Jason Douglass

BA, MA, Yale University. Special interests in animation; film and media theory; and bringing questions of gender, race, sexuality, and class to bear on the history of East Asian cinema. Studied filmmaking at the Film and TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague, Chinese at National Taiwan University, and Japanese at numerous institutions including the Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama. Recipient of awards and fellowships from the Society for Animation Studies, the Richard U. Light Fellowship, Yale’s Council on East Asian Studies, and Yale’s Fund for Lesbian and Gay Studies. His recent publications may be found in Film QuarterlyAnimation Studies Online Journal, Women Film Pioneers Project, Animation Studies 2.0, and the forthcoming edited collection Animation and Advertising (eds. Kirsten Moana Thompson and Malcolm Cook, Palgrave Macmillan). His past translation projects include a special exhibition and catalogue for the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, volunteer work at the Yamagata International Documentary Film Festival, and a year-in-review publication for the city of Matsudo’s artist-in-residence program. In addition to his contributions at Sarah Lawrence College and Yale, he has presented his research at New York University, Boston University, University of Tübingen, UCLA, the Kyoto Manga Museum, and at international conferences hosted by the Society for Animation Studies and the Society for Cinema and Media Studies. SLC, 2019-

Undergraduate Courses 2019-2020

Film History

Introduction to Animation Studies

Open , Lecture—Fall

Students who are interested in pursuing a film-making project for their final project have the option of registering for this class under Filmmaking and Moving Image Arts.

To animate is to bring to life, to instill movement into that which would otherwise be still. Animated films grant their viewers access to imaginary worlds that are frequently populated by anthropomorphic animals, fantastical environments, and utopian societies. But animation takes many forms. This course offers a broad survey of the global history of animation by embracing the diversity of those forms and by encouraging students to draw connections between the techniques and materials employed by animators and the political, social, and cultural functions of animated texts. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of ways in which animation has historically been created, including works made with sand, paper, puppets, pixels, clay, cels, pinscreens, garbage, and other unconventional materials. Along the way, students will familiarize themselves with key films, filmmakers, filmic technologies, and filmmaking traditions by studying animation from various eras, genres, industries, and countries. In addition to featuring numerous works from Japan and the United States, weekly screenings will incorporate animated shorts and feature films from many different regions, including Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Iran, Korea, Mexico, Poland, Russia, and Swaziland. In-class discussions and course assignments will urge students to grapple with complex questions and issues in the field of animation studies.

Faculty
Related Disciplines

Filmmaking and Moving Image Arts

Introduction to Animation Studies

Open , Lecture—Fall

Students who are interested in pursuing a research project for their final project have the option of registering for this class under Film History.

To animate is to bring to life, to instill movement into that which would otherwise be still. Animated films grant their viewers access to imaginary worlds that are frequently populated by anthropomorphic animals, fantastical environments, and utopian societies. But animation takes many forms. This course offers a broad survey of the global history of animation by embracing the diversity of those forms and by encouraging students to draw connections between the techniques and materials employed by animators and the political, social, and cultural functions of animated texts. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of ways in which animation has historically been created, including works made with sand, paper, puppets, pixels, clay, cels, pinscreens, garbage, and other unconventional materials. Along the way, students will familiarize themselves with key films, filmmakers, filmic technologies, and filmmaking traditions by studying animation from various eras, genres, industries, and countries. In addition to featuring numerous works from Japan and the United States, weekly screenings will incorporate animated shorts and feature films from many different regions, including Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Iran, Korea, Mexico, Poland, Russia, and Swaziland. In-class discussions and course assignments will urge students to grapple with complex questions and issues in the field of animation studies.

Faculty
Related Disciplines