Anthony Esposito

Anthony Esposito

Undergraduate Discipline

Biology

BS, CUNY: College of Staten Island. PhD, Rutgers University, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Postdoctoral Fellowship at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Specializes in yeast genetics and molecular virology of HIV. Research interests include microbial stress responses, as well as high throughput screening of HIV inhibitors. Author of papers on yeast oxidative stress pathway, as well as development of assays to identify HIV drug candidates. Previously taught at Wagner College, CUNY: College of Staten Island, in addition to performing research at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. SLC, 2017–

Undergraduate Courses 2017-2018

Biology

An Introduction to HIV

Open , Seminar—Fall

HIV is among the most researched viral pathogens in human history; yet, despite many major breakthroughs in treatment, a true cure still eludes us. From the virus’s rapid mutation rate, as well the selective targeting of major immune response regulators, HIV seems a thing of nightmares slowly robbing its victims of their ability to defend themselves from the hordes of microbes that surround us. In this course, we will discuss a brief history of HIV and its 30+ years epidemic that is responsible for the deaths of more than 35 million people to date. We will then look at how the virus replicates and spreads in humans, how the immune system fights back, and how HIV overcomes this resistance. We will also cover the research methodology that has been used to keep the virus at bay, as well as the hurdles are standing in the way of its complete eradication.

Faculty

Genetics

Open , Seminar—Fall

With the astounding diversity of life as we know it, it is shocking to see how unified we are by the molecules that encode life. The replication and transmission of genetic material is central to the continued existence of all organisms. In this course, we will discuss the replication of genetic material at both the molecular level and the chromosomal level in both mitosis and meiosis. In addition, we will discuss the expression of genes and how this highly regulated process controls the physical and behavioral features of an organism. We will also cover the technology that we have used to edit organisms at the genetic level and finally conclude with genetics at the population level. This class also involves weekly lab sessions that reinforce the genetics concepts learned in class with hands-on experiments.

Faculty
Related Disciplines