Sara Rudner

Sara Rudner

Undergraduate Discipline

Dance

Graduate Program

MFA Dance Program

BA, Barnard College. MFA, Bennington College. Dancer and choreographer; participated in the development and performance of Twyla Tharp’s modern dance repertory; founded and directed the Sara Rudner Performance Ensemble. Recent choreographic projects include Dancing-on-View, one of a series of dance marathons, and Heartbeat, a fusion of technology and dance. Currently a member of Ersaloly Mameraem, a dancers’ consortium; past collaborations have included Mikhail Baryshnikov, Dana Reitz, and Christopher Janney. Choreographer for theatre and opera productions at the Public Theater, Salzburg Festival, Santa Fe Opera, and Paris Opéra. Awards include a Bessie, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial fellowship, a Dance Magazine award, and support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts. SLC, 1999–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Dance

Beginning Improvisation

Component—Year

Merge your imagination and movement potential through dance improvisation. This invaluable creative mode offers students the opportunity to recognize and develop sensations, ideas, and visions of dancing possibilities. Internal and external perceptions will be honed while looking at movement from many points of view—as an individual and in partnership with others. This class is an entry into the creative trajectory that later leads to composition and dance making.

Faculty

Composition

Component—Year

Movement and creativity are the birthrights of every human being. This component will explore expressive and communicative movement possibilities by introducing different strategies for making dances. Problems posed run the gamut from conceptually-driven dance/theatre to structured movement improvisations. Learn to access and mold kinetic vocabularies collaboratively or individually and to incorporate music, sound, gesture, text, and objects in pursuit of a vision. Students will be asked to create and perform studies, direct one another, and share and discuss ideas and solutions with peers. Students are not required to make finished products but, rather, to involve themselves in the challenges and joys of rigorous play.

Faculty

Graduate Courses

Dance 2017-2018

Graduate Seminar III

Graduate Seminar—Year

This seminar emphasizes a dynamic foundation for dancing, offering participants an opportunity to refine their technique and analytical skills. Relevant aspects of functional anatomy are presented and considered throughout this class. Students are encouraged and coached to increase awareness of their current strategies, broaden their range of movement possibilities, and integrate their creative and technical practices.

Faculty

Composition

Component—Year

In this component we will explore how time, syntax, and form combine to communicate intention and meaning in dance making. We will create movement material that we will shape with the goal of experiencing and observing how sound/musical environments, spatial choices, performance style, etc. impact work. Please come prepared to dance, imagine, and respond while we identify and question assumptions.

Faculty

Previous Courses

First-Year Studies in Dance

Open , FYS—Year

The Dance program encourages first-year students to study aspects of dance in an integrated and vital curriculum of technical movement practices, improvisation, and dance history. In technical practice classes such as Contemporary and Ballet, emphasis is placed on developing awareness of space and time, use of energy, articulation of form through sensation, and building strength and control with an understanding of functional anatomy. This year, First-Year Studies in Dance and First-Year Studies in Theatre classes will meet together weekly to explore and create work that will meld both modalities through improvisation and composition. Structured activities will form a framework for investigating mutual interests. Our goals include honing perceptive and communicative skills and constructing a viable foundation from which to work creatively. In Dance History, students will explore the history of concert dance in the United States from the early 20th century to the present. First-Year Studies in Dance seminar provides students with an additional weekly forum to expand analytical skills, both oral and written, for communication, independent research, and study. We will consider and cultivate critical perspectives on dance as an art form through class exercises, discussion, reading, writing, and oral presentations. We will build skills in each of those areas throughout the year. In sum, these components are designed to encourage individual investigation and development of community centered on dance.

Faculty

Graduate Seminar II

Seminar

This seminar is a laboratory for developing and refining projects from the “Dance Making” class. It is designed to encourage students to work collaboratively in solving questions of physical, spatial and temporal issues in their work, to explore connections between dance and other forms , and to make them aware of and conversant with the creative process always at work in the world.

Faculty

Dance Making

Component—Year

Prerequisites: Dance Composition and permission of the instructor.

Individual choreographic projects will be designed and directed by seniors and graduate students with special interest and experience in dance composition. Students and faculty will meet weekly to view works-in-progress and to discuss relevant artistic and practical problems. Whenever possible, the music for these projects, whether new or extant, will be performed live in concert. Dance Making students are encouraged to enroll in Lighting Design and Stagecraft for Dance.

Faculty

Senior Seminar

Component—Year

This class is designed to support the creative and technical practices, as well as the practical concerns, of students in their senior year. It will also serve as a forum for discussions of art practices in other media and the nature of the creative process. Choreographic projects will be presented and discussed in seminar and in conference.

Faculty