity, education systems, and nationalism in the United States and Europe. Also interested in the relationship between the built environment and social organization and how the layout of urban areas creates spaces of belonging and nonbelonging. Recently presented research on the French antiveiling laws and the reinterpretation of public and private spaces, the Parisian public transportation system and its role in structuring geographic and social mobility, and the Parisian botanical gardens as an agent and symbol of national identity. SLC, 2015–

Undergraduate Courses 2019-2020

History

Diversity and Equity in Education: Issues of Gender, Race, and Class

Advanced , Seminar—Year

The education system is a central institution in the socialization of young people and the maintenance of the modern nation-state. Schools support meritocratic models of society by providing opportunities for social mobility. Paradoxically, schools also reproduce gender, racial, and class inequality. In this course, we will examine the roles that schools play in the transmission of culture, formation of identity, and reproduction of social structures. Paying special attention to gender and its intersection with other social categories, we will look at practices and policies that shape students’ performance as they strive for competence, achievement, and acceptance. We will also analyze the larger political and economic contexts that shape both schools and the communities in which they are situated.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Graduate Courses

Women's History 2019-2020

Diversity and Equity in Education: Issues of Gender, Race, and Class

Graduate Seminar—Year

The education system is a central institution in the socialization of young people and the maintenance of the modern nation-state. Schools support meritocratic models of society by providing opportunities for social mobility. Paradoxically, schools also reproduce gender, racial, and class inequality. In this course, we will examine the roles that schools play in the transmission of culture, formation of identity, and reproduction of social structures. Paying special attention to gender and its intersection with other social categories, we will look at practices and policies that shape students’ performance as they strive for competence, achievement, and acceptance. We will also analyze the larger political and economic contexts that shape both schools and the communities in which they are situated.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

History Colloquium

Graduate Seminar—Year

Core class required of all first-year women’s history graduate students.

Students in this course undertake independent projects in close consultation with the instructor. The projects range widely, from primary research and explorations of historiography to fieldwork and internships at agencies engaged in advocacy, policymaking, public history, or other initiatives of interest to women’s historians. While students pursue individual goals and meet one-to-one with the instructor, the whole class convenes several times each term for dinner, presentations on independent projects, and discussion of common concerns.

Faculty