Dave Hardy

BA, Brown University. MFA, Yale University School of Art. Graduate, The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Recipient of a fellowship in crafts/sculpture from the New York Foundation for the Arts, 2011. Solo shows mounted at Regina Rex, Art in General, 92nd Street Y, Tribeca, and La Mama Galleria (New York); Southern Exposure (San Francisco); and Emerson Dorsch (Miami). Work included in group exhibitions at Bortolami Gallery, Jack Shainman Gallery, Sculpture Center, and PS 1, among others. Forthcoming exhibitions include shows at Churner and Churner (New York) and Wentrup Gallery (Berlin). SLC, 2014–

Course Information

Current undergraduate courses

Close Encounters: Sculpture and Disrupted Space

Spring

Ad Reinhardt once said, "Sculpture is something you bump into when you back up to look at a painting." Watch out, it sounds like a space-inhabiting interloper has upset the artist’s pleasurable viewing experience. Is the painter’s remark a slight on the medium’s extraneous nature? Or is it praise of sculpture’s stubborn in-the-way-ness as another body to be contended with? This second-semester course will explore the haptic and psychological presence of sculpture, with particular attention paid to the ways that context and situation can at once create and destabilize a meaningful art experience. Questions that we will address are: How should a sculpture behave? What does the conceptual space that a work occupies have to do with how it sits in a room or meets the world? When does it become an intervention? Can awkward and uncomfortable proximity create friction and/or value? Did Sarah Lucas change everything? In this course, students are invited to work experimentally to explore the possibilities of sculpture in an experiential continuum and to build on the critical and practical tools necessary to make and contextualize challenging work. Studio process will be emphasized so that students gain a significant understanding of how things are made—so that students may develop the confidence to embrace a risk-taking approach to art making. We will delve into more advanced applications of the processes explored in the first semester course, Sculpture and the Meaning of Making. Through studio demonstrations, individual projects, in-class presentations, related readings, and field trips to galleries and studios, we will investigate issues surrounding the creation of new, relevant, vital work and its context. Each project will be discussed in a group critique, with the aim of helping the artist express a vision in the most focussed and dynamic way possible.

Faculty

Sculpture and the Meaning of Making

Fall

In this first semester course, we will explore an expansive notion of sculpture and work to develop the critical and practical tools necessary to approach artmaking from various directions. As gallery and museum press releases declare works as “blurring the boundaries” between art and other disciplines (such as design, display, film, furniture, architecture, and theatre), students in this class are invited to investigate the practices involved in those distinct worlds and to consider how they might be incorporated into their own sculpture. Studio process will be emphasized so that students come away with a significant understanding of how things are made. We will learn about established sculptural materials and techniques, as well as those used in less traditional fabrication industries. Fieldwork and hands-on experimentation will be critical to create a personal body of work in dialogue with the contemporary art environment and the world at large. Beyond the making of objects, projects may include ephemeral and interdisciplinary practices: actions and their documentation, collaborative work, living strategies, installation, etc. Students will be encouraged to consider the place and context of their projects and to ask questions about whom they want to reach as working artists. Through studio demonstrations, individual projects, in-class presentations, related readings, and field trips to galleries and studios, we will investigate issues surrounding the creation of new, relevant, and vital work. Each project will be discussed in a group critique, with the aim of helping the artist express a vision in the most focused and most dynamic way possible.

Faculty
Related Cross-Discipline Paths

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