Sally Herships

An independent journalist who has produced or reported for multiple shows and outlets, national and international, including NPR’s All Things Considered, Studio 360, WNYC, and BBC World Service; she is also a regular contributor to NPR’s Marketplace. Her 2010 yearlong investigative project, “The Five Percent Rule,” received the Third Coast Radio Impact Award and a Front Page Award from the Newswomen's Club of New York. Her work has been presented at UnionDocs, and she has taught radio workshops at The New School, Smith College, Feet in Two Worlds, Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls, and Spark Summit for Girls, as well as documentary audio at Fordham University. SLC, 2012–

Course Information

Current undergraduate courses

What Did You Say? A Radio Writing and Production Workshop

Fall

From initial story pitches to final audio files, learn how to write and produce great radio. In this course, we will make radio and, as we do so, explore what it means to write for the ear for both radio and podcasts. The technical aspects involved will include pro-tools, microphone techniques, interviewing skills, and podcast creation. Assignments will involve workshopping our stories, deep listening, critical analysis, and discussion of narrative texts. We’ll listen to and compare a variety of pieces across radio genres and from around the world, from the personal narratives on This American Life to the more artistic, thematic pieces being aired internationally, from ABC and the BBC to the Prix Europa and big-idea stories common to Radiolab and NPR’s Planet Money. As we workshop our pieces, we’ll “mic” ourselves closely, examining what happens at the intersection of sound and the written word. What does it mean to give a literal voice to your writing? How will the words you’ve written on paper adapt as they move onto the air? And how is it best to give voice to someone else’s story? Also, sound can mean theatre and music—when is it ethical to instill drama into a story, and when is it overkill? An end-of-semester field trip to WNYC, New York Public Radio, will be planned.

Faculty
Related Cross-Discipline Paths

Previous courses

Writing, Radio, and Aurality

Fall

In this course, we will explore what it means to write for radio and other aural contexts. The course will involve deep listening, critical analysis, and discussion of narrative texts. We’ll listen to and compare a variety of works across radio genres and from around the world, from the personal narratives on “This American Life” to the more artistic, thematic pieces being aired internationally on ABC and the BBC to the Prix Europa and the big-idea stories common to Radiolab and NPR’s “Planet Money.” All the while, we will be making radio of our own. As we workshop our pieces we’ll “mic” ourselves closely, examining what happens at the intersection of sound and the written word. What does it mean to give a literal voice to your writing? How will the words you’ve written on paper adapt as they move onto the air? And how is it best to give voice to someone else’s story? Also, sound can mean theatre—when is it ethical to instill drama into a story, and when is it overkill? The technical aspects involved in the course will include microphone techniques, interviewing skills, digital editing, and podcast creation. We will plan an end-of-semester field trip to WNYC, New York Public Radio.

Faculty