Events

March 2018

Thursday 1 Mar

Red Umbrella Rights Film Screening and Q&A with Director Molly Merryman​

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Screening Room

Open to the public

/ Thursday

4:00pm-5:50pm

Red Umbrella Rights is a film about sex worker rights that focuses on founders of the International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers and members of Bay Area Sex Worker Outreach Project (SWOP). This film uses the annual International Day to End Violence event to explore issues of sex workers’ rights, LGBTQ rights, and the targeting of sex workers in violent attacks. Featured in the documentary are significant LGBTQ and sex-positive activists including Carol Queen, Annie Sprinkle, and Carol Leigh (aka Scarlot Harlot), who famously coined the term “sex work.”

Friday 2 Mar

SSSF Live Auction

Performing Arts Center Reisinger Auditorium

Open to the public

/ Friday

12:30pm-2:30pm

The Students for Students Scholarships Fund (SSSF) Annual Live Auction is the longest running student-run auction in the country. All the proceeds will go directly to SSSF, which means more financial aid for students.

Saturday 3 Mar

The Inaugural Year: 20th Annual Women's History Conference: Democracy on the Margins: Gender, Citizenship, and the Global Challenge to Democratic Freedoms

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Saturday

8:30am-5:00pm

Events in the past decade seem to indicate that democracy in many parts of the world is in peril. In the United States, voter ID laws and extra legal tactics work to suppress voter turnout and political actors make decisions based on what might effect their re-election rather than what is best for their country. American distrust of government, and a growing sense of white resentment have widened divisions among an already fractured electorate, while racism and xenophobia seem to be growing. Moreover, Russian hackers appear to have weaponized racism in a way that affected the outcome of the US elections.

Monday 5 Mar

Brain Awareness Week: What we think, we become: A neuroscientist’s understanding: a lecture by Dr. Andre Fenton

Titsworth Marjorie Leff Miller ’53 Lecture Hall

Open to the public

/ Monday

12:00pm-1:30pm

Memories are the imprints that experience leaves in the brain in defining knowledge, mental competence, and, in part, our individuality. In this lecture, Dr. Fenton will explain the biological basis of how experience alters brain function-breakthroughs that will eventually have a remarkable impact on our lives. 

Dr. Andre Fenton is a professor of Neural Science at New York University. He studies how brains store experiences as memories, and how the expression of knowledge activates information that is relevant without activating what is irrelevant. Dr. Fenton and colleagues identified PKMzeta as the first molecule that maintains the persistence of memories in the brain, a discovery recognized by Science Magazine as one of the 10 most important breakthroughs in all of science and technology published in 2006. André founded Bio-Signal Group Corp., which developed and commercialized an FDA-approved portable, wireless, and easy to use platform for obtaining medical quality EEGs for emergency medicine, sports, space exploration, and under served clinics in Africa.

Talk with Photographer Glen McClure

Library Electronic Classroom 2 ML102

Open to the public

/ Monday

5:30pm-6:30pm

Photographer and artist Glen McClure will give a talk about his current show featuring 14 portraits of shipyard workers. Exhibit runs from February 1-March 7.

Tuesday 6 Mar

Brain Awareness Week: Jessica Cloud ’18 Lecture—Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) at Sarah Lawrence College: An Introduction to Student-Accessible fMRI Techniques and Methodologies

Science Center 103

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

12:30pm-1:30pm

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is an essential methodology in the field of psychology and neurobiology, allowing researchers to visualize distinct neural correlates of behaviors and the ways in which neuronal networks interact during tasks. For undergraduates, however, this technology is often inaccessible, both in terms of understanding the techniques behind fMRI imaging and in utilizing fMRI images for research. Efforts of research groups across the country have helped to rectify this lack of access through online databases of fMRI images; access to these images allows for countless research opportunities in the areas of anxiety, epilepsy, vision loss, dementia/Alzheimer’s, adolescent/adult depression and anxiety, and others. Jessica Cloud ’18 will review ways in which undergraduates and other researchers without access to fMRI machinery can perform research using fMRI images and discuss ongoing cognition research at Sarah Lawrence College that utilizes these techniques.

