Events

February 2020

Thursday 27 Feb

Julie Abraham: Working Paper (Gallery Exhibition)

Barbara Walters Gallery

Open to the public

J.L. Abraham works by hand (printing and painting), works on paper (French sheets, Japanese rolls, machine made in America), and works through aggregation (of blocks, colors, methods, sheets). Though she often multiplies, she rarely duplicates.

Aracelis Girmay Poetry Reading

Slonim Living Room / Stone Room

Open to the public

/ Thursday

6:00pm-7:00pm

Aracelis Girmay holds a BA from Connecticut College and an MFA from New York University. She is the author of Teeth, Kingdom Animalia, and The Black Maria.

Women’s Rights, Equity, and Representation in the Fine Arts (Women's History Colloquium)

Wrexham Living Room

Open to the public

/ Thursday

6:00pm-8:00pm

Released in 1972, Gerda Lerner edited Black Women in White America: A Documentary History, which chronicles 350 years of Black women's contributions to history, despite centuries of being enslaved and treated as property. It was one of the first books to detail the contributions of Black women in history. Revisiting this pioneering book, Tiffany LaTrice will discuss new methodologies to uncover, document, and write about Black women’s historical contributions and outline how she has leveraged her Women's History degree to champion stories, create programs and national movements around women's rights, equity, and representation in the fine art industry.

March 2020

Monday 2 Mar

What It Is: Race, Family, and One Thinking Black Man's Blues with Clifford Thompson (E Pluribus Unum Series)

Barbara Walters Campus Center Room B

Open to the public

/ Monday

7:00pm-9:00pm

Essayist and creative nonfiction writer Clifford Thompson has taught writing at Sarah Lawrence College since 2016. Hist latest book, What It Is: Race, Family, and One Thinking Black Man's Blues, was released in November 2019, and forms the basis for this evening's discussion.

Tuesday 3 Mar

Artist Lecture: Sarah Peters

Heimbold Visual Arts Center 208

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

1:30pm-3:00pm

Dead Poets Slam

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

1:30pm-3:00pm

Billy Lester: An Afternoon of Improvised Solo Piano

Performing Arts Center Reisinger Auditorium

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

1:30pm-3:00pm

“Lester is a ‘musician’s musician’ and the kind of piano player that jazz fans love to discover: a quietly brilliant mind that has been building his own unique voice and sound for decades, just barely outside the jazz spotlight...Lester’s playing is gentle and probing, yet solid enough to carry strong melodic lines. It’s subtly transportive. Listening to it, you’ll find yourself getting swept away without even realizing you’re moving.” from Brian Zimmerman, JAZZIZ.

Thursday 5 Mar

Dangerous “Passing”: Addie Hunton and Black Women’s Fight Against Disfranchisement in 1920s Virginia (Women's History Colloquium)

Slonim Living Room / Stone Room

Open to the public

/ Thursday

6:00pm-8:00pm

In late October 1920, investigator Addie Hunton “hurr[ied] along” her report to NAACP chair Mary White Ovington. With only days to go before the November presidential election, there was no time to spare. The Nineteenth Amendment was now on the books, but registrars in Norfolk, Virginia were refusing Black women who tried to register to vote. These women feared white reprisals if they challenged the officials, yet they freely told their stories of rejection and humiliation to Hunton, an NAACP representative who had traveled in from New York and who spent less than 48 hours in town. Why did they share such dangerous stories with a total stranger? Liette Gidlow unwinds this mystery by delving deep into the archives to explore the many ways African American women in the Jim Crow South fought for voting rights after the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified. Her research finds that while a great many southern Black women were indeed disfranchised, a surprising number in fact succeeded in voting, and their successes, together with ceaseless agitation by those who remained disfranchised, transformed American politics for the next hundred years and ultimately helped elect Barack Obama, the nation’s first African American president.

Friday 6 Mar

Dance Performances Spring 2020

Performing Arts Center Bessie Schonberg Dance Studio

Open to the public

/ Friday

7:30pm-9:00pm

2020 Brendan Gill Lecture featuring Jill Lepore (E Pluribus Unum Event Series)

Performing Arts Center Reisinger Auditorium

Open to the public

/ Friday

8:00pm-10:00pm

Jill Lepore is a staff writer for The New Yorker, a Harvard University professor, and the author of the bestselling book These Truths: A History of the United States.

