Susan Orkand

BA, University of California–Los Angeles. MA, Goucher College–Baltimore. Board-certified dance/movement Therapist; certified movement analyst in the Laban Movement Analysis system; experienced registered yoga teacher; more than 30 years of clinical and supervisory experience, including working with pediatric hematology/oncology at Hackensack University Medical Center, New Jersey, for 18 years—seven of which were in an integrative palliative care initiative on a pediatric intensive care unit at The David Center for Children’s Pain and Palliative Care. Previously, worked at Trinitas Hospital in Elizabeth, New Jersey, for more than 10 years as a clinical specialist supervisor of the creative arts therapy program in a child and adolescent psychiatry department; before that, developed a movement-based program for children with autism and their families. Recently worked with adults with developmental disabilities as the director of recreation therapy at Richmond Community Services in Mount Kisco, New York. Taught, led, and supervised workshops throughout her career; published many articles and has been a principal investigator and co-investigator on research studies in pediatric oncology and palliative care. Serves on the editorial board of the American Journal of Dance Therapy and has maintained active involvement in statewide and national activities associated with the American Dance Therapy Association. SLC, 2014–

Graduate Courses

Dance/Movement Therapy 2017-2018

Graduate Seminar in Methods and Theory of DMT I

Graduate Seminar—Fall

This is the first in a four-part series of process-oriented seminars, which function as a laboratory for the study of dance/movement therapy methods and theory. In this course, we combine didactic, experiential and collaborative learning to examine the historical, cultural and clinical aspects of DMT. Students will learn about DMT pioneers, their theoretical contributions and the relationship of DMT to the origins and development of psychology. They will also be introduced to foundational movement-based techniques intrinsic to the practice of DMT as they begin to develop a common conceptual and kinesthetic framework rooted in developmental and integrative movement.

Faculty

Graduate Seminar in Methods and Theory of DMT II

Graduate Seminar—Spring

This is the second part of a four-semester process-oriented course that functions as a laboratory in which to study the methods and theory of DMT. It will combine didactic, experiential and collaborative learning as it builds on the first semester to synthesize dance/movement therapy practice with knowledge of human development, for application in various clinical circumstances. Students will learn techniques of practice specific to clinical populations, such as children, adolescents, the physically ill and/or those coping with aging, physical disabilities, mental illness, addiction disorders, or are survivors of physical and/or emotional trauma.

Faculty

Graduate Seminar in Methods and Theory of DMT III

Graduate Seminar—Fall

This course is the third in a series of four on the methods and theory of dance/movement therapy for clinical practice. Our focus will be on the experience of embodiment and on broadening and deepening the students’ practice of dance/movement therapy as we examine cultural, spiritual, and socioeconomic perspectives on dance and healing.

Faculty

Graduate Seminar in Methods and Theory of DMT IV

Graduate Seminar—Spring

This course will examine clinical applications of expressive arts modalities, such as art, music, poetry, and drama for the purpose of understanding their relationship to DMT and how they can be used in conjunction with DMT to enhance and support treatment interventions. We will also examine the use of the artistic elements of dance such as choreography and performance to support a variety of mental and physical health goals. The course will have several visiting faculty with expertise in the arts and the creative arts therapies.

Faculty

Movement Observation I

Graduate Seminar—Fall

This class is the first in a series of three on movement observation and assessment skills. The course provides an introduction to Bartenieff Fundamentals and Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) and their application in Dance/Movement Therapy. The relationship between Bartenieff Fundamentals, human development, and Effort-Space-Shape will be discussed and explored through movement. Coursework in anatomy and kinesiology will be used to support understanding of these frameworks.

Faculty

Movement Observation III

Graduate Seminar—Fall

Movement Observation III serves as a continuation of the course work in Movement Observation I and II. Movement Observation III introduces the fundamentals of the Kestenberg Movement Profile (KMP), a theoretically based assessment tool that examines psychological development through body movement. Students’ understanding of Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) and its application in the therapeutic process is deepened with the addition of KMP as part of the movement development, relationship, learning, and psychological process. Additionally, ways of organizing observations and developing targeted assessments utilizing KMP will be considered. Students will also learn about current theories in neuroscience and their relation to movement observation.

Faculty

Movement Observation of Children Fieldwork

Fieldwork—Fall

Students will have the opportunity for observation, research, and practicum experience. First-semester placements are at the Early Childhood Center, the campus laboratory preschool, allowing students to study typically developing children from ages 2 through 6, or at other sites with young children. These fieldwork hours are not counted toward the clinical internship requirement of 700 hours.

Faculty