Merceditas Mañago-Alexander

BA, SUNY–Empire State College. Dancer with Doug Varone and Dancers, Pepatian, Elisa Monte Dance Company, Ballet Hispanico, and independent choreographers such as Sara Rudner and Joyce S. Lim. Recipient of the Outstanding Student Artist Award from the University of the Philippines Presidents’ Committee on Culture and the Arts. Taught at Alvin Ailey School; guest faculty member, 92nd Street Y, Marymount Manhattan College, Metropolitan Opera Ballet, New York University Tisch School of the Arts, Rutgers University Mason Gross School of the Performing Arts. Participant/teacher, 2004 Bates Festival-Young Dancers Workshop; solo works: Free Range Arts, Dixon Place, Brooklyn Arts Exchange, and Danspace Project/St. Mark’s Church. SLC, 2002–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Dance

Dance Movement Fundamentals

Component—Year

Movement and dancing are definitive signs of life! In every environment and at every level of existence, from single-cell organisms to entire populations, dancing is innate to living beings. This class is open to all interested participants, with no prior experience in dance required. The objective here is to awaken/reawaken students’ connection to movement as an elemental mode of human experience and learning. Students are introduced to some basic principles of dancing, as well as to strategies for preparing for dancing. Building fundamental skills for a wide range of movement studies, the focus is centered on learning movement and refining individual, partnered, and group performance in a variety of patterns and styles. Basic anatomical information is used to facilitate an understanding of dynamic alignment and movement potentials. Challenges in coordination, rhythm, range, and dynamic quality are systematically engaged, allowing students to gain strength, flexibility, endurance, balance, musicality, and awareness in the dance setting. While the primary emphasis is placed on learning structured material, improvisation and composition are incorporated to support students’ growing engagement with dance as an art form. Students who have successfully completed this course will be prepared to enter Contemporary Practice I and/or Ballet I.

Faculty

Ballet

Component—Year

Students may enter this yearlong course in the second semester only with permission of the teacher.

Ballet students of all levels will be guided toward creative and expressive freedom in their dancing, enhancing the qualities of ease, grace, musicality, and symmetry that define this form. We will explore alignment, with an emphasis on anatomical principles; we will cultivate awareness of how to enlist the appropriate neuromuscular effort for efficient movement; and we will coordinate all aspects of body, mind, and spirit, integrating them harmoniously.

Faculty

Graduate Courses

Dance 2017-2018

Ballet

Component—Year

Students may enter this yearlong course in the second semester only with permission of the teacher.

At all levels, ballet studies will guide students in creative and expressive freedom by enhancing the qualities of ease, grace, musicality, and symmetry that define the form. To this end, we will explore alignment with an emphasis on anatomical principles and enlist the appropriate neuromuscular effort needed to dance with optimal integration of every aspect of the individual body, mind, and spirit. 

Faculty

Previous Courses

Modern and Postmodern Practice

Component—Year

In these classes, emphasis will be on the continued development of basic skills, energy use, strength, and control relevant to the particular style of each teacher. At all levels, attention will be given to sharpening each student’s awareness of time and energy and to disciplining the body to move rhythmically, precisely, and in accordance with sound anatomical principles. Intermediate and advanced students will study more complex movement patterns, investigate somatic use, and concentrate on the demands of performance.

Faculty

Contemporary 3

Seminar—Year

The course will be taught by Ms. Welliver in the fall and Mr. Kyle in the spring.

Emphasis will be on the continued development of basic skills, energy use, strength, and control relevant to the particular style of each teacher. Attention will be given to sharpening each student’s awareness of time and energy and to disciplining the body to move rhythmically, precisely, and in accordance with sound anatomical principles. The students in this advance class will study complex movement patterns, investigate somatic use, and concentrate on the demands of performance.

Faculty