Saturday 7 Mar

Dance Performances Spring 2020

Performing Arts Center Bessie Schonberg Dance Studio

Open to the public

/ Saturday

7:30pm-9:00pm

Tuesday 10 Mar

Screening and Discussion of Margarethe von Trotta’s Hannah Arendt (E Pluribus Unum Event Series)

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

6:00pm-10:00pm

A screening of Margarethe von Trotta’s biographical film Hannah Arendt (2012), whose subject is one of the most important political theorists and public intellectuals of the second half of the 20th century. Following the screening, the film’s screenwriter, Pamela Katz, and star, Barbara Sukowa, will participate in a lively panel discussion with Sarah Lawrence faculty members.

Wednesday 11 Mar

Environmental Studies/Science Technology & Society Lecture Series: Heather Davis

Barbara Walters Campus Center Room C

Open to the public

/ Wednesday

5:00pm-6:30pm

Thursday 12 Mar

The Writing Institute Presents: Published Student Reading

Barbara Walters Campus Center Room B

Open to the public

/ Thursday

6:30pm-8:30pm

Monday 23 Mar

Gallery Exhibitions 2019-2020: Gary Burnley "Facing History"

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Heimbold Gallery

Open to the public

/ Monday

10:00am-4:00pm

Tuesday 24 Mar

Music Tuesdays: Martin Goldray, organ

Marshall Field Room 1

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

1:30pm-3:00pm

Thursday 26 Mar

Myla Goldberg on the Craft of Writing – How to Use Fact and History in Your Writing Without it Totally Killing You

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Thursday

2:00pm-3:00pm

Depending on who you are, research can be intimidating or addictive, or some unholy combination of the two. But all of us, no matter what we write, work with facts and history at least some of the time. Don't fret: there are a slew of ways (old and new) to find out what you need to know, and some tried and true methods to approach how to work with what you find. Together we'll discuss how to track down info of all kinds, how to enter into the past, and how to know when research is your friend, and when it's your foe.

Read more about Myla Goldberg on her faculty profile.

Saturday 28 Mar

The 22nd Annual Conference in Women's History

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Saturday

10:00am-11:45am

The 22nd Annual Conference in Women's History

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Saturday

1:00pm-6:00pm

The 22nd Annual Conference in Women's History

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Atrium/Lobby

Open to the public

/ Saturday

6:00pm-7:00pm

Tuesday 31 Mar

Music Tuesdays: Iraqi Maqqam Ensemble

Performing Arts Center Reisinger Auditorium

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

1:30pm-3:00pm

Gary Burnley: "Facing History" (Visual and Studio Arts Lecture Series)

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Heimbold Gallery

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

1:30pm-3:00pm

April 2020

Wednesday 1 Apr

Angela Palm on the Craft of Nonfiction—Memory and Research in Narrative Nonfiction: A Synergic Relationship

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Wednesday

2:00pm-3:00pm

As writers of narrative nonfiction we have at our disposal the entire world of our personal experiences, and in this modern era of this modern world, we have at our fingertips all the known information on any subject that captures our attention. In this way, narrative nonfiction is really a process of editing. Of listening for the piccolo’s notes among an orchestra of several dozen instruments sounding at once. Or of creating a manufactured scarcity from an abundance, and vice versa. It is a process of curating our vast lives and our vaster access to knowledge to convey truths in a meaningful and memorable way. This talk examines the magic that happens in the interstices of skillfully blended memory and research.

Thursday 2 Apr

Longfellow Lecture: Areitta Slade '73, Ph.D.

Barbara Walters Campus Center Room B

Open to the public

/ Thursday

5:30pm-7:00pm

This year's Longfellow Lecture, delivered by Arietta Slade ’73, Ph.D., will address ways that practitioners, educators, and communities can support parents in developing solid foundations to provide a safe and secure environment in which their children can flourish.

 

Amber Sparks Speculative Fiction Reading

Slonim Living Room / Stone Room

Open to the public

/ Thursday

6:00pm-7:00pm

Amber Sparks is the author of The Unfinished World and Other Stories and I Do Not Forgive You: Revenges and Other Stories, both from Liveright. Her fiction and essays have appeared in Tin House, Granta, The Cut, The Paris Review, and others.

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