Anthony Schultz

Undergraduate Discipline

Physics

BA, Sarah Lawrence College. PhD, City University of New York Graduate Center. Author of research papers in human motion analysis, new media, and physics education. Current research in physiological computing and human performance. Taught at Horace Mann, SUNY Maritime, Manhattan College, and in the dance program at Sarah Lawrence College. Recent participation in Choreography for Blackboards and AUNTS is Dance. SLC, 2013–

Current undergraduate courses

Introduction to Electromagnetism, Light, and Modern Physics (General Physics Without Calculus)

Spring

This course covers the topics of electromagnetism, optics, special relativity, and quantum mechanics. Emphasis will be placed on scientific skills, including problem solving, development of physical intuition, computational skills, scientific communication, use of technology, and development and execution of experiments. Seminars will incorporate discussion, exploratory, and problem-solving activities. In addition, the class will meet weekly to conduct laboratory work. (If more than one lab section is listed in the schedule, you may choose either.)

Faculty
Related Cross-Discipline Paths

Introduction to Mechanics (General Physics Without Calculus)

Fall

This course covers introductory classical mechanics, including dynamics, kinematics, momentum, energy, and gravity. Students considering careers in architecture or the health sciences, as well as those interested in physics for physics’ sake, should take either this course or Classical Mechanics. Emphasis will be placed on scientific skills, including problem solving, development of physical intuition, computational skills, scientific communication, use of technology, and development and execution of experiments. Seminars will incorporate discussion, exploratory, and problem-solving activities. In addition, the class will meet weekly to conduct laboratory work. (If more than one lab section is listed in the schedule, you may choose either.) This course or equivalent is required to take Introduction to Electromagnetism, Light, and Modern Physics (General Physics Without Calculus) in the spring.

Faculty

Previous courses

Classical Mechanics (Calculus-Based General Physics)

Fall

The science of classical mechanics forms the basis upon which all physical science is built. This course is devoted to studying the motion of massive bodies in line with the foundational principles put forth in Newton's Principia (1687). We begin by discussing measurement and the variable motion of bodies. Next, we will look at the causes of changing motion, namely forces, and various ways of representing them and their action. Finally, we will cover the dynamics of many-body systems and their thermodynamic properties. Emphasis will be on mathematical problem solving, conceptual understanding, and effective communication using the standard modes of scientific publishing. A weekly laboratory session will also be conducted.

Faculty

Electromagnetism and Light (Calculus-Based General Physics)

Spring

This course covers topics in classical physics. We begin by discussing fields—specifically, the electric field. What causes it? What does it look like? What does it do? We then use our knowledge of electric fields to understand current flow and simple circuits. From there, we discuss magnets and magnetic fields. Again, we’ll cover how magnetic fields are formed, what they look like, and what they do. After talking about electricity and magnetism separately, we will bring them together—electromagnetism—and see how they relate to light. We’ll talk about light from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view, as well as optical devices such as cameras, microscopes, telescopes, and the eye. Emphasis will be on mathematical problem solving, as well as on conceptual understanding. A weekly laboratory session will also be conducted. An optional course-within-a-course, preparing students for the MCAT, will be available for premed students and will count as part of their conference work.

Faculty