Judith P. Serafini-Sauli

BA, Sarah Lawrence College; PhD, Johns Hopkins University. Special interest in 14th- and 20th-century Italian literature. Publications include: Ameto by Giovanni Boccaccio, translation; Giovanni Boccaccio, Twayne World Authors series; Clizia a Sarah Lawrence, Studi italiani; The Pleasures of Reading: Boccaccio’s Decameron and Female Literacy, MLN. Recipient of a Fulbright fellowship, Lipkin Award for Excellence in Teaching (SLC), and Esther Raushenbush Chair in the Humanities (SLC). SLC, 1981–

Current undergraduate courses

Advanced Italian: "Read the Book! See the Movie!"

Fall

This course is intended for students with proficiency in Italian who want to study works of Italian literature in the original, as well as continue their work in the language. The course will study modern Italian novels and the films based on them. We will read the novels as linguistic, literary, and cultural texts and examine the films they inspired as both language and “translation.” The texts and films will be chosen to reflect a range of issues in modern Italian culture: regionalism, Sicily and the mafia, fascism and antifascism, politics and social history. Class work will be supplemented by a grammar review based on analisi logica, using Italian scholastic texts. Conference work may explore Italian literature or Italian film and may also focus on further perfecting language skills. There will be emphasis on writing Italian through the frequent submission of short papers, and weekly conferences with the language assistant will offer additional opportunities to speak Italian.

Faculty

Beginning Italian

Year

This course, for students with no previous knowledge of Italian, aims at giving the student a complete foundation in the Italian language with particular attention to the oral and written communication of everyday use and all aspects of Italian culture. The course will be conducted in Italian after the first month and will involve the study of all basic structures of the language—phonological, grammatical, and syntactical—with practice in conversation, reading, composition, and translation. In addition to the basic Italian grammar and an array of supplementary computer and Internet material, the course will also include texts from prose fiction, poetry, journalistic prose, songs, films, recipe books, and the language of publicity. Conference work is largely based on reading and writing, and the use of the language is encouraged through games and creative composition. The course also has a conversation component in regular workshops with the language assistants. Supplementary activities such as opera and relevant exhibits in New York City are made available, as possible. Credit for the course is contingent upon completing the full year, by the end of which students attain a basic competence in all aspects of the language.

Faculty

Previous courses

Advanced Italian: Read the Book! See the movie!

Fall

This course is intended for students with proficiency in Italian who want to study works of Italian literature in the original, as well as continue their work in the language. The course will study modern Italian novels and the films based on them. We will read the novels as linguistic, literary, and cultural texts and examine the films they inspired as both language and “translation.” The texts and films will be chosen to reflect a range of issues in modern Italian culture: regionalism, Sicily and the mafia, fascism and antifascism, politics and social history. Class work will be supplemented by a grammar review based on analisi logica, using Italian scholastic texts. Conference work may explore Italian literature or Italian film and may also focus on further perfecting language skills. There will be emphasis on writing Italian through the frequent submission of short papers, and weekly conferences with the language assistant will offer additional opportunities to speak Italian.

Faculty

Intermediate Italian: Modern Italian Prose

Year

This course will constitute an in-depth review of Italian grammar and an introduction to modern Italian literature and culture. For each aspect of the grammar, we will use a text—short stories, poems, songs, films, newspaper articles, plays, novels—that will serve as a focus for aspects of Italian culture, as well as elements of the language. Work on the Web is an integral part of the course for grammar exercises and research, as well as a source for audio, video, and film. Web activities will include topics such as planning a trip, writing a film review, creating a recipe, describing a sports event. Writing assignments will include critical analysis of literary texts, as they evolve from the weekly reading assignments of authors such as Calvino, Eco, Moravia, Pavese, Fo, and many others. Conference work will focus on an author, a genre, or a topic of particular interest to the student. All students attend conversation sections twice a week.

Faculty