Tom Jeitner

Tom Jeitner

Undergraduate Discipline

Biology

BSc (Hons), Flinders University, Australia. PhD, Sydney University. Lab research concerns the role of metabolism in the evolution of disease: One project concerns the transformation of alpha-synuclein into an adhesive protein capable of forming Lewy Bodies in Parkinson’s disease; another project concerns novel aspects of the enzymology of glutamine synthetase in cancer. These projects have been funded by industrial concerns, private foundations, and the National Institutes of Health. Previously taught at Albany Medical College and Medical College of Wisconsin. Currently a research associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at New York Medical College. SLC, 2017–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Biology

Neurobiology

Intermediate , Seminar—Fall

Neurons evolved early in the development of eukaryotes. These hardy and sophisticated cells allowed the evolution of organisms as complicated as mammals. Indeed, the mammalian brain represents the most complicated matter in the known universe; it is the only tissue known to give rise to thought and emotions. Much of what we now know of neurons has come from the study of simple organisms, the classic example being the description of the action potential of the squid axon. Consequently, this course will explore the evolution of neurons from those found in simple sea creatures to those found in the human brain. Topics covered will include anatomy, cell biology, biochemistry, and biophysics, as these subjects pertain to neurons and the surrounding support cells. Finally, the impact of these cells on behavior will be discussed.

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