Translation Series Workshop with Katrina Dodson

Library Meeting Room aka Pillow Room

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

3:30pm-5:00pm

Katrina Dodson Lecture—Channeling Clarice Lispector: Translation as a Faithful Performance (Babel Translation Series)

Library Meeting Room aka Pillow Room

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

5:30pm-7:00pm

Katrina Dodson is the translator from the Portuguese of The Complete Stories by Clarice Lispector (New Directions, 2015), winner of the 2016 PEN Translation Prize, the American Translators Association Lewis Galantière Prize, and a Northern California Book Award. She is currently adapting her Lispector translation journal into a book and translating the 1928 Brazilian modernist classic, Macunaíma, the Hero Without a Character, by Mário de Andrade (New Directions, 2019). Dodson recently edited a new translation of Ana Cristina Cesar’s poetry collection A teus pés by Brenda Hillman with Helen Hillman and Sebastião Macedo (Parlor Press, 2018). She holds a PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Berkeley, with a dissertation on Elizabeth Bishop in Brazil and a Designated Emphasis in Women, Gender & Sexuality. Dodson has taught Comparative Literature and Portuguese at UC Berkeley. She was also a mentor at the Mills College MFA in Translation Program and on the faculty of the Bard College Language & Thinking Program. She has spent over four years in Brazil, first as an English teacher in 2003 and later as a Fulbright scholar. Dodson was born in San Francisco to a Vietnamese mother and American father and now lives in New York.

The Inaugural Year: Visual Arts Lecture Series—Martha Rosler

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

5:30pm-7:00pm

Martha Rosler, multimedia artist and writer, will give a lecture about her work in conjunction with the Inaugural Year theme of Democracy and Education. Following the lecture, a group of students from various disciplines will interview Rosler about her life and work. Visual Arts students will then work with Rosler to design and publish a small edition of this interview along with curated images of her work.

Wednesday 7 Mar

Theatre Program Presents: Big Love

Performing Arts Center Suzanne Werner Wright Theatre

Open to the public

/ Wednesday

7:00pm-9:00pm

Fifty sisters seek refuge in Italy after escaping marriage to their fifty cousins in Greece. Big Love explores and explodes ideas about love, gender politics, societal pressures, and the responsibilities we all hold as global citizens. A Guest Artist Production. Created by Chuck Mee; Guest Artist Director Colette Robert; Assistant Director Kelsi Parsons.

Thursday 8 Mar

The Inaugural Year: Starving the Beast—Steve Mims (Art of Teaching Film Series)

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Thursday

5:00pm-7:00pm

This documentary exposes the adverse effects of systematic defunding and business philosophy on public higher education. The film reveals an historic philosophical shift that reframes public higher education as a ‘value proposition’ to be borne by the student as a consumer, rather than an investment in citizens as a ‘public good.’ Financial winners and losers emerge in a struggle poised to profoundly change public higher education.

Alive Inside: A Story of Music and Memory Film Screening and Q&A with Dr. Connie Tomaino

Library Meeting Room aka Pillow Room

Open to the public

/ Thursday

5:00pm-7:30pm

A screening of Alive Inside: A Story of Music and Memory, which examines the effect of music on therapy for patients with memory disorders. After the screening, there will be a Q&A with Dr. Connie Tomaino, who was integral to the original music therapy program.

An Evening with Alexis Taines Coe MA ’09 (Women’s History Colloquium)

Slonim Living Room / Stone Room

Open to the public

/ Thursday

6:00pm-8:00pm

Alexis Taines Coe MA ’09 wrote the narrative history book, Alice+Freda Forever, and is a consultant on the movie adaptation. Her second book, a biography on George Washington, will be published by Viking (Penguin/Random House) in 2019. Alexis is also a consultant for Lena Dunham's forthcoming HBO project, the in-house-historian at The Wing, where she delivers a monthly lecture on women's history, and co-hosted the Audible series, “Presidents Are People, Too!” She has contributed to The New Yorker, The New York Times' opinion section, The New York Times Magazine, The New Republic, The Paris Review, Elle, and many others. In 2017 and 2016, Alexis' work was included in The Best American Essays and The Best American Travel Essays, and in 2013, her essay on how marriage helps male professors get ahead was one of The Atlantic's Great Debates of the Year. She has appeared on and contributed to the History Channel, NPR, CNN, C-SPAN, and many others.

Theatre Program Presents: Big Love

Performing Arts Center Suzanne Werner Wright Theatre

Open to the public

/ Thursday

7:00pm-9:00pm

Fifty sisters seek refuge in Italy after escaping marriage to their fifty cousins in Greece. Big Love explores and explodes ideas about love, gender politics, societal pressures, and the responsibilities we all hold as global citizens. A Guest Artist Production. Created by Chuck Mee; Guest Artist Director Colette Robert; Assistant Director Kelsi Parsons.

