Kanishka Raja

BA, Hampshire College. MFA, Meadows School of the Arts, Southern Methodist University. Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, 2000. Recipient: 2011 Painters and Sculptors grant, Joan Mitchell Foundation; 2004 Artists’ Prize, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; 2006 fellow, Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Umbertide, Italy; NEA residency fellow, International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP), New York; and workspace residency, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC), New York. Recent solo exhibitions: Greenberg Van Doren Gallery, New York; Jack Tilton, New York; Galerie Mirchandani + Steinrücke, Mumbai; and ICA Boston. Recent teaching positions include Yale University School of Art, Williams College, Massachusetts College of Art & Design, Rhode Island School of Design. SLC, 2015–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Visual and Studio Arts

Seeing Is Believing: How to Draw the World

Open , Small seminar—Fall

Even in the image-drenched, media-saturated, digital universe in which we live, the act of drawing remains a fundamental means by which to record, document, translate, and analyze the worlds we inhabit. Drawing communicates with an immediacy and directness that transcends language and facilitates understanding. From film to fashion, animation to game design, every aspect of visual culture depends on the primacy of drawing as a means by which to communicate our ideas and interpret our environment. Learning to draw the world can thus be said to be the process of learning to see the world. By following some basic principles of observation and expression, this is an ability available to anyone willing to allow his/her eye and mind to be receptive to patient practice. Designed for all levels of expertise, from beginner to advanced, this class will explore multiple approaches to drawing, from observation to invention, using a variety of media ranging from graphite to ink, watercolor, and alternate media.

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Art Is a Lie: Making Paintings About the World

Open , Small seminar—Spring

Using Picasso’s famous observation as a frame of reference and a prompt, this class will explore ways in which to represent our contemporary lives via the medium of painting. In an age of ubiquitous digital media, painting has proven to be a surprisingly effective and resilient means for artists to comment incisively on every aspect of our world. Contemporary painters address issues ranging from climate change to social justice, geo to gender politics, globalization to the most local and personal narratives. Through an exploration of basic techniques of oil painting, as well as by studying examples of works by today’s artists, students will embark on the process of developing their own voice and visual language by which to express their ideas and subjects. A combination of studio-based experimentation, discussions, presentations, and field trips to museums and galleries will be involved. Projects may also focus on the impact and relevance of digital technology on the form, content, and modes of production of contemporary painting. Open to all levels of expertise, from beginner to experienced, the emphasis in this class will be on learning and refining basic techniques and nurturing your ideas into fruition.

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Previous Courses

Experiments in Drawing

Open , Seminar—Fall

An immersive exploration into drawing in its many guises and forms, students will be introduced to multiple media and drawing techniques with emphasis on working from observation. Beginning with simple explorations of fundamental concepts—line, contour, value, scale, and space—we will gradually proceed toward more complex combinations that challenge your imagination and creative process. Presentations and field trips will help provide context to drawing’s history as an autonomous mode of expression. Conference projects will provide opportunities to pursue individual and self-directed interests and play a critical role in the evolution of the class.

Faculty

Post-Analog: Contemporary Painting in the Digital Age

Intermediate , Seminar—Spring

Prior college-level painting experience preferred. Familiarity with image-editing software, such as Photoshop, may be useful but is not required.

The gradual shift from analog to digital media has been one of the most significant transformations of our time—one that permeates every aspect of our visual culture and profoundly informs the ways by which we produce, distribute, and consume images. How does painting function in this vastly altered landscape of information? What kind of tools and insights does painting possess that might allow it to thrive as a discipline and mode of inquiry and expression in the 21st century? Through studio-based experiments, discussions, readings, presentations, and field trips, we will attempt over the semester to grapple with some of these questions. Working with both traditional and nontraditional media, class projects will focus on the forms and content of contemporary painting, including the impact and relevance of digital technology on its modes of production. Conference projects will provide opportunities to pursue individual and self-directed interests and play a critical role in the evolution of the class.

Faculty

Post-Analog: Painting in a Digital Age

Open , Seminar—Fall

Prior college-level painting experience is required. Students are encouraged to bring examples or images of relevant past work to the interview.

The gradual shift from analog to digital media has been one of the most significant transformations of our time, one that permeates every aspect of our visual culture and profoundly informs the ways by which we produce, distribute, and consume images. How does painting function in this vastly altered landscape of information? What kind of tools and insights does it possess that might allow it to thrive as a discipline and mode of inquiry and expression in the 21st century? Through rigorous studio-based experimentation, discussions, readings, presentations, and field trips, we will attempt to grapple with some of these questions over the semester. Projects will focus on the impact and relevance of digital technology on the form, content, and modes of production of contemporary painting. We will work with both traditional and nontraditional media, and studio work will be supplemented with independent research into the complex multiple histories of painting.

Faculty
Related Disciplines