Samuel B. Seigle

BA, University of Pittsburgh. AM, Harvard University. Classical philologist; scholar of Greek dance, Greek and Roman poetic structure, linguistics, ancient religions and mythology, political and social conventions of ancient cultures and their relationship to the contemporary world; president (1973-1975) and censor (1977-1993) of New York Classical Club. SLC, 1964–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Greek (Ancient)

Intermediate Greek

Intermediate , Seminar—Year

This course has two aims: to develop the student’s ability to read Greek intelligently and fluently and to give the student a general understanding of Greek history and literature. The authors to be read will be determined at the time of registration.

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Advanced Greek

Advanced , Seminar—Year

This course has two aims: to extend the student’s ability to read classical Greek and to deepen the student’s appreciation of the literary traditions of the Greeks. The authors to be read will be determined at the time of registration.

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Latin

Beginning Latin

Open , Seminar—Year

This course provides an intensive introduction to Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, with a view to reading the language as soon as possible. Close reading of Vergil’s Aeneid in English will accompany intensive language study in the fall. By midsemester, students will be translating authentic excerpts of Latin poetry and prose. During the spring semester, while continuing to develop and refine their knowledge of Latin grammar and vocabulary, students will read selections of the Aeneid in Latin.

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Literature

The Greco-Roman World: Its Origins, Crises, Turning Points, and Final Transformations

Open , Seminar—Year

This course invites the serious student to penetrate the tides of time in order to uncover what really lies behind the making of ancient Greece and Rome from their earliest times to their final transformations. The aimed-for result is a more deeply informed understanding of their direct contribution to us; namely, the classical tradition that still shapes our thinking and exercises our imagination. The methodologies employed will be derived as much from the fields of anthropology and sociology as from those of political science, economics, archaeology, and religious studies. The particular topics pursued will be set through joint decision by class members and the teacher but anchored always in the reality of what these two gifted peoples experienced—or believed to be their experience. To further this goal, all conferences will be in small groups, and all papers will be written as joint productions rather than as individual conclusions. A model for this procedure will be established in the first two weeks of the fall semester through the class’s multidisciplinary reading, in translation, of important selections from Homer’s Iliad.

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Previous Courses

Beginning Greek

Open , Seminar—Year

This course provides an intensive introduction to Ancient Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, with the aim of reading authentic excerpts of Ancient Greek poetry and prose as soon as possible. Students will also read and discuss several dialogues of Plato in English. During the spring semester, while continuing to refine their grammar and reading skills, students will read extended selections of Plato’s Apology in the original Greek. Conference projects can also include science and linguistics.

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Advanced Latin

Advanced , Seminar—Year

This course will explore the literature, history, and politics of the Late Roman Republic, with particular emphasis on the tumultuous years from the death of Sulla (78 BCE) to the death of Caesar (44 BCE). Closely examining works of Catullus, Lucretius, Cicero, Caesar, and Sallust, we will consider how the violent struggle for political power resulted in the demise of republican government and the centralization of authority in the hands of one individual. Class discussions and writing assignments will assess the relationship between intellectual views and political action during this critical moment in Western history. The course will be taught in conjunction with Literature in Translation: The Age of Caesar. Students will attend seminar meetings and, in addition, develop and refine their reading comprehension skills by reading selections of the seminar texts in Latin for their conference work. Reading assignments will be read in their entirety in English. Additional conference hours and grammar review will be included, as necessary. Conference projects can also include science and linguistics.

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Intermediate Latin

Intermediate , Seminar—Year

This course will explore the literature, history, and politics of the Late Roman Republic, with particular emphasis on the tumultuous years from the death of Sulla (78 BCE) to the death of Caesar (44 BCE). Closely examining works of Catullus, Lucretius, Cicero, Caesar, and Sallust, we will consider how the violent struggle for political power resulted in the demise of republican government and the centralization of authority in the hands of one individual. Class discussions and writing assignments will assess the relationship between intellectual views and political action during this critical moment in Western history. Students will attend seminar meetings and, in addition, develop and refine their reading comprehension skills by reading selections of the seminar texts in Latin for their conference work. Reading assignments will be read in their entirety in English. Additional conference hours and grammar review will be included, as necessary. Conference projects can also include science and linguistics.

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