Friday 9 Mar

Theatre Program Presents: Big Love

Performing Arts Center Suzanne Werner Wright Theatre

Open to the public

/ Friday

7:00pm-9:00pm

Fifty sisters seek refuge in Italy after escaping marriage to their fifty cousins in Greece. Big Love explores and explodes ideas about love, gender politics, societal pressures, and the responsibilities we all hold as global citizens. A Guest Artist Production. Created by Chuck Mee; Guest Artist Director Colette Robert; Assistant Director Kelsi Parsons.

Saturday 24 Mar

Women’s Softball vs. Mount Saint Mary

Campbell Sports Center Mary LeVine Softball Field

Open to the public

/ Saturday

12:00pm-4:00pm

Tuesday 27 Mar

Chloe Wang Lecture—Finding a Home on the River: Embracing a Place-based Environmental Ethos (Intersections Colloquium)

Titsworth Marjorie Leff Miller ’53 Lecture Hall

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

6:00pm-7:30pm

A recent Haverford College graduate reflects on her work in Southwest Philadelphia, facilitating engagement with the local environment—of neighborhood residents with the river garden in their backyard, and of college students with people and places beyond the edges of their campus.

Theatre Program Presents: Big Love

Performing Arts Center Suzanne Werner Wright Theatre

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

7:00pm-9:00pm

Fifty sisters seek refuge in Italy after escaping marriage to their fifty cousins in Greece. Big Love explores and explodes ideas about love, gender politics, societal pressures, and the responsibilities we all hold as global citizens. A Guest Artist Production. Created by Chuck Mee; Guest Artist Director Colette Robert; Assistant Director Kelsi Parsons.

Wednesday 28 Mar

Men’s Tennis vs. Farmingdale State

Campbell Sports Center Tennis Courts - ALL

Open to the public

/ Wednesday

6:00pm-9:00pm

Thursday 29 Mar

The Inaugural Year: Education and Democracy/Education and Access Panel

Heimbold Visual Arts Center Donnelley Film Theatre

Open to the public

/ Thursday

5:15pm-6:45pm

A panel discussion featuring:

Graduate Studies Information Session—New York City

Off Campus The 23rd Street Center: 116 W 23rd St (5th floor)

Open to the public

/ Thursday

6:00pm-7:30pm

Please join us for an Information Session to learn more about our graduate programs and life as a graduate student at Sarah Lawrence College.

Spring Open Dance Performance

Performing Arts Center Bessie Schonberg Dance Studio

Open to the public

/ Thursday

7:30pm-9:00pm

Reserve your seat(s) by signing up at the PAC Dance bulletin board or e-mailing Carmen Hartigan at chartigan@sarahlawrence.edu.

Saturday 31 Mar

Men’s Volleyball vs. St. Joseph’s (Brooklyn) and St. Joseph’s (L.I.)

Campbell Sports Center Full Gym

Open to the public

/ Saturday

11:00am-5:00pm

April 2018

Tuesday 3 Apr

Science Seminar Series—Mathematics Faculty Member Nick Rauh

Science Center 103

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

12:30pm-1:30pm

A seminar given by mathematics faculty member Nick Rauh.

The Inaugural Year: Nell Minow ’74 Lecture—Why Only Corporate Governance Can Save the World (Economics Lecture Series)

Titsworth Marjorie Leff Miller ’53 Lecture Hall

Open to the public

/ Tuesday

1:30pm-3:00pm

The Trump administration’s regulatory rollback has taken Americans through the Looking Glass and into the Upside Down. The question of what used to be called “corporate social responsibility” in the peace-and-love 60’s has been sharpened by the upheavals of the Enron era, the financial meltdown, and Occupy Wall Street. That means the shareholder movement that began with individuals holding dozens of shares of stock submitting granola-crunching shareholder proposals about Vietnam and South Africa have been replaced by pension funds and other institutional investors with millions of shares of stock and a tough, number-crunching demands about sustainable operations, climate change, political contributions, and cyber-security. Nell Minow ’74 will talk about her own fights with overpaid, under-performing CEOs, why divesting “bad” stocks never works, and how investors can sometimes be more effective in making society cleaner, smarter, and fairer than government can.

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