Alma Watkins

BA, Morgan State University. EdM, MA, Columbia University–Teachers College. Licensed mental health counselor; certified alcohol and substance abuse counselor; studied many forms of dance—including tap, ballet, jazz, contemporary, and African—and has almost 20 years of clinical experience working with various populations, including survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, substance abuse, and children in foster care and their families. SLC, 2016–

Graduate Courses

Dance/Movement Therapy 2017-2018

Clinical Treatment Planning

Graduate Seminar—Fall

In this course, students will build on concepts learned in Graduate Seminar in Methods and Theory of DMT I and II, Human Growth, Psychopathology, and Movement Observation I and II to refine their assessment skills in developing treatment plans consistent with DSM-5 criteria and the application of dance/movement therapy principles and interventions. The role of pharmacotherapy will be included. We will also examine clinical and treatment planning, with a focus on developing clinical writing skills as they relate to specific settings and populations, including children, adolescents, adults, and geriatrics.

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Group Work Theory and Practice I

Graduate Seminar—Fall

In this course, students will learn clinical skills and roles needed for the effective practice of group work as dance/movement therapists in varied clinical settings. We will examine theoretical constructs of group work that include Yalom’s Interpersonal approach, Shulman’s Interactional approach, Falck’s Membership Perspective and Steinberg’s model of Mutual-Aid. Students will be expected to identify the central ideas and methods of group work and recognize its emotional, cognitive and behavioral applications as well as behavior that disrupts the work of group process, demonstrate an understanding of the effects of transference and countertransference, discuss group work theory and techniques used to facilitate problem-solving and specific skill building to reduce psychiatric symptoms, and group characteristics including multiculturalism, diversity, dynamics, and stages of development and interventions.

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Group Work Theory and Practice II

Graduate Seminar—Spring

In this course, students will expand their knowledge of the basic theories, methods, concepts and clinical applications learned in Group Work I. We will explore the core elements of systems approaches to group work theory and DMT clinical practice. Specifically, we will examine the contributions of Monica McGoldrick's influential work concerning ethno-cultural aspects affecting families, including the impact of race, class, religion, historical factors and migration experiences; and attitudes about sexual orientation and intermarriage. Other theoretical models will include the relational-cultural paradigm developed at the Stone Center's Jean Baker Miller Training Institute and the principles of Resilience Theory that emerged from the research of Dr. Emmy Werner. These models have implications for the development of therapeutic interventions and will inform our study of the clinical roles and skills needed for the effective practice of DMT group work with children, adolescents, and families in various clinical settings.

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Professional Orientation and Ethics

Graduate Seminar—Spring

Students will learn the fundamental tenets underlying professional ethics and ethical decision-making in the practice of dance/movement therapy. We will identify and explore ethical concepts, standards, and guidelines that will inform your clinical judgment, and become aware and mindful of the ways your personal ethics relate to your role as a professional DMT. In addition to course readings, we will study the ADTA Code of Ethics and Standards of Ethical Practice, and the New York State Education Department requirements for standards of licensure in Creative Arts Therapy, including training in the identification and reporting of child abuse and maltreatment.

Faculty