Erin Humbaugh

BS, Bowling Green State University, MA, Antioch New England. Licensed Creative Arts Therapist (LCAT), National Certified Counselor (NCC), Board Certified Dance/Movement Therapist (BC-DMT). Erin did her clinical internship at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Pittsburgh, then worked as a Psychiatric Rehabilitation Therapist at North General Hospital in Harlem, New York, where she provided individual and group dance/movement therapy. She also provided various psycho-educational groups on the inpatient mental illness and chemical addiction unit until the hospital closed in 2010. Subsequently, Erin worked as the Integrative Therapies Coordinator for the Adult Inpatient Psychiatric Units at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital until December 2011. SLC, 2013-

Current graduate courses

Clinical Fieldwork Orientation


Clinical Fieldwork Orientation combines course work to support fieldwork placements in a clinical setting. This course is designed to provide the student with professional orientation and direct exposure to dance/movement therapy practice, an orientation to health and educational systems, and an understanding of the role and function of the dance/movement therapist within each system. Hours earned in clinical fieldwork placement are not counted toward the clinical internship requirement of 700 hours.


Movement Observation III


Movement Observation III serves as a continuation of the course work in Movement Observation I and II. Movement Observation III introduces the fundamentals of the Kestenberg Movement Profile (KMP), a theoretically based assessment tool that examines psychological development through body movement. Students’ understanding of Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) and its application in the therapeutic process is deepened with the addition of KMP as part of the movement development, relationship, learning, and psychological process. Additionally, ways of organizing observations and developing targeted assessments utilizing KMP will be considered. Students will also learn about current theories in neuroscience and their relation to movement observation.


Previous courses