Sasha Welsh

Undergraduate Discipline

Dance

Graduate Program

MFA Dance Program

BA, Swarthmore College. MFA, Temple University. PDDS, Laban Centre, London. Choreographer whose work explores states of awareness, the potential of memory and imagination, and the limitations and possibilities of the human body. Her choreography has been seen in venues such as Movement Research at Judson Church, Dance Conversations at the Flea, Dixon Place, AUNTS, Performance Mix at Joyce Soho, INOVA galleries (University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee), Philadelphia Live Arts Festival (City Paper Pick of the Fringe in 2004), RAW Material at Dance New Amsterdam, and Studio 303 in Montreal. Her company, Victory to Others, presented its first full-length concert at Triskelion Arts in March 2009. Performed with Laurie Berg and Megan Byrne, Noriko Kato (Japan), Alison D’Amato, Darla Stanley, Merián Soto, George Alley, and many others. Curated performances in New York since 2006, running an experimental venue called Ulla’s House, which has supported the work of more than 50 diverse artists at all stages of their careers. Taught dance at DeSales University and Temple University. Maintains a private practice teaching Pilates and dance conditioning and is a long-term student of anatomist Irene Dowd. SLC 2015–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Dance

Dance Practice Conference

Component

Students taking Dance Thirds will meet with the instructor for this component course at least once per semester to address individual dance training issues and questions and to identify short- and long-term goals. Guided by discussion, we will develop practical strategies to address issues and questions in the context of achieving goals by means of specific supplemental exercises that address strength, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness, coordination, and effective approaches to learning. This course is designed to support and enhance students’ work in dance classes, rehearsals, and performances.

Faculty

Anatomy in Action

Component—Year

Students who wish to join this yearlong class in the second semester may do so only with the permission of the instructor.

How is it possible for humans to move in the multitude of ways that we do? Learn to develop your X-ray vision of human beings in motion through functional anatomical study that combines movement practice, drawing, lecture, and problem solving. In this course, movement is a powerful vehicle for experiencing in detail our profoundly adaptable musculoskeletal anatomy. Facilitating our study of the entire musculoskeletal system, we will learn Irene Dowd’s Spirals™, a comprehensive warm-up/cool-down for dancing that coordinates all joints and muscles through their fullest range of motion. In addition to movement practice, drawings will be part of each week’s lecture. (Drawing materials will be provided.) Insights and skills developed in this course can provide tremendous inspiration in the process of movement invention and composition.

Faculty

Graduate Courses

Dance 2017-2018

Anatomy in Action

Component—Year

The course will be taught by Ms. Gould in the fall and Ms. Welsh in the spring. Students who wish to join this yearlong class in the second semester may do so only with the permission of the instructor.

How is it possible for humans to move in the multitude of ways that we do? Learn to develop your X-ray vision of human beings in motion through functional anatomical study that combines movement practice, drawing, lecture, and problem solving. In this course, movement is a powerful vehicle for experiencing in detail our profoundly adaptable musculoskeletal anatomy. Facilitating our study of the entire musculoskeletal system, we will learn Irene Dowd’s Spirals™, a comprehensive warm-up/cool-down for dancing that coordinates all joints and muscles through their fullest range of motion. In addition to movement practice, drawings will be part of each week’s lecture. (Drawing materials will be provided.) Insights and skills developed in this course can provide tremendous inspiration in the process of movement invention and composition.

Faculty

Previous Courses

Dance Training Conference

Component—Year

Students taking Contemporary Practice I, II, and III will meet with the instructor for this component course at least once per semester to address individual dance training issues and questions and to identify short- and long-term goals. Guided by discussion, we will develop practical strategies to address issues and questions in the context of achieving goals by means of specific supplemental exercises that address strength, flexibility, kinesthetic awareness, coordination, and effective approaches to learning. This course is designed to support and enhance students’ work in dance classes, rehearsals, and performances.

Faculty