Michael Spano

on leave spring semester

BA, Queens College. MFA Yale University. Solo and group shows at the Museum of Modern Art, Fogg Art Museum, Cleveland Museum of Art, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum of Art, and National Portrait Gallery. Works represented in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, St. Louis Art Museum, Baltimore Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Art in Boston, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Princeton Museum of Art, Art Institute of Chicago, and Museum of Modern Art in New York. Recipient of grants and fellowships from New York Foundation for the Arts, Camera Works, CAPS, Art Matters, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Author of Time Frames: City Pictures and Auto Portraits. SLC, 1999–

Course Information

Current undergraduate courses

Basic Analog Black-and-White Photography

Fall

This is an analog, film-based course that introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography: acquisition of photographic technique, development of personal vision and artistic expression, and discussion of photographic history and contemporary practice. Reviews are designed to strengthen the understanding of the creative process, while assignments will stress photographic aesthetics and formal concerns. Conference work entails research into historical movements and individual artists' working methods. Throughout the semester, students are encouraged to make frequent visits to gallery and museum exhibitions and share their impressions with the class. The relationship of photography to liberal arts also will be emphasized. Students will develop and complete their own bodies of work as culmination of their study. This is not a digital photography course. Students need to have at least a 35mm film camera and be able to purchase film and gelatin silver paper throughout the term.

Faculty

Previous courses

First-Year Studies: Basic Analog Black-and-White Photography

This analog film-based course introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography: acquisition of photographic technique, development of personal vision, and discussion of photographic history and contemporary practice. Reviews are designed to strengthen the understanding of the creative process, while assignments will stress photographic aesthetics and formal concerns. Conference work entails research into historical movements and individual artists’ working methods through slide presentations. Throughout the year, students are encouraged to make frequent visits to gallery and museum exhibitions and to share their impressions with the class. The relationship of photography to liberal arts also will be emphasized. Students will develop and complete their own bodies of work as culmination of their study. This is not a digital photography course. Students must have a 35mm film or medium-format film camera and be able to purchase film and gelatin silver paper throughout the year.

Faculty