Jason Krugman

BA, Tufts University. MPS, New York University, Interactive Telecommunications Program. Founded Jason Krugman Studio to develop self-initiated and commissioned interactive and illuminated artworks. Clients include Wired Magazine, BMWi, NYC Parks Department, CW Television Network (Gossip Girl) and Claremont University Consortium. His work has been projected on the facade of the New Museum in New York City, commissioned by the Schuylkill Environmental Art Center, shown in galleries in Barcelona and Milan, featured widely in the international media, and blogged about by the Creator’s Project and The New York Times. Previously a visiting artist and teacher at the New School for Liberal Studies. SLC, 2012–

Course Information

Current undergraduate courses

Motors, Lights, and Logic

Spring

This is a course for students interested in electrical technology and the science behind it. We will focus on low-voltage DC power, getting into the basics of what it is and creatively prototyping some of our ideas. The course will provide an introduction to the Arduino microcontroller, as we use it to control moving things and various electrical gadgetry. We will learn just enough programming to be dangerous, allowing us to convert digital signals into physical outcomes and vice versa. The class will cover various transducers, which transform one type of energy into another, and actuators, which create motion from potential energy. A series of in-class prototyping workshops will introduce students to a variety of materials and building strategies, while outside-of-class assignments build upon each week's lab. This class will be especially useful for students interested in expanding their knowledge of applied physical science and design. While there are no prerequisites, some experience in drawing, coding, and/or building physical things will be useful.

Faculty
Related Cross-Discipline Paths

Previous courses

Drawing Machines

Fall

From environmentally powered drawings to computer vision and motors, drawing machines serve as a vehicle to visualize the energy patterns in the world around us in new and interesting ways. In this class, we will examine drawing machines from the perspective of the hacker and the inventor, applying technical and nontechnical tools alike to create emergent behaviors in our work. The class will begin with a survey of practitioners within the field of process-oriented art and evolve into an exploration of basic interactive circuitry and programming. We will spend a significant amount of time learning how to build projects with the Arduino microcontroller platform. A series of in-class prototyping workshops will introduce students to a variety of materials and building strategies, while outside-of-class assignments will build upon each week’s explorations into generative art-making techniques. In addition to regular class meetings and conferences, students will be expected to participate in weekly group workshops that will facilitate skill sharing and group problem solving. Experimentation and learning through concerted effort will be paramount.

Faculty

Kinetic Sculpture with Arduino

Spring

Sculpture is as much about motion as it is about materials. Whether a piece resists the stressors of its environment or actively responds to them, our relation to three-dimensional artwork depends upon both the implied motion of static forms and their kinetic aspects. In this class, we will utilize circuitry and interactive electronics to create sculptures that move and have the ability to respond to their audience and environment. We will utilize the Arduino microcontroller platform and learn about the basics of motor control, sensors, and programming. Prior programming and electronics experience is not required, but an interest in emerging media tools will be a useful asset. We will study artists working within the field, referencing and building upon existing work in the process of developing our own ideas. Through hands-on prototyping, testing, and finishing, we will grow our skill sets and become increasingly adept at navigating the junction between concept and feasibility.

Faculty

Kinetic Sculpture With Arduino

Spring

Sculpture is as much about motion as it is about materials. Whether a piece resists the stressors of its environment or actively responds to them, our relation to three-dimensional artwork depends upon both the implied motion of static forms and their kinetic aspects. In this class, we will utilize circuitry and interactive electronics to create sculptures that move and have the ability to respond to their audience and environment. We will utilize the Arduino microcontroller platform and learn about the basics of motor control, sensors, and programming. Prior programming and electronics experience is not required, but an interest in emerging media tools will be a useful asset. We will study artists working within the field, referencing and building upon existing work in the process of developing our own ideas. Through hands-on prototyping, testing, and finishing, we will grow our skill sets and become increasingly adept at navigating the junction between concept and feasibility.

Faculty