Gina Philogene

PhD, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. Interests in social and cultural psychology, history of psychology, race, and social identity, as well as social representations. Author of From Black to African American: A New Representation, The Representations of the Social: Bridging Theoretical Traditions (with Kay Deaux), Racial Identity in Context: The Legacy of Kenneth B. Clark, and the forthcoming How the Right Made It Wrong: Names in the Shadow of the Political Correctness. Recipient of several grants, including the National Science Foundation and the American Psychological Association. Published several articles in professional journals and currently an associate editor of the Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology. SLC, 1998–

Undergraduate Courses 2018-2019

Psychology

Crossing Borders and Boundaries: The Social Psychology of Immigration

Open , Lecture—Spring

Immigration is a worldwide phenomenon whereby people move into another nation with the intention of making a better life for themselves and/or residing there temporarily or permanently. While anchored in a multidisciplinary perspective, this seminar explores the crucial role of psychology in understanding the processes associated with our conceptualizations of immigrants and immigration. The course begins with some theoretical perspectives on immigration, as well as a brief historical overview of sociological and social psychological research on immigrants. We then examine the identity of the immigrant, stressing the profound distinctions between forced and voluntary immigrants. We will analyze the processes through which “illegality” is constructed by reflecting on the lives of undocumented immigrants. We will look at how the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, and culture shape the psychological experience of immigrants. Seeking to extend our analysis to immigration’s impact on the host population, we conclude the course by discussing several social psychological issues such as intergroup relations, discrimination, and modes of adaptation.

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The Historical Evolution of Psychological Thought

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

This seminar aims at presenting the historical evolution of psychology as a distinct discipline, starting with Wundt in 1879 at Leipzig. Its short history notwithstanding, psychology has benefited from a long and rich past—tracing its roots, for the most part, in philosophy. As early as the fifth century B.C., Aristotle and other Greek scholars grappled with some of the same problems that concern psychologists today; namely, memory, learning, motivation, perception, dreams, and abnormal behavior. A discipline such as psychology does not develop in a vacuum but, rather, is shaped by human personalities, institutions, and the societal context. Therefore, our critical and historical analyses will focus on comprehending the cultural context from which ideas, concepts, and theories have emerged and evolved. This approach will provide a unifying framework for a thorough reexamination of the different systems of psychology in the United States.

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Previous Courses

The Human Legacy

Intermediate , Seminar—Year

Our "human legacy" is the result of a long journey. Considering our physiological, psychological, and social changes over time, these evolutionary transformations point to the fundamentally social nature of our human history. We have always had an incessant need to articulate common systems and points of reference in order to make sense of our world. Such common understanding of social reality requires the elaboration of representations around which groups form. These representations are social and serve the purpose of structuring our relations with one another and validating our common reality. In so doing, our social reality is constructed and social identities are created. Against this background, we will explore in this course how we, as humans, have been driven to develop into what we are today. To help us understand the constructive, dynamic, and social nature of our evolution, we will revisit one of the more obscure books in social psychology, The Human Legacy, written by Leon Festinger—one of the most famous social psychologists of the 20th century. This book analyzes some of the crucial elements of our evolution that have permitted the steady and continuous progress in our history. Key questions addressed in this book are more than relevant for our time, including the development of technology and its relation to religion, the implications of sedentary living, the production of food, and the human race's self-destructive propensity for warfare.

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First-Year Studies: Crossing Borders and Boundaries: The Social Psychology of Immigration

Open , FYS

“Remember, remember always, that all of us…are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.”Franklin D. Roosevelt

Immigration is a worldwide phenomenon, where people move into another nation with the intention of making a better life for themselves and/or residing there temporarily or permanently. While anchored in a multidisciplinary perspective, this class explores the crucial role of social psychology in understanding the processes associated with our conceptualizations of immigrants and immigration. The course begins with some theoretical perspectives on immigration, as well as a brief historical overview of sociological and social-psychological research on immigrants and immigration. We then examine the identity of the immigrant, stressing the profound distinctions between forced and voluntary immigrants. We will analyze the processes by which “illegality” is constructed by reflecting the lives of undocumented immigrants. We will look at how the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, and culture shape the psychological experience of immigrants. Seeking to extend our analysis to immigration’s impact on the host population, we conclude the course by discussing several social-psychological issues such as the intergroup relations, discrimination, and modes of adaptation.

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