Rose Anne Thom

on leave spring semester

BA, McGill University. Labanotator and reconstructor; writer, critic for Dance Magazine, Collier’s Encyclopedia, and Society of Dance History Scholars; oral historian for the Dance Collection at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and the School of American Ballet; consultant, New York State Council on the Arts Dance Program; guest faculty, Princeton University, 2003; former teacher at State University of New York-Purchase, Southern Methodist University, American Ballet Theatre School. SLC, 1975–

Course Information

Current undergraduate courses

Dance History

Year

This is a course in the history of performance in the United States from the early 20th century to the present, as exemplified by the dancers, choreographers, and teachers who brought about notable changes in the art. The relationship of dance to the larger cultural environment will be discussed, with emphasis placed on the dance of our time. This course is designed to help the student relate his or her own work to the development of the art and to encourage creative critical perception.

Faculty

Labanotation/Repertory

Fall

This course will cover elementary and intermediate levels of Laban’s system of movement notation. Students will concentrate on correct observation and analysis of movement, writing facility, and the ability to read and perform authentic, historical dance forms. Reconstruction and performance of a notated work from the modern dance or ballet repertoire will be the culmination of the students’ work.

Faculty

Teaching Conference

Fall

This course is an inquiry into the ways in which dance might be taught in various settings to different populations. The detailed study of kinesthetic, verbal, and creative factors in teaching will be presented and analyzed in terms of teaching objectives. Students will be placed as practice teachers, under supervision, in dance classes on campus and in community schools.

Faculty

Current graduate courses

Dance History

Year

This is a course in the history of performance in the United States from the early 20th century to the present, as exemplified by the dancers, choreographers, and teachers who brought about notable changes in the art. The relationship of dance to the larger cultural environment will be discussed, with emphasis placed on the dance of our time. The spring term will also include studio practice. This course is designed to help the student relate his or her own work to the development of the art and to encourage creative critical perception.

Faculty

Graduate Seminar I

Fall

Writing about dance performance will be the topic for Fall 2014. This will involve reading past and present criticism as well as writing about current performances in New York City. This seminar provides an opportunity for students to develop their research, writing and analytical skills while studying a variety of topics that are of interest to them. Recent subjects have included investigations of the creative process, dance criticism, world dance forms, and the collaborative process. Each project culminates in an oral presentation.

Faculty

Labanotation/Repertory

Fall

This course will cover elementary and intermediate levels of Laban’s system of movement notation.  Students will concentrate on correct observation and analysis of movement, writing facility, and the ability to read and perform authentic, historical dance forms.  Reconstruction and performance of a notated work from the modern dance or ballet repertoire will be the culmination of the students’ work.

Faculty

Teaching Conference

Fall

This course is an inquiry into the ways in which dance might be taught in various settings to different populations. The detailed study of kinesthetic, verbal, and creative actors in teaching will be presented and analyzed in terms of teaching objectives. Students will be placed as practice teachers, under supervision, in dance classes on campus and in community schools.

Faculty

Previous courses

Dance History - Graduate

Year

This is a course in the history of performance in the United States from the early 20th century to the present, as exemplified by the dancers, choreographers, and teachers who brought about notable changes in the art. The relationship of dance to the larger cultural environment will be discussed, with emphasis placed on the dance of our time. This course is designed to help the student relate his or her own work to the development of the art and to encourage creative critical perception.

Faculty

Labanotation/Repertory - Graduate

Fall

This course will cover elementary and intermediate levels of Laban’s system of movement notation. Students will concentrate on correct observation and analysis of movement, writing facility, and the ability to read and perform authentic historical dance forms. Reconstruction and performance of a notated work from the modern dance or ballet repertoire will be the culmination of students’ work.

Faculty