Roland Dollinger

Roland Dollinger

Undergraduate Discipline

German

BA, University of Augsburg, Germany. MA, University of Pittsburgh. PhD, Princeton University. Special interest in 20th-century German and Austrian literature; author of Totalität und Totalitarismus: Das Exilwerk Alfred Döblins and several essays and book reviews on 19th- and 20th-century German literature; co-editor of Unus Mundus: Kosmos and Sympathie, Naturphilosophie, and Philosophia Naturalis. SLC, 1989–

Current undergraduate courses

Advanced German: Modern German Literature and Film

Spring

In this course, we will explore modern German literature and culture from the end of the 19th century through the Weimar Republic. We will analyze literary texts from the pre-World War I era by such writers as Hauptmann, Thomas Mann, Döblin, Kafka, and Hermann Hesse. Another major focus of this course will lie on the literary, cinematic, and artistic expressions of the so-called “Golden Twenties” during the Weimar Republic (1918-1933). Irmgard Keun’s Berlin novel, Das Kunstseidene Mädchen, Brecht’s Three Penny Opera, and films such as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Nosferatu, and Der blaue Engel will help us understand this fascinating period that ended with Hitler’s rise to power. By means of a Nazi propaganda film, Jud Süss, we will explore the paranoid anti-Semitism of the National Socialists. This course consists of three equally important components: Students will have one seminar with Mr. Dollinger, who will discuss the class materials in German; one seminar with Ms. Mizelle, who will work with students collectively on various grammar and vocabulary issues; and one biweekly individual conference with Mr. Dollinger.

Faculty

Advanced German: Postwar German Literature and Film

Fall

In this seminar, we will focus on postwar German literature from 1945 to the present. As we read poems, plays, prose fiction, and essays by writers such as Anonyma, Borchert, Böll, Celan, Dürrenmatt, Max Frisch, Peter Weiss, Bernhard Schlink, and others, we will give special attention to the problems of: (1) social and cultural problems in Germany right after World War II, (2) how German writers have dealt with National Socialism and the Holocaust, (3) German reunification, and (4) German-Turkish issues. We will also watch films such as Mörder unter uns, one of the earliest movies in Germany after World War II; Deutschland, bleiche Mutter, a film about life in Germany during and after World War II; Das Leben der Anderen, a film about the secret police in East Germany; Gegen die Wand, a movie that explores the lives of German-Turkish citizens in Germany and in Turkey; and Walk on Water, an Israeli-German production about the legacy of the Holocaust for young Israelis and Germans. This course consists of three equally important components: Students will have one seminar with Mr. Dollinger, who will discuss the class materials with students in German; one seminar with Ms. Mizelle, who will work with students collectively on various grammar and vocabulary issues; and one biweekly individual conference with Mr. Dollinger.

Faculty

Beginning German

Year

This course concentrates on the study of grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation in order to secure the basic tools of the German language. Through grammar exercises in class, dialogues, and short compositions, students will learn the fundamental skills to speak, read, and write in German. This class will meet three times (90 minutes) per week: twice with Mr. Dollinger and once with Ms. Mizelle, who will also meet with students individually or in small groups for an extra conference. Course materials include the textbook, Neue Horizonte, along with a workbook and a graded German reader that will allow students to start reading in German after the first week. We will cover at least 12 chapters from the textbook—all of the basic grammar and vocabulary that students will need to know in order to advance to the next level. There will be short written tests at the end of each chapter. Students will also learn basic facts about Germany today.

Faculty

Intermediate German

Year

This course stresses speaking, reading, and writing German and a thorough review of German grammar. Its aim is to give students more fluency and to prepare them for a possible junior year in Germany. Readings in the fall will consist of fairy tales, short stories, poems, and three novellas by the Austrian writer Stefan Zweig. Students will give several oral presentations (on a fairy tale, on a German city, on a German artist or intellectual). In the spring semester, we will use Im Spiegel der Literatur, a collection of short stories written by some of the most famous German writers such as Thomas Mann and Bertolt Brecht. A solid grammar review, based on the book German Grammar in Review, will help students improve their speaking and writing skills. Regular conferences with Ms. Mizelle will supplement class work.

