Tishan Hsu

BSAD, MArch, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Sculptor and painter; solo and group exhibitions in the United States, Mexico, and Europe; work included in major private and museum collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, High Museum, Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris), and the Centro Cultural Arte Contemporaneo (Mexico City); honorary member, board of directors, White Columns, New York; recipient of grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. SLC, 1994–

Previous courses

Architecture Studio: Designing Built Form

Spring

This course will introduce the student to architectural design. We will learn the basic language of drawing architectural space and the process of designing within that language. We will read and discuss a range of approaches to: 1) designing habitable space, and 2) how the process of design is applied to a range of interventions in urban and environmental design practices. This will include looking at and thinking about how architecture is an art, one that expresses the values of a culture. We will explore how environmental sustainability is influencing the design of human environments and how to incorporate sustainability into design. The course will be project-based and include drawing, model building, designing with 3-D software, and graphics. Experience in drawing is helpful.

Faculty

Expanded Sculpture II

Spring

This course will continue from Expanded Sculpture I, where we will explore how the artist develops an expanded practice of art making. The structure of a small seminar will allow more in-depth exploration of materials and processes related to object-making, as well as the integration of digital media into a sculptural conception. There will be readings and discussion on selected topics in critical theory that have shaped our understanding of culture and contemporary art as a whole. We will look at the transformation of global cultural practices and their impact on defining a sculptural space and discourse. We will explore several different conceptual frameworks for generating creative responses as a way of building an expanded practice. Students will have access to a range of materials such as cardboard, wood, metal, plaster, digital media, and mechanical systems—with technical support provided in the handling of these media. Experience in the visual, performative, industrial, and/or digital arts is helpful, as students will be expected to work independently. For the interview, students are encouraged to bring images of work done in any medium.

Faculty

First-Year Studies: Things and Beyond

FYS

This course will explore the possibilities for creative production inspired by a range of inquiries, including readings, discussions, critiques, looking at the work of contemporary artists, and observing the work of students in the class as their work unfolds. We will read a range of texts, as well as visit museums and/or galleries. In doing so, we will consider different ways of thinking about art, which will lead us to consider different ways of defining and producing art. We will explore concepts as ways of discovering different subjectivities and situations in which art can become. We will take a global perspective in looking at contemporary art. The course will experiment with the ways in which texts, images, discussions, and activity can alter one’s inner landscape, enabling different kinds of (art) work to emerge. This is predominantly a studio course that will incorporate a range of activities in conjunction with studio work. We will encounter materials such as cardboard, wood, metal, plaster, and digital media, with technical support provided in the handling of these media. Experience in the visual, performative, industrial, and/or digital arts is helpful.

Faculty

Sustainable Architecture Studio Lab

Fall

The design of the built environment is the area of human endeavour that has one of the largest impacts on the environment. Buildings consume vast amounts of natural resources during their construction and subsequent operation. They constitute primary energy consumption and demand the exploitation of natural resources to supply the materials. In use, building emissions add to global warming, damage the environment, and create waste-disposal problems. Buildings can also cause ill health and discomfort for their occupants due to poor air quality and inadequate internal conditions. This course will examine a range of issues associated with sustainable architecture, including energy consumption, use of materials, health and environmental concerns, and how these issues impact the design of built space. We do this through a studio lab context, where we will investigate current strategies for incorporating sustainability into design. This will include examining the Heimbold Visual Arts Center and the strategies used in creating its award-winning “green” building status. Through our own research and designs, we will learn how to identify and integrate environmental concerns into design practice. We will learn the basic language of drawing architectural space and the mechanics of designing within that language. This will include traditional architectural drawing and the use of 3-D design software. Our work will rely on drawing, writing, and oral and graphic presentation skills. Students will work on short and longer projects in an individual and group context. Experience in drawing and/or 3-D computer graphics is helpful.

Faculty

Things and Beyond

Spring

This course will explore the possibilities for creative production in an expanded practice of what is loosely defined as sculpture. We will consider different ways of thinking about art and different ways of thinking about ourselves, what we encounter in the world, and what we can imagine doing as a result of our encounters. We will explore concepts in critical theory that question the role of art, how it is produced, and in what kinds of spaces/sites cultural production can take place. Experimentation with the integration of digital media into sculptural practice will be supported. The course will include readings in which we will explore how texts can enable different kinds of situations to emerge in which art is produced. In doing so, students will be asked to suspend (but not give up) their ideas about what art is and how it should be made. Students will have access to a range of materials—such as cardboard, wood, metal, plaster, digital media, and mechanical systems—with technical support provided in the handling of these media. Experience in the visual, performative, industrial, and/or digital arts is helpful. For the interview, students are encouraged to bring images of work done in any medium.

Faculty