Jazmín López

Universidad del Cine, Buenos Aires. MFA, New York University. A filmmaker, visual artist, and professor. López participated in the WhitneyISP program. Her work has been featured in venues such as Fondation Pernod Ricard, San Jose Museum, OCAT, Tabacalera, Kadist, Istanbul Biennial, Orizzonti official competition Venezia Biennial, Rotterdam Film Fest, Viennale, New Directors New Films at MoMA and Lincoln Center, Centre George Pompidou, and KW institute Berlin, among many other world film festivals, and has been featured in Variety and The New York Times. SLC, 2023–

Undergraduate Courses 2024-2025

Filmmaking and Moving Image Arts

Advanced Short-Film Projects I

Advanced, Large seminar—Fall

FILM 4100

Prerequisite: Preproduction, Screenwriting, or Production course in filmmaking

In this course, students will be required to have a short film project that they want to do, either a script or a clear and consistent idea for a short film of a maximum seven minutes. In Part I of the yearlong course, we will be tailoring the film idea into a project that is ready to shoot. Analyzing scenes, reading, and creatively putting together the mise-en-scène of the student’s original idea would be our aim. In order to build up a cinematic vocabulary for each project, we will be analyzing, in depth, the tone, style, concept, and proposal that the student is looking for—understanding the aesthetics by watching clips, shorts, and films in order to see how other authors have solved similar ideas on set. Participants will, therefore, have a profound and conceptually well-developed knowledge of each of their own shots and scenes for the projects. By the end of the semester, each student will have a project that is ready to shoot in Advanced Short-Film Projects, Part II. A jury or committee will choose about eight projects from the group to shoot in the spring semester (Advanced Short-Film Projects, Part II).

Faculty

First-Year Studies: Image, Sound, and Time

FYS—Year

FILM 1003

This is a course in which you will conceive a short film from its very basis to the final completion. In the first half of the year, we will explore a creative and deep examination of the foundations and processes of writing with images and sounds. The course provides a path to a certain type of sensitivity that helps writers create not just the screenplay for the course but also all of their screenplays to follow. What are the fundamental skills you need for writing a film? What is the time of observation that we need to do in order to be able to translate it into words? The script is a descriptive representation of the images and sounds that the writer has created in his or her imagination—beginning with the construction of an image that nests a story and exploring its possible forms and shapes, imagining characters from the inside outward, and then situating them in the image to let them grow. In the second part of the year, we will be exploring all of the areas of staging and styles in order to digest all of the information that we can make out of the script—from the very first impression of our story, through the actual image, until the editing. Working with each other on projects in a constructive and meaningful way and exploring an audiovisual style, the course will provide interaction and exposure to a wide range of types of film styles— from small to large productions. Some of our guiding questions will be: How do we understand the core of our image? How do we see scripts from a directing point of view? How is the image able to transmit emotions and thoughts? How can we develop critical and well-formulated thoughts of a film idea and expand our personal visual research? This class will have weekly conferences at least for the first semester.

Faculty

Writing From Imagination

Open, Seminar—Spring

FILM 3221

In a world filled with moving images, we are all highly capable spectators as well as screenwriters. In this course, we will deepen and complement our existing knowledge of the cinematic medium, challenge our assumptions, and experiment with new ways of conceiving and making cinema. This course explores a creative and deep examination of the foundations and processes of writing with images and sounds, unveiling the knowledge that the students already have and work from there. The course provides a path to a certain type of sensitivity that helps the writer to create not just the screenplay for the course but also all of their screenplays to follow. Understanding the capacity of the medium is the most important objective: to explore its own capacity of expressing emotions by the hand of narration—but not only by it; introducing a variety of ways film can be made and seen; investigating in a creative way the mise-en-scènes aspects that can be explored in the writing process; from contemporary to classical screenwriting sensitivities; from European to Latin American filmmaking. The idea is to expand the knowledge of the variety and range of films beyond the most mainstream productions. What are the fundamental skills you need for writing a film? What is the time of observation we need to do in order to be able to translate it into words? The script is a descriptive representation of the images and sounds that the writer has created in his/her imagination, beginning with the construction of an image that nests a story and exploring its possible forms and shapes, imagining characters from the inside outward, and then situating them in the image to let them grow. In other words, to be able to pack entire worlds of thought, feeling, and imagination into the writing of scenes.

Faculty

Previous Courses

Filmmaking and Moving Image Arts

From Ideas to Postproduction

Open, Seminar—Year

This is a course in which you will conceive a short film from its very basis to the final completion. In the first half of the year, we will explore a creative and deep examination of the foundations and processes of writing with images and sounds. The course provides a path to a certain type of sensitivity that helps writers create not just the screenplay for the course but also all of their screenplays to follow. What are the fundamental skills you need for writing a film? What is the time of observation we need to do in order to be able to translate it into words? The script is a descriptive representation of the images and sounds that the writer has created in his or her imagination—beginning with the construction of an image that nests a story and exploring its possible forms and shapes, imagining characters from the inside outward, and then situating them in the image to let them grow. In the second part of the year, we will be exploring all of the areas of staging and styles in order to digest all of the information that we can make out of the script—from the very first impression of our story, through the actual image, until the editing. Working with each other on projects in a constructive and meaningful way and exploring an audiovisual style, the course will provide interaction and exposure to a wide range of types of film styles— from small to large productions. Some of our guiding questions will be: How do we understand the core of our image? How do we see scripts from a directing point of view? How is the image able to transmit emotions and thoughts? How can we develop critical and well-formulated thoughts of a film idea and expand our personal visual research?

Faculty

Short Film Composition

Open, Seminar—Fall

This is a film production course in which we will deepen and knowledge on how to find a voice in audiovisual language and be able to do a short film after exploring all of the areas of staging and styles. The course objective is to provide tools to critically digest all of the information we can make out of the script from the very first impression of our story, through the actual image, until the editing. We will work with each other on projects in a constructive and meaningful way and explore an audiovisual style. The course will provide interaction with and exposure to a broad range of types of film styles, from small to large productions. Students will also do exercises trying to find their voice and to develop possible types of mise-en-scène in regards to their audiovisual ideas and research. To better inform our discussions of the students’ materials, we will watch crucial fragments of films relevant to their research. Some of our guiding questions will be: How can we understand the core of our image? How do we see scripts from a directing point of view? How is the image able to transmit emotions and thoughts? How can we develop critical and well-formulated thoughts of a film idea and expand our personal visual research?

Faculty

Your Cinema Vocabulary

Open, Seminar—Spring

In a world filled with moving images, we are all highly capable spectators as well as screenwriters. In this course, we will deepen and complement our existing knowledge of the cinematic medium, challenge our assumptions, and experiment with new ways of conceiving and making cinema. This course explores a creative and deep examination of the foundations and processes of writing with images and sounds, unveiling the knowledge that the students already have and work from there. The course provides a path to a certain type of sensitivity that helps the writer create not just the screenplay for the course but also all of their screenplays to follow. Understanding the capacity of the medium is the most important objective. Introducing a variety of ways in which film can be made and seen—from contemporary to classical screenwriting sensitivities and from European to Latin American filmmaking—the idea is to expand our knowledge of the variety and range of films beyond the most mainstream productions. What are the fundamental skills you need for writing a film? What is the time of observation we need in order to be able to translate it into words? The script is a descriptive representation of the images and sounds that the writer has created in his/her imagination beginning with the construction of an image that nests a story and exploring its possible forms and shapes, imagining characters from the inside outward, and then situating them in the image to let them grow—in other words, to be able to pack entire worlds of thought, feeling, and imagination into the writing of scenes.

Faculty