Eva Botstein Griepp

BA, Radcliffe College. MD, New York University School of Medicine. Clinical associate professor of pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine. In addition to her clinical work and teaching, Dr. Griepp has done extensive research and editorial work. Since 1990, she has actively participated in the writing and editing of grants, research manuscripts, review articles, and book chapters dealing with hypothermic circulatory arrest and other methods of cerebral protection during aortic surgery, the clinical and laboratory study of ischemic spinal cord injury associated with aortic surgery, and clinical outcomes following all types of aortic surgery. The results of these NIH-funded studies, carried out in the cardiothoracic surgery research laboratory at Mount Sinai, have been published in high-impact, peer-reviewed journals and have been presented regularly at national and international meetings. At Sarah Lawrence College, Dr. Griepp serves on the genetic counseling program’s Admissions Committee and has directed the Embryology course for more than 20 years. In 2014, she received the Joan H. Marks Graduate Program in Human Genetics Exceptional Commitment to Teaching Award. SLC, 1995-

Graduate Courses

Human Genetics 2017-2018

Embryology

Graduate Seminar—Fall

The Embryology course considers the normal development of the human embryo from the earliest stages to birth. The course focuses on the stages, developmental mechanisms, and organ systems with the greatest potential for improving the understanding of the pathophysiology of congenital abnormalities and malformation syndromes. Students learn from discussion and written analysis of clinical cases as well as from didactic material.

Faculty

Previous Courses

Embryology

Graduate Seminar—Fall

This course considers the normal development of the human embryo from the earliest stages to birth. A review of reproductive physiology is followed by a description of the earliest stages of embryonic differentiation and the development of individual organ systems. The course focuses on the stages, developmental mechanisms, and organ systems with greatest potential for improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of congenital abnormalities and malformation syndromes. The role and timing of teratogens, the intrauterine environment in abnormal development, and the contribution of genetic factors are all considered. Through detailed examination of several complex malformation syndromes, students gain insight into the consequences of disrupting the normal synergy between different organ systems during development.

Faculty