Faculty

Previous courses

18th- and 19th-Century German Literature: Classicism, Romanticism, and Beyond

Spring

In this seminar, we will study and analyze some of the most famous German texts from several literary eras: Storm and Stress, German Classicism, German Romanticism, and 19th-century German Realism. Students will be introduced to canonical plays, novels, short stories, and poems by Lessing, Schiller, Goethe, Kleist, Tieck, Eichendorff, Droste-Hülshoff, Hauptmann, and Thomas Mann. Students will examine questions of genre (e.g., What constitutes a novella?), literary era (e.g., What do we mean when we speak of a “Romantic” text?), and historical and social developments in Germany since the late 18th century. But we will also deal with with the “existential,” emotional, and philosophical conflicts that torment the literary characters that we study in these works. Students need very good reading skills for this class, which consists of three equally important components: (1) Students will have one seminar with Mr. Dollinger, who will discuss the class materials with them in German; (2) one seminar with Ms. Mizelle, who will work with students collectively on various grammar and vocabulary issues; and (3) one biweekly individual conference with Mr. Dollinger.

Faculty

Advanced German: German Literature and Film, 1900-1945

Spring

In this course, we will explore the major developments of German literature and culture from the end of the 19th century to the present. In the fall semester, we will analyze literary texts from the pre-World War I era by writers such as Hauptmann, Thomas Mann, Döblin, Kafka, and Schnitzler and discuss literary movements such as Naturalism and Expressionism. Another major focus of this course will lie on the literary, cinematic, and artistic expressions of the so-called “Golden Twenties” during the Weimar Republic (1918-1933). Brecht’s Three Penny Opera and excerpts from novels such as Feuchtwanger’s Geschwister Oppermann and films such as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Nosferatu, and Der blaue Engel will help us understand this fascinating period that ended with Hitler’s rise to power. By means of a Nazi propaganda film, Jud Süss, we will explore the paranoid anti-Semitism of the National Socialists. This course consists of three equally important components: Students will have one seminar with Mr. Dollinger, who will discuss the class materials with students in German; one seminar with Ms. Mizelle, who will work with students collectively on various grammar and vocabulary issues; and one biweekly individual conference with Mr. Dollinger.

Faculty

Contemporary German Literature and Film Since 1989

Fall

In this seminar, we will focus on Contemporary German Literature and Film since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. As we read plays, prose fiction, and essays by writers such as Sven Regener, Thomas Brussig, Ingo Schulze, Christian Kracht, Clemens Meyer, Maxim Biller, Bernhard Schlink, Judith Hermann. Doris Dörrie, and Zafer Senocak, we will give special attention to: (1) social and cultural conflicts in Germany in the wake of German reunification; (2) how German writers deal with the double burden of National Socialism and East German communism; and (3) “existential” questions facing ordinary Germans today. We will also watch several famous films—such as Am kuerzeren Ende der Sonnenallee, Das Leben der Anderen, Good-bye Lenin, and Barbara—that will introduce us both humorously and tragically into the life of Germans behind the “Iron Curtain.” This course consists of three equally important components: Students will have one seminar with Mr. Dollinger, who will discuss the class materials with them in German; one seminar with Ms. Mizelle, who will work with students collectively on various grammar and vocabulary issues; and one biweekly individual conference with Mr. Dollinger.

Faculty

Modern German Literature and Film

Fall

In this course, we will explore modern German literature and culture from the end of the 19th century through the Weimar Republic. We will analyze literary texts from the pre-World War I era by such writers as Hauptmann, Thomas Mann, Döblin, Kafka, and Hermann Hesse. Another major focus of this course will lie on the literary, cinematic, and artistic expressions of the so-called “Golden Twenties” during the Weimar Republic (1918-1933). Irmgard Keun’s Berlin novel, Das Kunstseidene Mädchen, Brecht’s Three Penny Opera, and films such as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Nosferatu, and Der blaue Engel will help us understand this fascinating period that ended with Hitler’s rise to power. By means of a Nazi propaganda film, Jud Süss, we will explore the paranoid anti-Semitism of the National Socialists. This course consists of three equally important components: Students will have one seminar with Mr. Dollinger, who will discuss the class materials in German; one seminar with Ms. Mizelle, who will work with students collectively on various grammar and vocabulary issues; and one biweekly individual conference with Mr. Dollinger.

Faculty