Summer Seminar for Writers

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Nearly seventy adult writers will convene on the beautiful Sarah Lawrence College campus for the annual Summer Seminar for Writers, June 16-21, 2019. Participants come from all over the United States and beyond to experience six amazing days of workshops, craft talks, generative sessions, and readings. Students chose to study along one of the following tracks: fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, screenwriting or mixed genre.

2019 Program Overview

Workshops

The weeklong workshops are constructive, supportive environments in which students are encouraged to take risks. Workshops are capped at twelve to ensure each student has a voice as both a reader and a writer. Each workshop has its own unique atmosphere and strategies. Some will slant toward imagining the possibilities of existing work, some toward the creation of new work, while others will aim for a balance of the two. Teachers may bring in pieces of published writing to springboard into discussions of craft, structure, style, and content. In every workshop, the writing of students will be deeply considered, and participants will receive compassionate and constructive feedback.

Mixed Genre Workshop with Jeffrey McDaniel—“Hybrids of Poetry and Prose”

One of the exciting literary developments in recent years is the plethora of work that refuses easy categorization, by authors like Maggie Nelson, Claudia Rankine, Jenny Offill, and Eula Biss. Each class will begin with a close reading of a text that blurs the lines of genre. We will consider architecture, diction, association, metaphor, and other issues of craft. For workshop, students can submit poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, or anything in between. We will aim to locate a piece’s heat—its linguistic, figurative, and musical energy—and consider how that energy might be developed, or maximized, in subsequent drafts and to what effect. Occasionally, we will do in-class writing exercises that emphasize intuition and chance and steer students towards a place of hybridity

Jeffrey McDanielJeffrey McDaniel is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Chapel of Inadvertent Joy (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2013). His other books include The Endarkenment, The Splinter Factory, The Forgiveness Parade, and Alibi School. He’s received an NEA fellowship for creative writing and been published in many journals and anthologies, including Ploughshares, Field, American Poetry Review, and Best American Poetry 1994 and 2010. He teaches at Sarah Lawrence College.

Screenwriting Workshop with Sarah Koskoff

Bastard child of an unlikely love triangle between play, novel, and poem, a screenwriter has to drop in and out of multiple literary forms while being respected by none of them, not even their own. In this workshop, we will attempt to carve out a dignified space for the screenwriter (however temporary) by looking closely at produced screenplays that work on the page as well as the screen. We will do some in-class writing to access unconscious images, language, and scenes, and explore ways to grow these fragments into descriptive settings, connected dialogue, fully-realized characters, and expansive narratives. Students may bring scripts of any length to work on, from features to pilots to web-length shorts. You’ll leave with a head of steam to write and make films, unconcerned with your place in the literary world.

Sarah KoskoffSarah Koskoff wrote the screenplay for Hello I Must Be Going, which was the opening night film of the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. The film was honored by the National Board of Review as one of the Ten Best Independent Films of 2012, and her screenplay won Showtime's Tony Cox Award for Screenwriting at the Nantucket Film Festival. She has worked as a script consultant on feature films such as Love, Liza, starring Philip Seymour Hoffman and Kathy Bates, and Macbeth, starring Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard. She has many scripts currently in development, including a television adaptation of Elizabeth Hand’s crime novel series, Generation Loss. Koskoff was a 2009 Sundance Screenwriters Lab Fellow and is an ongoing advisor for the Sundance Screenwriting Intensive in Los Angeles. Prior to writing for the screen, she wrote plays and worked extensively as an actor in film, television, and theater. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two children.

Poetry Workshop with Erika Meitner

Erika MeitnerErika Meitner is the winner of the 2018 National Jewish Book Award for Poetry and author of five books of poems: Holy Moly Carry Me, Inventory at the All-Night Drugstore, Makeshift Instructions for Vigilant Girls, Ideal Cities, which was a 2009 National Poetry series winner, and Copia. Her poetry and prose have been widely anthologized. Born and raised in Queens and Long Island, NY, Meitner is a first-generation American: her father is from Israel, her mother was born in a refugee camp in Germany, which is where her maternal grandparents settled after surviving the Holocaust. Meitner is currently an associate professor of English at Virginia Tech, where she directs the MFA and undergraduate programs in Creative Writing.

Poetry Workshop with Paisley Rekdal

Paisley RekdalPaisley Rekdal was born and raised in Seattle, Washington. She is the author of a book of essays, The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee, the hybrid photo-text memoir, Intimate, and five books of poetry: A Crash of Rhinos, Six Girls Without Pants, The Invention of the Kaleidoscope, Animal Eye, a finalist for the 2013 Kingsley Tufts Prize and winner of the UNT Rilke Prize, and Imaginary Vessels, finalist for the 2018 Kingsley Tufts Prize and the Washington State Book Award. Her newest work of nonfiction is a book-length essay, The Broken Country: On Trauma, a Crime, and the Continuing Legacy of Vietnam. A new collection of poems, Nightingale, which re-writes many of the myths in Ovid's The Metamorphoses, will be published spring 2019.

Her work has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Fellowship, a Fulbright Fellowship, a Civitella Ranieri Residency, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, Pushcart Prizes (2009, 2013), the AWP Creative Nonfiction Prize, and various state arts council awards. Her poems and essays have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, American Poetry Review, The Kenyon Review, Poetry, The New Republic, Tin House, the Best American Poetry series (2012, 2013, 2017, and 2018), and on National Public Radio, among others. She teaches at the University of Utah, where she is also the creator and editor of the community web project Mapping Salt Lake City. In May 2017, she was named Utah's Poet Laureate.

Conferences & Generative Sessions

In addition to working with a writing teacher in class, each summer seminar student will have a 30-minute one-on-one conference with their teacher, a chance to deepen their dialogue about individual writing.

On weekday afternoons, there will be space for participants to gather and engage in a multi-genre writing exercise, directed by a teacher or visiting writer. This exposes students to different approaches and will be a space to cross-pollinate genres and to roll the creative dice.

Craft Talks & Readings

Each weekday afternoon, there will be two craft talks open to all participants in the Summer Seminar. Students are encouraged to attend and hear faculty and visiting writers explore various topics. Some of these talks will be more like traditional lectures, some will be more illustrative discussions, some will be in-depth interviews. All will deepen student’s sense of the literary tradition and new ways of thinking about the art of writing.

In addition, every evening will feature a dynamic reading with two talented and acclaimed authors. To foster a dance and dialogue between genres, each reading will pair a prose writer and a poet.

2019 Visiting Writers

  • Kenneth Carroll
  • Terrance Hayes
  • Edward Hirsch
  • Emily Raboteau
  • Joan Silber